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Raleigh, Durham, Chapel Hill, Cary The Triangle Area
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Old 02-25-2013, 05:02 PM
 
15 posts, read 10,387 times
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Hi!
I see a lot of posts that say a lot of NE'ers and NY'ers are in the RTP area but what about any Midwesterners? If so, how do u like the area compared to back home.

Thanks in advance for any posts. ;-)
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Old 02-25-2013, 05:13 PM
Status: "Apple Pie!" (set 6 days ago)
 
Location: Cary, NC
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We have a few:

American Migration [Interactive Map] - Forbes
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Old 02-25-2013, 05:14 PM
 
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Hi!

Are you really asking if there are any transplanted Midwesterners in the Triangle? Seriously? Have you looked around this forum at all?

Anyway, yes, of course there are. Midwesterners are less numerous here than those from the Northeast, but there are still lots of them (us). Something that's very striking about the Triangle, for better or worse, is that it's boomed so much that one meets people here that have moved from literally everywhere around the country, as well as from many foreign countries. During my time here, I've met people from all the major Midwestern cities, and from all the Midwestern states (except North Dakota, I think). Currently, between my immediate neighborhood and my workplace, there are representatives originally from Illinois (myself), Indiana, Michigan, Missouri, Minnesota, and South Dakota. And that's really pretty typical around here, albeit still outnumbered a bit by North Carolina natives, people from other nearby Southern states, and people from Northeastern areas like Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and New York (both the NYC area and Upstate).

Like I said, I grew up in the Midwest, but have lived all over, and now have lived in the Triangle for several years. I like it a lot here, but I also liked living in the Midwest and other places, too. Depending on exactly where in the Midwest you're coming from, there could be some culture shock coming to the Triangle, or there could be very little. If you're from a suburban area there, you'll have virtually no transition in coming here, since realistically in 2013, most American suburbs are pretty much the same, or at least fall within a similar range of attributes, no matter what part of the country they're in. If you're coming from a rural farming area or small town in the Midwest, or from some run-down Rust Belt inner city area, the Triangle will feel a lot different than what you're used to Are there any specific concerns you have, or specific comparisons you'd like help with?

Last edited by tompope; 02-25-2013 at 05:36 PM..
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Old 02-25-2013, 05:48 PM
 
Location: Containment Area, NC
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My husband is from Michigan. He's been here since 2001. Loves it.
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Old 02-25-2013, 06:23 PM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, NC (formerly Vienna, VA)
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In my one year living in Chapel Hill, I think I have met more midwesterners than any other group. I know several people from Ohio, a few from Wisconsin, and several from Michigan.
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Old 02-25-2013, 07:01 PM
 
Location: Finally in NC
1,021 posts, read 729,995 times
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Moved here from WI this past summer.
Miss:
Family, being able to drive anywhere in 10 minutes: lakefront, great museums incl. the most awesome art museum ever, WI Dells for weekend getaways, the largest music festival (Summerfest) local things/foods/restaurants.
Don't miss: snow, winter, 5 months of gray, cranky people, high crime........
I don't care if I never go back!! Love it here! My kids are happier, although they hate to admit it because they didn't want to move. My next door neighbors are from Ohio, have been here 12 years and love it too.
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Old 02-25-2013, 07:49 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tompope View Post

Depending on exactly where in the Midwest you're coming from, there could be some culture shock coming to the Triangle, or there could be very little.
Did you move from Chicago? We are thinking about relocating to RTP area (Morrisville/Cary) from a suburb of Chicago (Arlington Heights) over the summer. Did you have any cultural shock? What do you miss about Chicago and what you don't. Any regret of moving?

The most intimidating thing for us is to decide where to look for a single family home in the area, since the schools are changing so much. Any pointers on long distance house buying in Cary (based on schools)? My son will be attending 7th grade this fall.

Also, anybody has ideas to convince kids to move to RTP area?

Thanks.
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Old 02-25-2013, 08:46 PM
 
920 posts, read 967,782 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goodbyesnow View Post
Moved here from WI this past summer.
Miss:
Family, being able to drive anywhere in 10 minutes: lakefront, great museums incl. the most awesome art museum ever, WI Dells for weekend getaways, ...
Oh, man. The Dells? Really? Wow. I spent quite a bit of time at the Dells in my youth, and it was fine, I guess. But I would never have thought to put it on my list of Midwestern things I miss. What exactly do you miss about the Dells? Those surreptitious Tommy Bartlett bumper stickers? The Dells certainly is a distinctive place, at least. And depending on what part of Wisconsin you moved from, I guess it may have been very convenient for you, or even practically in your back yard. So, to each their own, and you miss what you miss, I guess. But here in this part of the country we have Myrtle Beach, which is a little bit like an oceanic version of the Dells, don't you think? Except a bit, uh, different...

