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Old 01-19-2007, 09:48 PM
 
330 posts, read 1,290,436 times
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Default Raleigh Metro -Conservative or Liberal, does it really matter?

Hi again everybody! I was wondering about this because of other posts I read on a similar subject.

But does it make things difficult for one when it comes to someone's political opinion, or party they choose?

For example someone told me Raleigh Metro is a very Christian Conservative area, now that was very surprising because I thought it was very liberal.

So which is Raleigh Metro? Conservative or Liberal?

So does anybody feel their political views are causing them to lose friends? Or have trouble fitting in?

I hope my post makes sense
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Old 01-20-2007, 03:24 AM
 
Location: Durham, NC
1,560 posts, read 3,149,295 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by amsm196 View Post
Hi again everybody! I was wondering about this because of other posts I read on a similar subject.

But does it make things difficult for one when it comes to someone's political opinion, or party they choose?

For example someone told me Raleigh Metro is a very Christian Conservative area, now that was very surprising because I thought it was very liberal.

So which is Raleigh Metro? Conservative or Liberal?

So does anybody feel their political views are causing them to lose friends? Or have trouble fitting in?

I hope my post makes sense
Your post does make sense. It's also really, really hard to answer. Most places I've lived before had a "character" and it was easy to tell what the politics were. Orlando? Conservative and growing more so. Louisville? Moderate and even slightly liberal in parts. Boston? 'Nuff said.

The "Raleigh metro" is really two of what the Census Bureau calls MSAs (Metropolitan Statistical Areas). On the west side, you have the Durham-Chapel Hill MSA. Chapel Hill is a big college town with a reputation as being politically liberal. Jesse Helms once said the state of North Carolina should have built a fence around Chapel Hill and charged admission instead of building the NC Zoo in Asheboro -- and while he meant it as an insult, I suspect lots of CH'ers take it as a point of pride that they are a liberal community. Durham, CH's neighbor, is much larger and not "as" liberal as Chapel Hill or Carrboro, but still reliably and strongly democratic in overall voting. With Duke University based here, there are many liberal-dominated neighborhoods.

The second MSA is the Raleigh-Cary one, and includes the Wake suburbs, places like Clayton in Johnston County, etc. On net, if you look at things like 2000/2004 election results, I think you would call this area "moderate" or middle of the road -- I think Wake split 51/49 for Bush in '04, which is significantly closer than the tally elsewhere in the state. So-called "Inside the Beltline" areas in Raleigh seem to be more liberal/Democratic leaning. I've perceived that some of the more outlying suburbs, like Clayton, or more distant Wake areas, are more conservative in their politics. I don't live in Wake, so I'd let someone else chime in on this.

In the end, I'd say a few things:

* Overall, people are pretty friendly here no matter what, and you don't see people raging at each other over their politics. I'm pretty liberal, and I hang out frequently with a couple people at my work who have signed photos of Bush up in their cubes. Heck, I get along better with them than with some people in the office who "share my politics!"

* Because this metro area is really several cities... the politics in your town/city/county matters more than some overall "Raleigh-Durham" vibe. I can predict that on the same issue, city councils in Carrboro and Clayton are going to vote differently! If you're really staunchly conservative or liberal, and that matters a whole lot to you in where you live, you can choose one of these communities and know you're in a place where most people will agree with you. (I would argue that this is a problem in American society in general and is contributing to us being polarized, but that's another topic!)

* Would you have problems fitting in or being accepted in a place because of your politics? Maybe... but only at the extreme margins. I mean, people who move to Carrboro -- which has co-housing developments, lots of walkable areas, townhouses/condos, etc. -- know that their town is really designed to appeal to lefties, so if you (say) drove a Hummer into town, people would look at you funny. I'd assume that in the more staunchly conservative areas, the opposite would hold.

But, for most places and most areas in the Triangle... you're going to find people widely accepting of most views. I don't think having a Bush or a Kerry sticker on your car is going to get you shunned or egged anywhere in the area, and ultimately, people are just really pretty friendly here.
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Old 01-20-2007, 08:17 AM
 
Location: Wake County, NC
882 posts, read 653,339 times
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Bull City Rising said it well ...

I am fairly conservative leaning towards the middle of the road ...

... but I am ALSO into things like animal rescue and rehab (which tends to be more of a Liberal thing)

... then again ... animals be ware .... I will shoot edible meat! LOL

Basically; people are people!
Some are good - some aren't ... doesn't have ANYTHING to do with being one or the other ...

fact is: I tend to be a bit of butt (on purpose) since I like animals better than people .... especially when smoked with hickory!
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Old 01-20-2007, 10:41 AM
 
251 posts, read 764,108 times
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That's a really great post, Bull City.

I'd add that everywhere I've lived in the country people have certain values that are more important to them than others, so the staring just depends on what that particular area happens to find objectionable. Other parts of the country are no different from the South in that regard.

You mentioned that in the Triangle "you're going to find people widely accepting of most views."

I think the emphasis is on most, but definitely not all. And from my experience it's the same everywhere else, whether the region or city is predominantly secular fundamentalist or conservative traditionalist.

