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Old 05-12-2008, 07:15 AM
 
551 posts, read 1,511,503 times
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Default Peaches!

We have a wonderful peach tree, passed on to us by a couple a few owners ago! We have struggled with pests, frost, and pruning, but I think we've got a great crop this year.




A few are getting ripe, so in about two-three weeks, we'll be having peach pie, peach crumble, peach salsa, peach chutney, peach ice cream, etc.,

We also have roses - also passed on to us and I have no idea what to do with them... HELP! This one is kind of a viney bush...not even sure it's a rose, but it sure is prickly!


And I have two of these, both on trellises. There is a third that we're trying to coax back to life.
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Old 05-12-2008, 08:46 AM
 
Location: Piedmont NC
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Default Lovely Spring, no?

Chicky, that prickly, viney, rose looks like a Knockout which should bloom-like-mad for you, but I can't be sure that's what it is. If its growth gets out-of-hand, it can be pruned by about 1/3, and you can trim the dead blooms back to the new growth at any time. Give the roses a systemic pesticide/fertilizer about once a month to every six weeks. The Japanese beetles are out there *somewhere* just looking for an-all-you-can-eat-buffet, and if the roses get out-of-hand and there is not enough air circulation, you will see a fungus on them. They require minimal work -- much less than what I may be leading you to believe.

I also second the jasmine on the chain link fence. If your intentions are to let-it-go, so to speak, to create privacy, the chain link can support the weight of the jasmine, which, over time -- perhaps a few seasons -- will get (by other standards) out-of-hand. It should not die-back too much in the winter months, and will provide a screen year round.

Some people plant ivy and creeping fig, and the like, not aware that while they may like the way it looks, they are going to have to work with it, to keep it contained. My husband and I were trimming creeping fig on the house at least once/week to keep it at the level we wanted it, just under the windows, and away from the doors, and wood. I love the look of it on brick, as well as English ivy, but neither of these are plant-and-forget, especially once they are established and 'happy.'

Be mindful, too, that if the plants are used as ground cover, snakes and critters (if you have an aversion to them) like the cover and the coolness they provide.


With all of the rain, my fescue lawn is sure coming back around, and looks great -- as does most everyone else's. I haven't used the irrigation system -- not once -- since it was deemed OK to begin watering again. Nice.
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Old 05-12-2008, 09:02 AM
 
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RDSLOTS - Thank you! They certainly do bloom like mad. I've been looking at pictures online and I'm not sure it is a knockout - mine have one layer of petals around the outside and a yellow center. I wouldn't even think it was a rose if not for all the thorns! We put up a little trellis and it grew so much in the last month that it tore the trellis down with the weight. It really needs to be cut back - but I don't dare until I positively ID it and am sure it's okay.
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Old 05-12-2008, 09:24 AM
 
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Ok you guys, I'm totally jealous.... The previous owners of our house did not go to great lengths to do anything nice here, we have no curb appeal at all, and gardening was a fun hobby of ours back in CO. So we are building a nice bed for flowers in the front, and pulling out all the juniper (I hate juniper with a passion). I thought to buy a preplanned garden from a catalog but am a little leary of the whole concept. Has anyone done this before? Also, we are going to plant lilacs along one side of the house and build a little veggie patch in the back yard. We saw a bunny there yesterday, so I'm not sure how well that will work out. My daughter says we have to plant carrots for the rabbits, I'm not convinced. We also have a hill in the backyard that is bare, so I am going to load it with bulbs in the fall, and plant a bunch of vinca to make it green. We also have lots of trees, sweet gum? The drop those hard cruncy balls, ouch!
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Old 05-12-2008, 10:15 AM
 
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Oooh, we have a gumball tree. My husband hates it. About twice a year we go through the front yard and try to remove all the gumballs - we fill at least four lawn waste bags and we still leave some behind!
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Old 05-12-2008, 10:20 AM
 
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So..Jasmine?? is it hardy? do they survive the winters?? I thought jasmine is a plant for areas warn through out the year???
where will I get a jasmine plant??
How should we winterize them?
the smell of jasmine is so heavenly!!
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Old 05-12-2008, 03:36 PM
 
Location: Piedmont NC
4,597 posts, read 7,270,151 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicky View Post
RDSLOTS - Thank you! They certainly do bloom like mad. I've been looking at pictures online and I'm not sure it is a knockout - mine have one layer of petals around the outside and a yellow center. I wouldn't even think it was a rose if not for all the thorns! We put up a little trellis and it grew so much in the last month that it tore the trellis down with the weight. It really needs to be cut back - but I don't dare until I positively ID it and am sure it's okay.
Until you positively ID the rose, you can still prune it, if it's gotten out-of-hand. If nothing else, you can snip the old blooms, just back to the new growth. If you study a rose, you'll notice new growth comes from the old, where the leaves sort of split. You can prune the clusters of dead blooms without causing any problems at all. I think I know what you are describing. My neighbor has them, and they are lovely. The pesticide/fertilizer I use is Bayer, and I mix it in a watering can, following the directions, and apply it when the plant is thirsty.
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Old 05-12-2008, 03:43 PM
 
Location: Piedmont NC
4,597 posts, read 7,270,151 times
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Default Asian jasmine? or start jasmine, perhaps?

Quote:
Originally Posted by relocary View Post
So..Jasmine?? is it hardy? do they survive the winters?? I thought jasmine is a plant for areas warn through out the year???
where will I get a jasmine plant??
How should we winterize them?
the smell of jasmine is so heavenly!!
Depends upon the jasmine. The variety I prefer is a vine with small waxy, dark green leaves. In extreme cold, the leaves turn a bronze, but even when it snowed, which is unusual, it didn't die back. The flower is a small, sweet-smelling white bloom.

It will easily take over after a few years, and needs support -- a fence, wire, and the like. We grew it up the brick columns and across the top support of a side porch (not on the brick, but on the supporting wire, as it's not a cling-to-the-brick like ivy type of vine). It provided a nice, green year round screen, and was beautiful up against the brick. At another house, we planted it along a fence outside the bedroom windows -- the smell wafting in through the windows was heavenly.

Most any plant stores or nurseries carry the vine. I'm not sure, however, if I have seen it at Lowe's and/or Home Depot, and the like, but it could be they didn't have it in when I was there. Most local nurseries will know what you are talking about, and will help you find some. You don't need much to get started -- plant some on one side of the fence, at the end of the fence, and repeat on the other side if you need to, or want to.

Happy planting!
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Old 05-14-2008, 08:26 PM
 
Location: Cary, NC
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Great gardens everyone! Let this be our thread. No thread left behind hehe.
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Old 05-14-2008, 08:56 PM
 
Location: Cary, NC
7,276 posts, read 13,932,161 times
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I got my Jasmine vine at a local nursery (Family Garden and Supply Center in Cary) not a home improvement place. I planted it last year and it did survive the winter just fine. It's doing great now. This is the second growing season and just started blooming this week. It's a pretty vine with very sweet smelling flowers. I also don't do much to it at all really; no watering/pruning etc. It just needs a good place for it to wrap itself like a trellis or fence!
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