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Old 05-26-2014, 10:32 PM
 
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I've been to Portland and do enjoy the public transportation options there. That said, everything I have read about mass transit in Portland seems to indicate they are constantly operating with budget shortfalls and use federal funds to bridge the gap. So even there, while wildly popular it isn't financially self-sufficient. Probably easier to keep it afloat once in place using federal money than it would be to kickstart a project from the ground up here in the Triangle where there are doubts about how many would use it.

That said I would like to see a pilot project started here, though I think it is important to recognize even in places that seem to get it "right" there remain serious questions on how tosh for it in the long run.
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Old 05-27-2014, 06:30 AM
DPK
 
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Let's just jack up the cost of petroleum and then see how many people ride it.

(I'm only half kidding.)
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Old 05-27-2014, 06:32 AM
 
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Unfortunately, much of Raleigh still has a conservative, suburban mindset. Thankfully, Durham and Chapel Hill are much more progressive and cosmopolitan in thinking.
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Old 05-27-2014, 07:46 AM
 
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I think this is a good idea, Light Rail could be above ground.

In Newark, NJ, NJ Transit took the old Newark city subway, which dates back to the 1930's, and made it Light Rail.

Amtrak owns every bit of track in New Jersey, except the Light Rail Lines.

I can't wait to relocate, hopefully soon!
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Old 05-27-2014, 05:32 PM
 
Location: West Raleigh
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Quote:
Originally Posted by North_Raleigh_Guy View Post
I've been to Portland and do enjoy the public transportation options there. That said, everything I have read about mass transit in Portland seems to indicate they are constantly operating with budget shortfalls and use federal funds to bridge the gap. So even there, while wildly popular it isn't financially self-sufficient. Probably easier to keep it afloat once in place using federal money than it would be to kickstart a project from the ground up here in the Triangle where there are doubts about how many would use it.

I know this has been debated before (likely in this thread) but why is everyone so hung up on public transit (of any kind) being self-sufficient? Roads for sure aren't, and not everyone that pays for roads actually use them either, so why apply this standard to transit?
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Old 05-27-2014, 05:45 PM
 
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Originally Posted by StAndroid View Post
I know this has been debated before (likely in this thread) but why is everyone so hung up on public transit (of any kind) being self-sufficient? Roads for sure aren't, and not everyone that pays for roads actually use them either, so why apply this standard to transit?
Because rail costs are much higher than roads. Roads are already here, a light rail system would have to be built from the ground up. In a city the size of Raleigh there may not be enough ridership to support such a system and it would end up like Amtrak.
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Old 05-27-2014, 09:58 PM
 
354 posts, read 521,860 times
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Originally Posted by netbrad View Post
Because rail costs are much higher than roads. Roads are already here, a light rail system would have to be built from the ground up. In a city the size of Raleigh there may not be enough ridership to support such a system and it would end up like Amtrak.
well what about Richmond having a lightrail?? Richmond & Raleigh are about the same size i bet yall wouldnt say the same about Richmond
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Old 05-27-2014, 10:29 PM
 
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Originally Posted by dontstressem22 View Post
well what about Richmond having a lightrail?? Richmond & Raleigh are about the same size i bet yall wouldnt say the same about Richmond
Richmond VA? I lived there for 10 years and that population isn't large enough to support rail either.
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Old 05-27-2014, 10:42 PM
 
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Originally Posted by netbrad View Post
Richmond VA? I lived there for 10 years and that population isn't large enough to support rail either.
True but at least Raleigh-Durham & Chapel Hill is all right beside each other
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Old 05-28-2014, 01:31 PM
 
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I'm not sure if people grasp how quickly this area is growing. If you look at the population growth rates between 2010 and 2013 of Combined Statistical Areas (CSA's) with over a million people, the Triangle is #1 in the entire country:

1) Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill, NC CSA: +6.52%
2) Houston-The Woodlands, TX CSA: +6.44%
3) Cape Coral-Fort Myers-Naples, FL CSA: +6.43%
4) Denver-Aurora, CO CSA: +6.03%
5) Dallas-Fort Worth, TX CSA: +5.70%
6) Greenville-Spartanburg-Anderson, SC CSA: +5.61%
7) Orlando-Deltona-Daytona Beach, FL CSA: +5.59%
8) Salt Lake City-Provo-Oram, UT CSA: +5.17%
9) Oklahoma City-Shawnee, OK CSA: +5.17%
10) Nashville-Davidson-Murfreesboro, TN CSA: +4.95%

It actually worries me to be at the top of this list. Traffic could become a huge mess, and given the 10+ year lead time for building any kind of commuter rail system, I'm surprised that more people don't support it out of fear for their daily commute time.

The issue isn't the current need for light rail, it's whether we will need it in 15 years. Those decisions need to be made now.

ETA: The Austin-Round Rock, TX Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) is not part of a larger CSA, and is growing faster than the Triangle, but the point still remains.
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