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Old 11-05-2015, 08:46 AM
 
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I have major water accumulation in my yard. Two years back the area around my driveway was lush green and this year I have about 30 sqft of muddy area that accumulates water immediately. I do have a drain but it is about 20 ft away from where the damage is. And, the damage seems to be "spreading". What should I do? People have suggested that I install a French drain pipe as well as look into adding more of an incline. I was wondering if it is possible for me to just "treat" my soil in the area with the water accumulation with say compost or sand to help it retain water better. I'll try to add more pictures once I get home.
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Old 11-05-2015, 09:36 AM
 
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Septic tanks in your neighborhood?
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Old 11-05-2015, 09:44 AM
 
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I'm a newbie so I don't know if this is par for the course, but it seems like there's been a lot of rain in the past month or two. I'm guessing a lot of people are having similar issues.

Our backyard is having issues as well - if it were my house, I'd probably install some sort of french drain.
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Old 11-05-2015, 09:52 AM
 
Location: Apex NC, the Peak of Good Loving.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jaiho View Post
... I was wondering if it is possible for me to just "treat" my soil in the area with the water accumulation with say compost or sand to help it retain water better. ...
You must find a way to allow excess water to leave your yard. The best way to do this depends on the terrain. A French Drain may be adequate. Perhaps you will have clean fill dirt trucked in and spread, forming a gentle natural grade. This grade must lead away from your house.

Isaac Newton requires water to run downhill. That principle applies to a French Drain or a recontoured lot.

.
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Old 11-05-2015, 02:21 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by danielbmartin View Post
You must find a way to allow excess water to leave your yard. The best way to do this depends on the terrain. A French Drain may be adequate. Perhaps you will have clean fill dirt trucked in and spread, forming a gentle natural grade. This grade must lead away from your house.

Isaac Newton requires water to run downhill. That principle applies to a French Drain or a recontoured lot.

.
Thanks for the input. Why would this not have been a problem two years back then? When you say French drain, do you mean the actual drain or a pipe that leads to the French Drain (which I already have)? How much do you guys suppose this costs? I got a quote for $1000 which seems crazy being that a French drain hose was only $100.
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Old 11-05-2015, 02:23 PM
 
606 posts, read 583,165 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by m378 View Post
I'm a newbie so I don't know if this is par for the course, but it seems like there's been a lot of rain in the past month or two. I'm guessing a lot of people are having similar issues.

Our backyard is having issues as well - if it were my house, I'd probably install some sort of french drain.
That's what I told myself last year and the year before. The area without grass is increasing every year in my case.
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Old 11-05-2015, 03:36 PM
 
Location: Apex NC, the Peak of Good Loving.
1,455 posts, read 1,642,465 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jaiho View Post
... Why would this not have been a problem two years back then? ...
Hard to say. Water accumulates according to the permeability of the soil, the amount of rainfall and in the timespan of the rainfall(s). Maybe two years ago there was more rain overall, but fewer four-day rainy spells. Regardless of what happened two years ago, you have a problem now and want to deal with it now.

Quote:
I got a quote for $1000 which seems crazy being that a French drain hose was only $100.
For a job of this nature the labor component is larger than the materials cost. The cost would be influenced by the length of trench needed, the depth of the trench, the characteristics of the soil to be excavated (rocky, sandy, etc.). In some cases the drain must be run under a driveway. ($$$!)

.
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Old 11-05-2015, 06:02 PM
 
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Is it grass or weeds? Our backyard is "natural" and while it is green there are patches that are just weeds. We had a 4x 4 area that was covered with something and when we removed it the area under was just dirt, the weeds died. Well when it rained this area developed into a mud pit, it got bigger took forever to dry out. It seemed to stay a mud pit. After we installed SOD in the front of our house we installed the left over on top of the mud pit. Now that there is grass with deep roots to absorb the water the area is beautiful and does not even get mushy with heavy rain. I am not saying this will cure your problem but it would be better then just adding compost.
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Old 11-06-2015, 04:46 AM
 
742 posts, read 746,280 times
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Is the problem that you have fescue grass and you haven't been overseeding it?

If the water is accumulating in a low spot, have somebody bring you some top soil and level it out. There may have been a big tree in that spot and the roots are rotting.
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Old 11-06-2015, 06:29 AM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
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RE: French Drains. Remember that they are not final answers, but rather temporary "parking" for water. The ground water flows into it, and then slowly percolates out into the ground. Maybe your ground is already saturated, and so there's nowhere for additional water to go, causing it to back up and pond in your yard.

Also, landscaped yards may settle and compact over time, changing the relative elevations, and therefore the path that water 'likes' to flow to get downhill. Maybe your yard has settled in a way that the water no longer flows out, causing the ponding.
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