U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > North Carolina > Raleigh, Durham, Chapel Hill, Cary
 [Register]
Raleigh, Durham, Chapel Hill, Cary The Triangle Area
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Closed Thread Start New Thread
 
Old 01-13-2014, 01:57 PM
 
Location: Hillsborough
2,825 posts, read 6,117,289 times
Reputation: 2625

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by 2Loud View Post
HIGHLY recommend Triangle Beagle Rescue. They take in beagles and our last two dogs are from this great organization. They are very helpful and the prices are quite reasonable. They spend a lot of time socializing the dogs and getting them house broken (if adult enough). They do a show every other week mostly in Durham area. Well worth the drive. Who can resist a little Arrrooooo!

Here is a link to them: Triangle Beagle Rescue | North Carolina | Put a Little Hound In Your Heart

Can not recommend them enough.
My dog is also from Triangle Beagle Rescue, and I recommend them highly. My previous two dogs were from the Durham APS and the Orange APS. Not that I had a bad experience with the shelters or anything, but I had such a good experience with the rescue that if I were going to get another dog, I would definitely go back to them.

 
Old 01-13-2014, 02:05 PM
 
2,424 posts, read 3,441,178 times
Reputation: 2264
Adopting animals in the Triangle is a BUSY business. Shelter dogs get picked over quickly. many are adopted out before the public is even aware. A lot of shelters work hand in hand with rescue groups, and the rescue groups will snatch up anything that resembles their particular target breed. Adopting through breed specific rescue groups is a very time consuming, and likely frustrating endeavor. It's my opinion that many are not much more than glorified dog horders. Your best bet is to watch the shelters web sites, and act quickly. Non pit-mix breeds, especially those resembling specific breeds, will usually be adopted within a matter of hours.

Driving to shelters away from the Triangle is good advice. The more rural areas have fewer people trying to adopt, and you're not fighting people who live closer to the shelter than you. One of the shelters in Raleigh told us that many of the more attractive breeds are adopted over the phone within minutes of arriving and being logged in. We watched their website daily. When we drove over there, there were more dogs than on their website, most of which had been adopted over the phone, mostly by rescue groups, as we were told my workers there. I got my dog from a shelter 2.5 hours drive from Raleigh. I saw him on their website, and called them. They held him till I could get there, nearly 3 hours later, minutes before they closed. They told me they had taken several calls from rescue groups, but don't adopt dogs to rescue groups until they've been available to the public first. Apparently it's a "big business" in some areas. But my dog was also one of the more "attractive" breeds, one that is very expensive, and nearly impossible to adopt from a shelter unless you are affiliated with a local rescue organization and have connections.
 
Old 01-13-2014, 02:06 PM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
4,807 posts, read 6,126,351 times
Reputation: 3742
Another option is Calvin's Paws. It's mostly cats but they also adopt out dogs. I used to volunteer with them.
 
Old 01-13-2014, 02:17 PM
 
Location: Triangle NC
426 posts, read 1,349,583 times
Reputation: 236
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mom2Bulldogs View Post

Be prepared to fill out a lengthy application and prepare for a home visit. I think all rescues should do this, personally.
Its my opinion some some rescues make the application process too lengthy and difficult, steering suitable families towards breeders, Craigslist etc. I understand that that they want the best possible homes for their rescues but sometimes they are too picky. They have limited resources/volunteers and in the time they take to review an application, do a home visit etc, they could have saved more dogs from being euthanized. A person should be able to adopt on the spot with a quick informal interview and a vet reference. If the dog has special needs or there are other requirements like no small children etc. they can be a bit more picky to ensure that those needs are met.
 
Old 01-13-2014, 02:22 PM
 
2,424 posts, read 3,441,178 times
Reputation: 2264
Some of the local breed specific rescue groups are harder to adopt from than the average person can imagine. A lot of those dogs, that they are "trying" to find home for have been in their care for two or more years. I know one or two breed specific groups who rarely EVER adopt out. Most of the animals end up in the groups members homes forever. The application and interview process rivals that of the CIA!

I've seen some of these requirements.....dead serious.

1) household income requirements
2) one family member must be home all day, can't be a two income family if both work the same hours. Dog should never be left home alone all day.
3) no children.
4) no children under a certain age, have seen this 12 years old, 10, etc.
5) home inspections required
6) minimum yard requirements, fences mandatory, sometimes fence height minimums.
 
Old 01-13-2014, 02:32 PM
 
9,198 posts, read 21,892,309 times
Reputation: 8539
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheBigKahunaNC View Post
Some of the local breed specific rescue groups are harder to adopt from than the average person can imagine. A lot of those dogs, that they are "trying" to find home for have been in their care for two or more years. I know one or two breed specific groups who rarely EVER adopt out. Most of the animals end up in the groups members homes forever. The application and interview process rivals that of the CIA!
We did have one rescue group tell us that our best bet was to become a foster family, as most of their dogs ended up staying with the family that fostered them.
 
Old 01-13-2014, 03:36 PM
 
Location: under the beautiful Carolina blue
16,792 posts, read 25,864,794 times
Reputation: 12727
We got our puppy from Wake SPCA, best deal in town if you ask me. He's an awesome dog, I didn't really want a puppy but got overruled When we got there to look at dogs they about 16 puppies of different breeds and one of them came home with us. Vaccinated, microchipped, neutered and de-wormed for a $95 adoption fee. He's 11 months old now.

I had looked at some local rescue groups but they were pretty expensive aside from all the background stuff. My DH did spend an hour with the staff at the SPCA though, going through what our home is like, kids' ages etc.
 
Old 01-13-2014, 04:03 PM
 
Location: NC
6,553 posts, read 7,974,458 times
Reputation: 13460
I heartily support using petfinder.com. It works like a search engine, and you search on dog characteristics, key words, and distance from where you live. You can visually scan a hundred pet photos if you like, then click on the types that appeal to you for more information. It is a great resource.
 
Old 01-13-2014, 04:20 PM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
3,482 posts, read 4,172,686 times
Reputation: 4613
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheBigKahunaNC View Post
Adopting animals in the Triangle is a BUSY business. Shelter dogs get picked over quickly. many are adopted out before the public is even aware.
The Wake SPCA has a Wish Book where you can be notified if a dog comes in that matches your desires.
SPCA of Wake County: Frequently Asked Questions - SPCA of Wake County
 
Old 01-13-2014, 07:09 PM
 
449 posts, read 339,508 times
Reputation: 1002
Requirements aren't for poops 'n giggles, they're to try and assure that the dog will be in the home forever. If they're jumpers and runners, a fence is a necessity; if they aren't good with having their tails pulled, being hugged, having their toys/food played with or are powerful, "no children" or "no children under 10" is understandable. Home visits make sure there's nothing that needs to be puppy-proofed and often they will help you make sure your prized possessions aren't chewed off the coffee table. Not to mention removing the chocolate candy from the side table to save you an emergency trip to the vet. Some breeds can prone to hefty vet bills, assessing your income just makes sure you are prepared for the financial burden of a particular dog.

These rescues are asking the info to make sure the animal will be well looked after and loved for the rest of its life. You know, so it doesn't end up in one of the thousands of kill shelters after a year or ten.

This is so off topic. I apologize for adding to it.

Good luck with your adoption OP.
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Closed Thread



Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > North Carolina > Raleigh, Durham, Chapel Hill, Cary
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top