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Old 11-12-2015, 09:06 PM
 
Location: Raleigh NC
7,758 posts, read 6,119,124 times
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not really.

as to mid-school reassignment, we don't currently require any student to leave the school they currently attend. and several years ago we pretty much quit reassigning kids in their "last" year of a given school, unless the family chose to be reassigned. In other words, for most K-5 schools, you don't spend your 5th grade year at a different school unless you choose to. I think we grandfather at 4th grade, in fact (neverminding the "choice" rules).
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Old 11-13-2015, 04:53 AM
 
Location: under the beautiful Carolina blue
15,732 posts, read 23,966,899 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by m378 View Post
Random, sort-of-but-not-really-related question.

When they do reassignments, do they take the age of the neighborhoods into account? It doesn't seem fair for an older neighborhood to be reassigned just because a bunch of new neighborhoods are being built around them.
Not really.

I think Cedar Fork is dealing with this right now - they are moving a neighborhood out of there and to accommodate newer neighborhoods being built. There's been a huge outcry, so they are talking about capping the school again instead.
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Old 11-13-2015, 06:54 AM
 
Location: My House
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Quote:
Originally Posted by twingles View Post
Not really.

I think Cedar Fork is dealing with this right now - they are moving a neighborhood out of there and to accommodate newer neighborhoods being built. There's been a huge outcry, so they are talking about capping the school again instead.
Yup.

Thing is, you are protected somewhat if you reside in an established area with little to no nearby areas where large, new neighborhoods can be built. But, if your older neighborhood is near empty land and new neighborhoods start cropping up, it doesn't really matter that yours is older.
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Old 11-13-2015, 07:00 AM
 
3,932 posts, read 2,673,092 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RedZin View Post
Yup.

Thing is, you are protected somewhat if you reside in an established area with little to no nearby areas where large, new neighborhoods can be built. But, if your older neighborhood is near empty land and new neighborhoods start cropping up, it doesn't really matter that yours is older.
Let me rephrase. Say I'm in a neighborhood built in the 90's and currently assigned to school X. They build a neighborhood of 300 new houses on some land abutting my neighborhood, and school Y opens up a couple miles away. Is it possible that my kids would be reassigned and put into school Y, while the 300 new houses get assigned to school X?

If that's the case, that hardly seems right. I realize "you gotta do what you gotta do", but given the choice of an older neighborhood and a brand new neighborhood, I would hope the newer neighborhood gets the reassign.
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Old 11-13-2015, 07:14 AM
 
Location: My House
33,063 posts, read 26,880,121 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by m378 View Post
Let me rephrase. Say I'm in a neighborhood built in the 90's and currently assigned to school X. They build a neighborhood of 300 new houses on some land abutting my neighborhood, and school Y opens up a couple miles away. Is it possible that my kids would be reassigned and put into school Y, while the 300 new houses get assigned to school X?

If that's the case, that hardly seems right. I realize "you gotta do what you gotta do", but given the choice of an older neighborhood and a brand new neighborhood, I would hope the newer neighborhood gets the reassign.
There's no way to know.

They try not to reassign kids, but let's say your neighborhood school is a bit heavy on kids from higher-income families, for example. Then, let's say a new neighborhood is built next door to yours with more expensive homes in it.

Your neighborhood's kids from middle (or lower) income families might wind up at the newer school and those kids from the higher-income neighborhood could wind up at your old school to balance the population.

Or not. You never know.

It's safer to be surrounded with land that's already built up.

I can tell you that I've lived all over Wake and I was never reassigned as a kid and my kids have never been reassigned.
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Old 11-13-2015, 07:41 AM
 
Location: Apex, NC
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We live in an older neighborhood where the kids were going to schools A, B, & C depending on which specific street they lived on within the neighborhood. Then they built a new school D and now my son gets to go to school D with all his friends from the neighborhood who used to go to A, B & C. He isn't exactly broken up about it.
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Old 11-13-2015, 10:27 AM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
10,323 posts, read 18,664,326 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by m378 View Post
Let me rephrase. Say I'm in a neighborhood built in the 90's and currently assigned to school X. They build a neighborhood of 300 new houses on some land abutting my neighborhood, and school Y opens up a couple miles away. Is it possible that my kids would be reassigned and put into school Y, while the 300 new houses get assigned to school X?

If that's the case, that hardly seems right. I realize "you gotta do what you gotta do", but given the choice of an older neighborhood and a brand new neighborhood, I would hope the newer neighborhood gets the reassign.
What the responses above you (and I do think they understood your question) have said is, "Yes that could happen, fair or not." The solution is to avoid living in areas with lots of new construction or even farmland that could (and most likely WILL) soon become new construction.
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Old 11-13-2015, 11:57 AM
 
830 posts, read 1,484,056 times
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They did this exact thing to us this year - I was in a Holly Springs neighborhood established in the 90's - one of the "older" subdivisions in HS. We got redistricted to Apex Friendship High while newer neighborhoods, and neighborhoods that weren't even built yet - were assigned to Holly Springs High. (Some of those neighborhoods are actually in Fuquay Varina). We ended up moving so that our daughter could stay at Holly Springs High (she was a Freshman at the time) and now our 3rd grader is being redistricted to a new elementary school next school year!!! So you can't win for trying....
So it does depend on where you chose to live as to how much you could be affected by redistricting.
Having said all that, we did move a little ourselves, so our kids have attended Reedy Creek Elementary, Rand Road Elementary and Holly Springs Elementary. Holly Ridge Middle and Holly Springs High - and ALL have been great schools! I'm sure Apex Friendship High is a great school too (we just didn't want to switch!)
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Old 11-19-2015, 10:24 AM
 
Location: Cary, NC
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We've been here 4 years and my 3 kids have never been forcibly reassigned. My daughter was redistricted at one point as a 4th grader, but grandfathered into her same school. However, we are in an area of South Cary with established neighborhoods and not a lot of new construction.

Here is my unvarnished opinion of the Wake County schools.

The Good:

Lots of school choices. You can find a school that fits your schedule and your kid, although you have to be "in the system" a year before applying for a magnet school. I feel like we've been able to make the most of the options here, and my kids are getting some incredible opportunities as a result.

The Bad:

Underfunding!! This isn't Wake County as much as NC, but teachers are leaving by the droves (it is very noticeable in some schools; less so in others -- my kids have been in 4 different schools now at all levels, and the impact has ranged from hardly noticeable to near-full turnover in 2 years.) That said, some of it probably IS Wake County, which seems to give funding priority to a bloated central administration (anyone who has had to escalate something through them will probably know what I mean). I was shocked when the HS biology teacher passed a jar at parents' night for money for test tubes, but that is reality. (The same classroom has a DNA splitter donated by industry; go figure.) You will be nickel-and-dimed and asked for donations out the wazoo: book purchases (because the classrooms don't have enough), "bring your own device" (rough translation: not enough computers), expensive field trips (in comparison with the 2 other school districts we've been in up north), and donations of classroom supplies (anything and everything).

The Ugly:

TRANSPORTATION. Yes, it's taxpayer-funded, in comparison to the buses up north which carried user fees of $600-800/year per student. But, it is also flaky. Some routes are extremely reliable. Others are horrendous. Unfortunately, the system for complaints is designed to discourage parents from complaining.

They do not deal well, not at ALL, with accommodating divorced parents, with or without joint custody, or any sort of guardianship situation.

**
All told, we've had really good experiences with the Wake County schools so far, albeit with a fair dose of frustration with "The Ugly", but I'm more than a little worried about their future unless something changes at the state level.
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