Last edited by Skipstone; 01-20-2007 at 11:13 AM..
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Old 01-20-2007, 12:34 PM
 
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Orlando is growing more liberal, not more conservative. The city has passed a gay rights law and has a gay elected official now, which would have been unheard of just a decade ago. There is a very large and growing gay population there, and the city even is developing a gay section of town. Just about any city that is growing is becoming more socially liberal, not conservative, including Raleigh and Orlando.
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Old 01-20-2007, 02:14 PM
 
251 posts, read 764,108 times
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I know crime has dramatically increased there which is really sad. I have fond memories of visiting an aunt in Orlando when I was younger. Lake Eola was a favorite place to go back in those days and you felt safe. Such a beautiful place.

Anyway, regarding your comments you are undoubtedly right about Orlando, but I don't see any stats showing this to be the case in most other cities around the country.

Over half the states in America have passed the Marriage Amendment so that is not a trend towards more secular fundamentalism.

Also a UC Berkeley study found that more and more young people are becoming more traditionally conservative than their own parents. I suspect it's partially a matter of learning from seeing their parent's experiences. As one example, in the 1950s there were only around five venereal diseases whereas today there are over 30. I suspect these young people will become even more conservative as they get older.

Florida is a unique state in many ways. There are a lot of things happening in cities there that aren't happening in most other states and/or cities. Ten miles inland in Ft. Lauderdale women in nothing but thongs stand along roadsides selling hot dogs. You won't see that in most other cities of the country. Florida has a different moral climate so I'm not sure much of anything there can be gauged as a model of what's happening in other areas.

But that's just my take on it, Tarheel. You're entitled to an opinion the same as I am. Time will tell.

Last edited by Skipstone; 01-20-2007 at 02:43 PM..
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Old 01-20-2007, 07:16 PM
 
Location: Durham, NC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tarheelhombre View Post
Orlando is growing more liberal, not more conservative. The city has passed a gay rights law and has a gay elected official now, which would have been unheard of just a decade ago. There is a very large and growing gay population there, and the city even is developing a gay section of town. Just about any city that is growing is becoming more socially liberal, not conservative, including Raleigh and Orlando.
Huh, interesting. Thanks for clarifying. Though I have family in the area I haven't been spending too much time there, and I may have been biased by the Ostalkawiecz/Martinez mayoral run a few years back and the spate of right-wing talkers on the radio. (What ever happened to good 'ol Clive Thomas and Peter Rocchio, anyway?) Appreciate the update!
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Old 01-20-2007, 09:11 PM
 
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Good ole Clive?

Quote:
When Press Broadcasting took over WWNZ-AM 740 and WTKS-FM 104.1, all the hosts from WWNZ moved over to "104.1" except Clive. Press said they couldn't come to terms with Thomas; Thomas said he was fired-because his politics were too liberal. Clive would try his own show on a another Orlando station, but would not have the same success.
Wonder why those right-wing talk radio guys bring in more money for the stations?

Even in places like Orlando.

Ever listen to Bill LuMaye here in Raleigh? Lots and lots of traditionalist conservative listeners.

Or how about Jerry Agar? He was so right-wing that he made the big-time and now airs in the evenings on WABC Radio, the largest station in the nation out of New York. Signals as far as South America and Hawaii.

Why do you suppose so many people want to listen to a station like that? Especially airing people like Sean Hannity, Laura Ingraham, Rush, Mark Levin, and on and on.

Life's the pits, isn't it.

Amsm196, you've asked an interesting question for sure and Bull City Rising and Tarheel have brought up a fascinating topic: talk radio.

Well, considering WPTF radio (Raleigh's top station) doesn't have quite the same listening range as WABC out of New York - but that it covers mostly North Carolina - and that the director continues hiring strong conservative media talk show hosts - I'd say that gives some indication of which direction people living here lean.

Money does talk afterall.

And if you've heard Bill LuMaye, he's very polite.
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Old 01-20-2007, 09:23 PM
 
Location: Durham, NC
1,560 posts, read 3,149,295 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Skipstone View Post
Well, considering WPTF radio (Raleigh's top station) doesn't have quite the same listening range as WABC out of New York - but that it covers mostly North Carolina - and that the director continues hiring strong conservative media talk show hosts - I'd say that gives some indication of which direction people living here lean.
Hey Skipstone,

'PTF is #1 in Raleigh? I know it's the #1 AM station, but I thought it was #6 overall (tied with WYMY) in the Arbitrons/Arbitrends? Will also be curious to see how WUNC does once the Arbitrons start including non-comm stations in the coming rounds. Once heard an estimate it was in the top 5 in the metro, but will be real curious how it actually does since I don't think anyone has a good estimate about it.

Yikes... I confess... I'm a radio geek (who spends a lot more time on XM than AM or FM these days to boot!) Sorry for straying so far off topic here....
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Old 01-20-2007, 09:34 PM
 
251 posts, read 764,108 times
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I thought we were talking about Clive and talk radio?

Btw, do you frequent another board using the name of Sidetracker? Seems I've talked with you before.

Been fun talking. I'll dial in here again later. ;o)
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