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Raleigh, Durham, Chapel Hill, Cary The Triangle Area
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Old 10-04-2018, 08:48 AM
 
65 posts, read 25,306 times
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Raleigh is RET. Research. Education. Technology.
Charlotte has been described as the three B's. Banks, Bubbas and Bibles.

At the end of the day, anyone trying to make a determination on which area is best for them to live and relocate probably care most about that over GDP. Which would also probably explain why the Triangle region's growth rate is faster than the Charlotte region's growth rate when comparing two comparably sized metropolitan regions within the same state.

 
Old 10-04-2018, 08:53 AM
 
Location: Charlotte
609 posts, read 1,014,883 times
Reputation: 466
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sebastian14A View Post
Raleigh is RET. Research. Education. Technology.
Charlotte has been described as the three B's. Banks, Bubbas and Bibles.

At the end of the day, anyone trying to make a determination on which area is best for them to live and relocate probably care most about that over GDP. Which would also probably explain why the Triangle region's growth rate is faster than the Charlotte region's growth rate when comparing two comparably sized metropolitan regions within the same state.

At the end of the day, people making the determination of which area is best for them to live and relocate probably care most about that than nerdwallets 2016 article of best places to live, or amazons 17th place pick. This is probably why Myrtle Beach regions growth rate is faster than Raleigh regions growth rate when comparing two fast growing, southern boom towns within sister states.
 
Old 10-04-2018, 09:44 AM
 
6,800 posts, read 4,363,143 times
Reputation: 5345
Here's the deal, both cities (counties technically) have well performing, diversified economies. The juvenile, sophomoric insults are just dumb, and much of it defies reality.

Mecklenburg County has about 1.4 jobs. A few selected categories:

Manufacturing 67K
Information 48K
Finance/Insurance 128K
Prof/Tech Services 116K
Educational Services 73K
Public Adm. 36K
Management of
Companies and
Enterprises 61K

Wake has about 1.1 million jobs.

Manufacturing 52K
Information 43K
Finance/Insurance 41K
Prof/Tech Services 117K
Educational Services 91K
Public Adm. 83K
Management of
Companies and
Enterprises 20K

Both counties have significant, and varied, employment sectors...manufacturing, finance, services, technology, etc.

https://d4.nccommerce.com/
 
Old 10-04-2018, 10:17 AM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, NC, formerly DC and Phila
8,555 posts, read 12,619,006 times
Reputation: 8315
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sebastian14A View Post
Nope. Source: Wikipedia Research Triangle. See the map on the page. Cumberland County is not included in the Triangle's CSA. Population 2.2 million.
Yes, they updated the CSAs. Your source is out of date. Here are the new MSA and CSA data as of September 14, 2018. See pages 130 and 146 for the Fayetteville and Raleigh CSAs. The Durham MSA data is on page 53, Fayetteville MSA on page 54 and the Raleigh MSA on page 67.

Fayetteville CSA includes:
Fayetteville MSA (Cumberland, Harnett, and Hoke Counties)
Laurinburg Micropolitan
Lumberton Micro
Pinehurst-Southern Pines Micro
Sanford Micro

Raleigh CSA includes:
Durham-Chapel Hill MSA (Chatham, Durham, Granville, Orange, and Person Counties)
Henderson Micro
Raleigh-Cary MSA (Franklin, Johnston, and Wake Counties)

https://www.whitehouse.gov/wp-conten...etin-18-04.pdf

And the thread about it on city-data in the general US forum (posts 4, 91, and 97 discuss it):

It's here! OMB releases new Bulletin No. 18-04, Revised MSA/CSA Delineations

Last edited by michgc; 10-04-2018 at 10:40 AM..
 
Old 10-04-2018, 10:20 AM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, NC, formerly DC and Phila
8,555 posts, read 12,619,006 times
Reputation: 8315
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trent Y View Post
Do you remember which counties? Because I also heard Durham's MSA gained a county. And since Durham and Rakeigh are the same CSA it may have evened out.
I believe Oxford moved from Raleigh to Durham, so that did not change the Raleigh CSA. The ones that did move out of the Raleigh CSA were Dunn and Sanford, I think.

Last edited by michgc; 10-04-2018 at 10:41 AM..
 
Old 10-04-2018, 12:30 PM
 
550 posts, read 305,007 times
Reputation: 477
Quote:
Originally Posted by carolinablue View Post
Yep. Article from Triangle area for reference.

https://www.bizjournals.com/triangle...145&j=83897111

From the article: "The 2017 GMP numbers are in from the Bureau of Economic Analysis, and the trend lines show the Charlotte MSA continues to contribute more to the country's Gross Domestic Product (GDP) than any other North Carolina metro. For Raleigh, however, things cooled off considerably since the 2016 numbers came out. Raleigh's real Gross Metropolitan Product (GMP) clocked in at $72.6 billion — up 2.7 percent from 2016 numbers, and enough to rank the metro 93rd in terms of GMP growth. In 2016, the Raleigh-Cary MSA GMP grew 3.7 percent. In contrast, the Charlotte-Concord-Gastonia MSA registered a GMP of $146 billion, up 3.5 percent from the year before. The percent growth ranked the Queen City as the 49th fastest in the nation. GMP growth for the Durham-Chapel Hill MSA was non-existent last year. In fact, there was a minuscule drop in the value ($43.4 billion) between 2016 and 2017.""
Trying to compare these cities based on GDP, or GMP for that matter, is basically a pointless exercise. This is not an apples to apples comparison model.

GDP is typically calculated by the formula GDP = C + G + I + NX.

C is equal to all private consumption, or consumer spending, in a nation's economy, G is the sum of government spending, I is the sum of all the country's investment, including businesses capital expenditures and NX is the nation's total net exports, calculated as total exports minus total imports (NX = Exports - Imports).

The biggest variables are C and NX. Since Charlotte has a greater population, that C value will help drive up the GDP more so than the C value for Raleigh. Furthermore, the NX value for a city heavily based on manufacturing will also contribute substantially to its overall GDP.

Charlotte has a greater population and manufacturing/export base than Raleigh, therefore you would expect it to have a higher overall GDP.
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