Last edited by tompope; 02-25-2013 at 09:33 PM..
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Old 02-25-2013, 09:28 PM
 
920 posts, read 967,782 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by City-mom View Post
Did you move from Chicago? We are thinking about relocating to RTP area (Morrisville/Cary) from a suburb of Chicago (Arlington Heights) over the summer. Did you have any cultural shock? What do you miss about Chicago and what you don't. Any regret of moving?

The most intimidating thing for us is to decide where to look for a single family home in the area, since the schools are changing so much. Any pointers on long distance house buying in Cary (based on schools)? My son will be attending 7th grade this fall.

Also, anybody has ideas to convince kids to move to RTP area?

Thanks.
Hey, City-mom,

Yes, I grew up in Chicago, and now live in Raleigh (there were a couple stops in between). For me, the "cultural shock" was minimal, but I'm a pretty adaptable and flexible person, so I've rarely had trouble anywhere. Other people who are more rigid and uptight may experience a bit more of that sort of shock, but it still should be manageable. And with you coming from Arlington Heights to Cary/Morrisville, I would expect you to have even less of an adjustment than I did being from the city, since as I mentioned in my prior post, honestly upper-middle-class suburbs are pretty much the same everywhere, whether in Chicagoland, the Triangle, or anywhere else. So I really doubt that you guys would have any problems whatsoever culturally,

What do I miss about Chicago? Some friends and family, of course. Beyond that, I sometimes miss just the bigness and density and frenetic energy of the urban environment there, although again, I was from the city of Chicago, and not the 'burbs. There's some decent (and frequently underrated) urbanness in the older, inner parts of Raleigh and Durham, and those tend to be my favorite parts of the Triangle, but they're still a few orders of magnitude less urban than Chicago, of course. If you're from Arlington Heights, though, that presumably won't matter as much to you. I sometimes miss the staggering array of options available in Chicago for dining, entertainment, nightlife, etc., although I really don't miss them all that much. Realistically, a person only has so much free time and discretionary funds, and so I find that I actually don't need infinite thousands of options. The Triangle actually has quite a bit of cultural amenities and options for an area its size, and I'm almost always satisfied by taking advantage of them. I go to lots of concerts, plays, and other events here, and dine-out on a fairly regular basis at all sorts of terrific restaurants. Again, the sheer volume can't compare to Chicago, but I find that it usually doesn't have to to make me happy. And in the Triangle, we're only two-and-a-half hours from Charlotte, and four-and-a-half hours from Washington, which helps to soothe the parts of me that yearn for a bigger city. Aside from that, I just miss some of the unique and distinctive places and experiences of Chicago, like the Loop, the Lakefront, the el, all the idiosyncratic neighborhoods, the regional and ethnic foods, going to Sox or Bulls games, etc. But I can sate those urges pretty well by making trips back there to visit once in a while. And when I'm there, I find myself at times missing aspects of the Triangle, and of other places I've been. To some extent, that's just the nature of things. And no, I have no regrets about moving, although if I were still living in Chicago, I don't know that I'd regret that either.

I can understand being overwhelmed and confused by the situation with the Wake County public schools, and I can't blame you for having some anxiety about it. But from my experience here (as opposed to Chicago), I think there really are very few if any "bad" schools where I'd be reluctant to send my kids, and most if not all of the public schools at least in Wake County are places where an average kid should have a very good chance of being reasonably comfortable and happy and getting a good education. There's lots of discussion on this forum and elsewhere about identifying which schools are the "best," as in the highest-rated and the highest average test scores, and I guess it's understandable that parents would want to try to position their kids towards those schools as much as possible. But really, since there are few if any "bad" choices (unless you or your kids have some special situation or requirements or something), I wouldn't think it makes sense to worry about it too much. I realize that it's easy for me to say that, though. But to me I think it makes more sense to focus as much or more on finding a home that you like and can afford in a convenient location that suits you.

As far as long-distance house-buying, I have no clue, Or at least no insight beyond just common sense.

And convincing the kids to move, again, I have no idea. Naturally, I guess, it depends a lot on your kids' particular personalities and the nature of your relationship with them. And your approach to persuading them I guess would depend on what their reasons are for being reluctant or resistant. That's between you and them.

Good luck!
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Old 02-26-2013, 09:21 AM
 
7 posts, read 4,628 times
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"Are you really asking if there are any transplanted Midwesterners in the Triangle? Seriously? Have you looked around this forum at all?"

@Tompope--Yes, I have been reading these forums for the past month and not finding much about it. I'm glad I asked or I wouldn't have gotten all the info. YOU gave me!! :-)

Thanks all! P.S. I'm coming from a suburb of Boston but was born in Midwest. Don't like the weather there but like the people.
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