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Old 11-06-2015, 04:08 PM
 
3,995 posts, read 2,727,978 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ed_RDNC View Post
RE: French Drains. Remember that they are not final answers, but rather temporary "parking" for water. The ground water flows into it, and then slowly percolates out into the ground.
I don't believe this is true? Don't french drains carry water either to a pump, or a gravity-fed drain by design?
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Old 11-06-2015, 07:42 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by m378 View Post
I don't believe this is true? Don't french drains carry water either to a pump, or a gravity-fed drain by design?
In this area, to be effective, they really should daylight to somewhere appropriate for the water to go.
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Old 11-07-2015, 11:42 AM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
1,999 posts, read 3,107,566 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ed_RDNC View Post
RE: French Drains. Remember that they are not final answers, but rather temporary "parking" for water. The ground water flows into it, and then slowly percolates out into the ground. Maybe your ground is already saturated, and so there's nowhere for additional water to go, causing it to back up and pond in your yard.
Quote:
Originally Posted by m378 View Post
I don't believe this is true? Don't french drains carry water either to a pump, or a gravity-fed drain by design?
Just google "French Drain". This term is defined to be a simple hole in the ground filled with large sized gravel, and used to accommodate surge rainfall that is faster than the general soil can absorb because the soil has insufficient water permeability. So the water is routed to a temporary holding volume where it can then soak out into the soil over a longer time.

(I did this for my house): I had a clay based soil that couldn't absorb water fast, that also had too limited a slope for simple drain-off. So I buried a pipe from my gutter downspouts across to the low point in my yard where I dug out a pretty good sized pit and filled the bottom 90% with gravel. Ran the pipe into the side, and covered it all up. Rainfall went right into the pit, filling the spaces between the rocks. (The rocks kept the soil from collapsing back and filling the hole over time). The rain water would then percolate just like from a septic field, back into the yard over the slower time that the clay-soil would accept.
I put an herb garden over the top, to accommodate the longer than average moist time and keep me from stirring up the mud if I happen to walk there, and also gave the herbs a longer time to drink the water. Win Win.
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Old 11-07-2015, 12:06 PM
 
3,995 posts, read 2,727,978 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ed_RDNC View Post
Just google "French Drain". This term is defined to be a simple hole in the ground filled with large sized gravel, and used to accommodate surge rainfall that is faster than the general soil can absorb because the soil has insufficient water permeability. So the water is routed to a temporary holding volume where it can then soak out into the soil over a longer time.

(I did this for my house): I had a clay based soil that couldn't absorb water fast, that also had too limited a slope for simple drain-off. So I buried a pipe from my gutter downspouts across to the low point in my yard where I dug out a pretty good sized pit and filled the bottom 90% with gravel. Ran the pipe into the side, and covered it all up. Rainfall went right into the pit, filling the spaces between the rocks. (The rocks kept the soil from collapsing back and filling the hole over time). The rain water would then percolate just like from a septic field, back into the yard over the slower time that the clay-soil would accept.
I put an herb garden over the top, to accommodate the longer than average moist time and keep me from stirring up the mud if I happen to walk there, and also gave the herbs a longer time to drink the water. Win Win.
We're both right:

"A French drain[1] or weeping tile (also blind drain,[1] rubble drain,[1] rock drain,[1] drain tile, perimeter drain, land drain, French ditch, sub-surface drain, sub-soil drain or agricultural drain) is a trench filled with gravel or rock or containing a perforated pipe that redirects surface water and groundwater away from an area. A French drain can have perforated hollow pipes along the bottom (see images) to quickly vent water that seeps down through the upper gravel or rock."
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Old 11-09-2015, 08:06 AM
 
608 posts, read 587,923 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BullCity75 View Post
Is the problem that you have fescue grass and you haven't been overseeding it?

If the water is accumulating in a low spot, have somebody bring you some top soil and level it out. There may have been a big tree in that spot and the roots are rotting.
It doesn't seem like a low spot, but with the grass not growing there (been overseeding it, but it did not help) it may be the problem. I'll add some top soil along with some seeds for now
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Old 11-09-2015, 10:02 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jaiho View Post
It doesn't seem like a low spot, but with the grass not growing there (been overseeding it, but it did not help) it may be the problem. I'll add some top soil along with some seeds for now
In that case, it could be something about the soil that the grass doesn't like. You can get a free soil test though the cooperative extension. It could be that there was a low spot and somebody filled it with substandard soil. Adding some good soil on top of it may help. You might also add fertilizer, lime, and gypsum which are typically needed in this area. If the soil seem compacted, try loosening it up with a shovel.
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Old 11-09-2015, 01:23 PM
 
608 posts, read 587,923 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BullCity75 View Post
In that case, it could be something about the soil that the grass doesn't like. You can get a free soil test though the cooperative extension. It could be that there was a low spot and somebody filled it with substandard soil. Adding some good soil on top of it may help. You might also add fertilizer, lime, and gypsum which are typically needed in this area. If the soil seem compacted, try loosening it up with a shovel.
Right now (And even when it hasn't rained in 2-3 weeks), the area is just mostly mush. How long does the soil test take?
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Old 11-10-2015, 05:44 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jaiho View Post
Right now (And even when it hasn't rained in 2-3 weeks), the area is just mostly mush. How long does the soil test take?
1-2 Weeks
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Old 11-10-2015, 06:01 PM
 
Location: Apex NC, the Peak of Good Loving.
1,462 posts, read 1,657,690 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jaiho View Post
How long does the soil test take?
The free test performed by the NC Department of Agriculture might not answer your questions.
For information, see http://www.ncagr.gov/agronomi/pdffiles/stflyer.pdf

.
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Old 11-10-2015, 06:50 PM
 
745 posts, read 751,302 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by danielbmartin View Post
The free test performed by the NC Department of Agriculture might not answer your questions.
For information, see http://www.ncagr.gov/agronomi/pdffiles/stflyer.pdf

.
I think it will tell plenty, namely if the soil in this spot is different than the soil in the rest of the yard and how it can be improved to grow grass better. I think its a mud hole because it doesn't have any grass growing in it. It doesn't have grass growing in it because it is either a low spot or has poor soil conditions (probably too acidic).
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