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Old 11-13-2015, 06:10 AM
 
Location: Morrisville, NC
7,707 posts, read 10,112,172 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BoBromhal View Post
there aren't any year-round schools where the highest priced real estate in Wake County is ITB. Some of the SE Raleigh, but within the confines of the 440 Beltline, areas are asssigned to MYR school in Cary.
That's what I thought. So, high priced real estate with virtually no new build price competition has no year round. Fast growing areas with tons of new build and price competition has lots of year round.
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Old 11-13-2015, 06:13 AM
 
Location: Cary, NC
31,663 posts, read 55,462,661 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sherifftruman View Post
That's what I thought. So, high priced real estate with virtually no new build price competition has no year round. Fast growing areas with tons of new build and price competition has lots of year round.
Actually, if it is a credible study, they will have adjusted for that dynamic.

Mixing "price penalty" and "lower property values" in their advertising begs for clarification.
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Old 11-13-2015, 11:19 AM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
10,323 posts, read 18,704,789 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by keadlez View Post
Important to remember that even statistical significance is not proof of a causal relationship.
Hopefully everyone is aware of this, but then again, you could say that about ANY Social Research study. Even if you say "people who smoke are more likely to get lung cancer", there are probably holes someone could shoot in the assertion that there is causality; to my knowledge, social research studies only look for correlation, not causality, for the most part. You'd have to interview people and ask the reasons for X to even predict that.
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Old 11-13-2015, 12:06 PM
 
Location: Raleigh NC
5,289 posts, read 4,586,940 times
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Chicken or egg.

Year round schools are desirable in lower income areas, because child care, taking vacations during off peak times, and prevention of summer slide are all issues for lower incomes.

It's a good thing!

The more important question is, has school performance in those areas increased since year-round started there?
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Old 11-13-2015, 01:21 PM
 
228 posts, read 132,246 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Francois View Post
Hopefully everyone is aware of this, but then again, you could say that about ANY Social Research study. Even if you say "people who smoke are more likely to get lung cancer", there are probably holes someone could shoot in the assertion that there is causality; to my knowledge, social research studies only look for correlation, not causality, for the most part. You'd have to interview people and ask the reasons for X to even predict that.
Someone could try to shoot holes in the causality link between smoking and lung cancer, but they would be absolutely annihilated by all of the scientific proofs that have been created over the last few decades. It has been conclusively proven.

I don't disagree with you though that most published research studies are, as you said, designed to highlight correlation rather than causation. That's really the purpose of research a lot of times, to identify correlating elements, present the data, then its up to the consumer of the data to come to their own conclusions. In other words some WELL-PAID "expert witness" in a courtroom somewhere will be able to use the results of the study to support their argument (assuming of course they don't mind to pony up twenty bucks for a copy of the study). What they are used for most is media outlets to conjure up "news" in order to find something interesting to write articles about.

However you picked kind of a bad example to illustrate that with smoking. People like the hired "experts" of the tobacco companies were able to knock holes in the theory maybe in the 60s, 70s, etc., but too much has been documented since regarding measurable damage to tissue, for example, that has been irrefutably linked at a causal level to the act of smoking, for the statement "people who smoke are at higher risk for cancer" to be called out as possibly untrue or remotely debatable. If someone tried to make more specific statements, like X years of smoking necessarily leads to Y years off a human life, then it gets well into the range of non-proofs and debatable topics.

For the record, property values may very well be directly impacted by school calendar choices -- I wasn't debating that it could be. I just wanted to point out the difference between correlation and causality, as you said. What's obvious to you and I might not be to everyone -- there are folks of a variety of educational backgrounds that read this forum and I'm sure not all have advanced science degrees or were stats majors.
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Old 11-13-2015, 02:51 PM
 
Location: Raleigh
7,057 posts, read 5,238,998 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stagemomma View Post
Chicken or egg.

Year round schools are desirable in lower income areas, because child care, taking vacations during off peak times, and prevention of summer slide are all issues for lower incomes.

It's a good thing!

The more important question is, has school performance in those areas increased since year-round started there?
That is really interesting and I never looked at it that way.
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Old 11-13-2015, 03:31 PM
 
Location: Apex, NC
2,938 posts, read 7,151,431 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JONOV View Post
That is really interesting and I never looked at it that way.
Why would year round school be beneficial for child care? They are all out of school for the same amount of time every year. Also, doesn't everyone like off-peak vacations!
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Old 11-13-2015, 05:46 PM
 
Location: under the beautiful Carolina blue
15,781 posts, read 24,071,151 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Waterboy526 View Post
Why would year round school be beneficial for child care? They are all out of school for the same amount of time every year. Also, doesn't everyone like off-peak vacations!
I agree. Honestly the people I know who love YR the best are high net worth people who want to take a lot of vacations when no one else is around. Actually harder to find good cheap childcare in 3 week stretches, and HS kids are not available because there are no YR high schools.

Also no way to quantify the effect of YR schooling on low income kids unless there is a YR school made up entirely of low income kids that was once a traditional school, and even then you aren't testing the same kids at the same level every year (3rd graders become 4th graders and then 5th graders). It is impossible to quantify that.
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Old 11-13-2015, 11:22 PM
 
1,840 posts, read 5,135,827 times
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First off, year round schools are a wonderful education model, based on the idea that several short breaks between quarters allows for consistent learning throughout the year vs one long break during the summer, which results in needing to reprogram kids for several weeks at the beginning of each school year.

Second, Wake county does not use year round schools as intended as a wonderful education model, but rather as a multi-track mechanism by which to shoehorn the maximum number of students into a given building as possible. Some of the tracks are ridiculous.

The problem is the multi tracking, not the year round calendar. Build enough schools to house all the kids on one track, then have some rational year round magnets (i.e. 3 week fall, christmas and spring break) and the base schools as traditional calendar, and let folks choose.
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Old 11-15-2015, 08:23 AM
 
1,601 posts, read 2,699,732 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeJaquish View Post
ETA: Whoops. I don't have $19.95 worth of curiosity. So, I will have to wait for the N&O to skim and misquote the research.

.
How else you gonna take home another 500 dollar prize? Need to spend money to make money!
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