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Old 11-04-2019, 01:15 AM
 
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OP, do you have a wood stove, or an open draft fireplace?

If it's the latter, don't bother finding more wood than you'd use for an occaisional decorative fire, especially one you don't want to tend the whole time it's burning.

As in, donr't consider an open fireplace (glass doored or no) a viable heaing source.
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Old 11-04-2019, 04:59 AM
 
Location: Cary, NC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lycaon pictus View Post
Thank you everyone for all the information! Someone I know offered to let me take some fallen logs from their yard, but I suppose since that wood isn't seasoned, it wouldn't be a good idea to burn it this winter?

I've found a few people selling seasoned firewood on nextdoor and craigslist, and others giving away wood pallets, or just random wood in their yard. Are those things safe to burn indoors?

I will definitely check out the state farmer's market. I can't believe I didn't think to check there before!

Vendors at the farmer's market and elsewhere will tell you their wood is seasoned and dry, when it really is green as grass. It is a quick buck business.



Pick up a split piece of hardwood by one end.
Tap it onto pavement vertically and fairly hard.
Dry wood will have a "ring" to it when it hits.
Green wood will give a dull thump.

Or, get a moisture meter as Vorpal says. Better yet, buy now for next winter. It takes months of air drying for good oak or hickory to season.


https://www.motherearthnews.com/home...s-ze0z1411zdeh


" With a little practice, however, you can use the following tips to judge accurately for yourself whether your wood is dry. Use as many as you can for the best results.
Radial checking. Look for cracks and checks in the end grains that radiate out from the heartwood to the sapwood. These appear before the wood is totally seasoned, so your testing should not stop here.
Color. Wood fades and darkens as it seasons, changing from white or cream to yellow or gray. Different species have different colors and shades, but it’s safe to say a stack of bright, freshly colored wood is far from seasoned.
Smell. Split a piece and sniff; if the exposed, fresh-cut surface has a pleasant, sappy aroma (or if it feels damp and cool), it’s too wet to burn.
Loose bark. As wood dries, the bark slowly begins to separate from the wood and eventually falls away. If the bark is still attached to the wood, peel it back with a sharp knife and check the cambium. If the cambium is green, so is the wood. A cord of seasoned wood should have more wood without bark than bark-covered wood.
Listen. Bang two pieces of wood together. Dry wood sounds hollow; wet wood sounds dull.
Lift. Seasoned wood weighs much less than green wood of the same species.
Trial by fire. If in doubt, burn some! Dry firewood ignites and burns easily; wet wood is tough to light and hisses in the fire."
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Old 11-04-2019, 07:10 AM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lycaon pictus View Post
and others giving away wood pallets, or just random wood in their yard. Are those things safe to burn indoors?

Most of the pallets I have seen are made of oak, which of course is great to burn. The problem with pallets is all the nails, which can be a pain to pull out. I guess you could wait and pick the nails out of the ashes.
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Old 11-04-2019, 09:06 AM
 
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There is one guy on Hickory Grove Church rd that sells firewood. You can see a pile by his house. Another guy on leesville rd near the intersection of Andrew's chapel.

I remember as a boy my parents getting logs from neighbors that didn't want them, or from the woodlot behind the house. My father would split the logs and dry them. We would burn them in an open fireplace to heat that particular room.

I would try to avoid using much pine, especially non seasoned. Pine burns dirty, fast and hot which is not ideal. Builds up in your chimney. Hardwoods or even nonresiny softwoods are best such as maple, oak, locust, poplar, etc.
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Old 11-04-2019, 09:11 AM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
5,137 posts, read 6,382,237 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by don6170 View Post
Most of the pallets I have seen are made of oak, which of course is great to burn. The problem with pallets is all the nails, which can be a pain to pull out. I guess you could wait and pick the nails out of the ashes.
Aren't pallets usually made of wood treated with chemicals?
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Old 11-04-2019, 09:36 AM
 
Location: Carolina Shores NC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zitsky View Post
Aren't pallets usually made of wood treated with chemicals?
I don’t think so...mostly hardwoods.
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Old 11-04-2019, 09:57 AM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Poggly Woggly View Post
I don’t think so...mostly hardwoods.
I guess the answer is... it depends. Some wood is treated.


Quote:
Generally, pallets are safe to burn in fireplaces, although those that are treated with the fumigant methyl bromide (labeled with the initials MB) are unsafe to burn.
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Old 11-04-2019, 12:42 PM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
3,647 posts, read 4,332,443 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Backwoods Baptist View Post
I would try to avoid using much pine, especially non seasoned. Pine burns dirty, fast and hot which is not ideal. Builds up in your chimney. Hardwoods or even nonresiny softwoods are best such as maple, oak, locust, poplar, etc.

Here is an interesting article on the topic of pine vs other woods.
https://homeguides.sfgate.com/burnin...ove-48601.html
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Old 11-04-2019, 02:31 PM
 
Location: Raleigh
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vorpal View Post
Well you can bust up the pallets for kindling. As for random wood/logs in the yard....you need to find out how long it's been there and if it needs to be split. The logs might not fit in your fireplace. Again, you don't want to burn wood that hasn't had time to dry out yet. If the wood is still green, you can still get it, stack it somewhere, and burn it next winter. There's moisture meters you can buy on Amazon for about $20 that you can use to test the moisture content of firewood. You don't want to burn any wood that has over 25% moisture content. If somebody is selling seasoned firewood at a reasonable price, I would jump on it because it won't be around long. And if you don't have a pickup or trailer, you'll need to rent one or find out if they deliver.
I’d just throw a tarp over it for a couple months to let it dry. Stack in on a pallet or something to keep air moving around it.

I’d agree if your making fine furniture but if your burning it in the fireplace and it’s had time, why obsess.

Dead wood in the yard is most often from dead branches and burns well IME.
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Old 11-04-2019, 02:47 PM
 
Location: Carolina Shores NC
7,007 posts, read 8,346,861 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by don6170 View Post
Here is an interesting article on the topic of pine vs other woods.
https://homeguides.sfgate.com/burnin...ove-48601.html
My grandmother didn’t burn anything but pine in her cookstove. It started fast and got the heat up fast for cooking. My uncle kept a huge pile or seasoned pine right outside the kitchen door. She liked it cut and split about the size of rolled up newspaper. My uncle started the wood heater with pine and loaded it with hardwood.
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