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Old 05-22-2008, 04:29 PM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
10,323 posts, read 18,660,193 times
Reputation: 11064

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Quote:
And to keep on topic....where the heck *is* West Raleigh?
Generally considered the area near NC State, toward the Fairgrounds, etc. running into Cary, around Hillsborough and Western Blvds. "9 o'clock" on a map.
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Old 05-22-2008, 05:22 PM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, NC
1,105 posts, read 2,419,930 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NChomesomeday View Post
3. And to keep on topic....where the heck *is* West Raleigh?
West of East Raleigh.

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Old 05-23-2008, 06:16 AM
 
103 posts, read 68,882 times
Reputation: 36
It may not be P.C. to actually mention what we notice, but it is important that we know what is around us when we plan on moving to an area. Many parts of NC, including the Triangle area, were and are very poor and run down. Many of these areas are being rebuilt. A case in point is Morrisville. You can drive down the road and see new development everywhere, but right next door will be an old house with the roof falling in or some trailer covered in rust. People should not ignore what is around them, just to seem kind. The fact of the matter is that once you leave the Triangle area, things go downhill really fast. I was shocked how fast and how bad. If one has time to drive around when visiting, they should check areas several miles from where they actually want to move, so they get a good idea of what is around.

It can be an eye opener and a decision changer.
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Old 05-23-2008, 07:27 AM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
11,791 posts, read 27,440,956 times
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I'm sure the same could be said for any area.

Six years ago, Wake Forest was mostly run down trailers and no shopping. Look at it now.

I'm not saying that you shouldn't know what is around you because in an area like ours, growth comes whether we want it or not. Look at the folks in Crenshaw that had woods in their backyard for 18 years and now have the 98 bypass.

The benefit of knowing what is around you is that you can choose where you want to live. If the run down areas of town don't appeal to you...don't live there!

Not to sound mean...

Hubby comes from a small town about an hour away. I actually lived there for a good amount of my youth. However, when we visit, we look at each other and say "we need to go home...FAST"!!!

Vicki
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Old 05-23-2008, 07:36 AM
 
159 posts, read 543,200 times
Reputation: 137
I grew up in Eastern NC, surrounded by some of NC's poorest counties. Back then, at least there were textile mills and tobacco money to infuse the local economies. Now, economic prospects are few and far between. You can map out the economic bright spots in NC very easily. You'll find prosperous parts are quite small compared to the average to below average income areas. Fact of life.

My husband spent many years in the Hudson Valley area of NY. He has often commented on how neat the yards are here. Sure, you have your exceptions, but he is always fascinated how even the tiny box houses or trailers will often have mowed lawns, flower beds, or tidy shelters/wood piles/whatever. He perceives a greater sense of pride here in general, even in the smallest of "estates". I think it's a matter of the lenses you use to look at your surroundings.

I have often told my Triangle associates that life outside the immediate area is very different - that NC is very different. The Triangle is a new version of NC, but it's not the deeply rooted, most common version of NC. That's out there, and you don't have to venture far. But you don't have to be afraid of it either. You may not want to hang out with them, but you'll find the rural natives to be a mostly God-fearing lot of good people. They may not be wordly (but then again, they may be - you'd be surprised!). They may not share your political thoughts, religious or education values, or appreciation for others who are different, but you can find a balance if you're willing. I think it's often a matter of feeling at home in your own skin. You don't have to be "of" them to live among them.


And maybe it's time for West Raleigh to form an identity. Why should North Raleigh or SE Raleigh have all the fun?
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Old 05-23-2008, 08:00 AM
 
Location: suburbiahell
78 posts, read 180,801 times
Reputation: 64
HHHHMMMM- I can understand what you are saying, sort of. However, you seem to enjoy the triangle which seems to be somewhat multicultural or at least made up of those with different backgrounds and from different areas. This is just another part or portion of the area. You might be surprised what you can learn from the people in the area. They know the land and how to make good use of it. As far as a tour guide while in the woods, you could do no better. Before you judge an entire area get to know the people. Yes I am sure there are some jerks in the area just as in any area of the world, but blanket statements are dangerous.

On the other hand, if a rural setting isnt your cup of tea, then dont go there. I am willing to bet that many of those families are just as happy in their life as you are with yours. Money does not equate to happiness.

Have a good day and try to see something from a different perspective. Enjoy the area for what it has instead of what it is lacking.
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Old 05-23-2008, 03:51 PM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
10,323 posts, read 18,660,193 times
Reputation: 11064
Quote:
The Triangle is a new version of NC, but it's not the deeply rooted, most common version of NC. That's out there, and you don't have to venture far.
May I please point out that there are many, many folks in the Triangle who ARE from here, who DO have deep local roots, and who ARE Southern as southern can be steeped in the history of Raleigh and of NC while also being "metropolitan"? We aren't ALL transplants, remember

Raleigh isn't Brigadoon; it didn't materialize out of ether 20 years ago.
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Old 05-23-2008, 06:51 PM
 
Location: Durham, NC
1,232 posts, read 3,407,518 times
Reputation: 604
One person's trash is another person's treasure, as I've heard. And believe. So, though the OP did not like what he saw outside of a certain regional area, he does have a right to his own perspective (not saying that anyone is disagreeing with this either). However, it is a perspective and a subjective one. Who knows, he may have driven by my house built in 1928 and thought it was old and out of date. Well, it is old and out of date, but it's well maintained and priceless to us. However, I can also imagine our house sitting here with the roof caved in, weeds overgrown, old cars rusting out in the back, and the paint peeling (okay, it's already doing that a little) and I would probably concede that our house would then be a dump in our eyes (not that I couldn't see it's potential). Personally, I think most of the new construction I see built with vinyl siding and lack of windows is rather cheap and dumpy. Just a subjective perspective of mine.

However, I look forward to taking drives out and away from the triangle (more frequently before gas prices skyrocketed). I've seen dumps, yes. But I've also seen amazingly humble abodes I would be proud to call home. And truly, if I could afford to not be so close to the city, I would probably live in a more rural area since, in my experience, I have also met some wonderful people living in the country. Haven't met any toothless wonders yet, but I can say I've met a few down in Georgia. Come to think about it, I've met some in California too. And Nevada. Arizona. Washington... well, pretty much everywhere.

Anyway, it's all a matter of perspective and each of us has one. It's cool. As long as subjective perspectives aren't forced upon others as generalized facts, then I find it interesting to figure out what others see with their own eyes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by NChomesomeday View Post
Are you related to North_Raleigh_Guy?
Quote:
Originally Posted by North_Raleigh_Guy View Post
I can answer that. That would be a big NO!
Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeJaquish View Post
Yeah, that's what you say now....
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..
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Jaquish, you crack me up!
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