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Old 10-21-2013, 11:17 AM
 
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Anyone notice that even though gas has been over $3 a gallon for 3 years, that the newer houses being built are no more energy efficient than the ones built in the 1980's? Maybe they have a higher SEER AC or heat pump, but not much else has changed.
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Old 10-21-2013, 11:51 AM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ > Raleigh, NC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mlhm5 View Post
Anyone notice that even though gas has been over $3 a gallon for 3 years, that the newer houses being built are no more energy efficient than the ones built in the 1980's? Maybe they have a higher SEER AC or heat pump, but not much else has changed.
Depends on the builder. Ours is an Energy Star Home, built in 2013. We receive a discount from gas and electric companies after submitting our Energy Star Certificate.
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Old 10-21-2013, 12:13 PM
 
Location: Cary, NC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mlhm5 View Post
Anyone notice that even though gas has been over $3 a gallon for 3 years, that the newer houses being built are no more energy efficient than the ones built in the 1980's? Maybe they have a higher SEER AC or heat pump, but not much else has changed.
Gas is still cheap.

And energy standards in housing are significantly improved in the last 25 years.
Some items:
Sealing of penetrations.
House wrap.
Improved insulation standards.
Spray foam insulation.
Radiant barriers.
Sealed and conditioned crawlspaces.
Zoned HVAC units.

Homes are tighter, with higher U values.

The next real energy-efficiency gains to be realized will be in supply-chain for materials, reduction of landfill waste, and mixed-use development to reduce commute.
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Old 10-21-2013, 12:27 PM
 
Location: NC
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Originally Posted by VickiR View Post

So, I believe, now is the right time to sell. Why wouldn't you sell in this market versus the market we had 2 years ago?

Am I not understanding your question?

Vicki
I would agree with selling now, vs. 2 years ago, but I think the question is "if house prices are on the rise, why would you sell now, rather than hold out a little longer?" I realize there is no right answer to this question, it depends on a lot of factors, and a little bit of luck, but I do think that it's prudent to question when someone says "NOW" is the time to sell. (And respectfully, because I do think you are one of the better contributors on this forum, I would say that your POV is a little biased by design. You benefit from people buying and selling homes, so there is a potential for conflict of interest. [respectfully])

For me, I just bought my house six months ago, and felt like I timed it PERFECTLY. That means that the seller sold at the near-bottom. So from my perspective, if it's a perfect time to buy, it may not be the perfect time to sell.
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Old 10-21-2013, 12:31 PM
 
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Originally Posted by VickiR View Post
Supply and demand...
Something's not quite working right with that ole micro-economic model. (Or maybe it is and there's just something masking what's really going on). Realtors are saying supply is not keeping up with demand, which should be driving prices up (which would increase supply and/or dampen demand to bring things into equilibrium). But that doesn't seem to be happening (much) according to the press.
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Old 10-21-2013, 12:32 PM
 
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Although prices may not have returned to previous levels (depending on situation), homeowners also need to weigh out the fact that if they wait to SELL their homes for a higher price, they will also likely be BUYING their replacement property at a higher price.
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Old 10-21-2013, 12:39 PM
 
Location: Cary, NC
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Originally Posted by CHTransplant View Post
Something's not quite working right with that ole micro-economic model. (Or maybe it is and there's just something masking what's really going on). Realtors are saying supply is not keeping up with demand, which should be driving prices up (which would increase supply and/or dampen demand to bring things into equilibrium). But that doesn't seem to be happening (much) according to the press.
http://www.trianglemls.com/getfile.c...rend/file/1493
YOY, inventory is up, as are closings. September, 2013. From the good folks at the Triangle MLS and RRAR.
A rise in median and mean average sales prices can be influenced by a market segment that shows higher volume than the prior year, as much as rising prices.

While NAR will guild the lily routinely, I would also never count on the press to offer cogent stats on real estate.
They ignore too many variables and dwell on relative figures as absolute. It's like watching a news anchor read "The stock market responded with a .04 % dip," when the anchor has no idea what that sentence means, absolutely or relatively.
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Old 10-21-2013, 01:30 PM
 
Location: Apex, NC
2,950 posts, read 7,186,871 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mlhm5 View Post
Anyone notice that even though gas has been over $3 a gallon for 3 years, that the newer houses being built are no more energy efficient than the ones built in the 1980's? Maybe they have a higher SEER AC or heat pump, but not much else has changed.
I don't know why you would think that. My new home which was finished earlier this year is SO much more efficient than my old house built in 1995. My energy bills have been about 20-30% less, even though it's 1,100 Sq. Ft. bigger! When it's cold or hot outside the temperature has stayed almost consistent. I didn't have my heat on last night and two of my three zones stayed at 70 degrees with the master bedroom at 69. In my old house it would have been in the upper 50's to 60s inside the house this morning if I didn't have the heat on.

The gaps are tighter, the materials being used now are lighter and insulate better, the Low E windows are absolutely amazing and the heat/ac and water heater are also more efficient. It's a night a day difference from my old house, which is only 18 years old.
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Old 10-21-2013, 01:56 PM
 
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Default tough one

A. Hard to invest in your homes efficiency when most people are moving all over the place. If you think I am not moving and then need to find a new job, that changes pretty quick. Why invest if your not going to stay?

B. Most of the people moving here are still coming from other higher priced areas. No large amount of new jobs have been created to sustain them.
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Old 10-21-2013, 02:14 PM
 
Location: Cary, NC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ducter View Post
A. Hard to invest in your homes efficiency when most people are moving all over the place. If you think I am not moving and then need to find a new job, that changes pretty quick. Why invest if your not going to stay?

B. Most of the people moving here are still coming from other higher priced areas. No large amount of new jobs have been created to sustain them.
A. Code standards have evolved. There is no investment per se. There is either proper execution or lack of proper execution.
With proper execution, homes are more energy efficient than they were 25 years ago. Saving energy also helps make them more affordable.
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