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Old 11-10-2008, 01:09 PM
 
Location: Papillion
2,584 posts, read 9,359,205 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lanyu View Post
I'm not living in the states yet but I would definately want it vented outside its not only about the gas what about all the steam when boiling potato and veg etc the house would become condensated and would eventually damage decor etc.

Same as bathroom's with showers
This really depends on the humidity in the area you live... if you are in a dry climate this can be very benefitial in raising the humidity level of the home - in our area we actually add humidifiers to the furnace systems to put it into the indoor air during the winter.
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Old 11-10-2008, 01:20 PM
 
Location: Shreveport LA
28 posts, read 80,951 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave1215 View Post
This really depends on the humidity in the area you live... if you are in a dry climate this can be very benefitial in raising the humidity level of the home - in our area we actually add humidifiers to the furnace systems to put it into the indoor air during the winter.
Just goes to show how much I know about NC I guess its a way of finding things out at the same time thank you
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Old 11-10-2008, 01:30 PM
 
Location: Papillion
2,584 posts, read 9,359,205 times
Reputation: 884
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lanyu View Post
Just goes to show how much I know about NC I guess its a way of finding things out at the same time thank you
I applogize, just realized that this was in the NC specific forum... I don't know if that's a true statement for NC (I'm in the middle of the US - far from NC)...
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Old 06-29-2010, 11:57 AM
 
1 posts, read 7,537 times
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I have a new gas range hood. Do I have to vent it to the outside? Is it required to vent by code?
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Old 06-29-2010, 12:32 PM
 
98 posts, read 256,271 times
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This is overkill but I do know alot about NC rules and regulations-this is from the 2009 NC building code amendments


501.8 Equipment not required to be vented. The following listed appliances shall not be required to be vented. 1. Ranges. 2. Built-in domestic cooking units listed and marked for optional venting. 3. Hot plates and laundry stoves. 4. Type 1 clothes dryers (Type 1 clothes dryers shall be exhausted in accordance with the requirements of Section 613). 5. A single booster-type automatic instantaneous water heater, where designed and used solely for the sanitizing rinse requirements of a dishwashing machine, provided that the heater is installed in a commercial kitchen having a mechanical exhaust system. Where installed in this manner, the draft hood, if required, shall be in place and unaltered and the draft hood outlet shall be not less than 36 inches (914 mm) vertically and 6 inches (152 mm) horizontally from any surface other than the heater. 6. Refrigerators. 7. Counter appliances. 8. Room heaters listed for unvented use. 9. Direct-fired make-up air heaters. 10. Other equipment listed for unvented use and not provided with flue collars. 11. Specialized equipment of limited input such as laboratory burners and gas lights. Where the appliances and equipment listed in Items 5 through 11 above are installed so that the aggregate input rating exceeds 20 British thermal units (Btu) per hour per cubic feet (207 watts per m3) of volume of the room or space in which such appliances and equipment are installed, one or more shall be provided with venting systems or other approved means for conveying the vent gases to the outdoor atmosphere so that the aggregate input rating of the remaining unvented appliances and equipment does not exceed the 20 Btu per hour per cubic foot (207 watts per m3) figure. Where the room or space in which the equipment is installed is directly connected to an-other room or space by a doorway, archway, or other opening of comparable size that cannot be closed, the volume of such adjacent room or space shall be permitted to be included in the calculations.
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Old 02-12-2011, 06:47 AM
 
1 posts, read 7,213 times
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Default no co

No. Very little to no co is produced. It is 100% safe, as long as you aren't burning the food. I'm sure the wannabe code makers would love to force everyone to follow their distorted beliefs but they do make ventless fireplaces that suck up way more gas than a stovetop does. But if there is a vent to somewhere, don't blow it into floors or the crawl or attic or into the pan cupboard. And definately have a co detector in the house. Oh wait, the local morons around here are now forcing you to buy one detector for the outside of any room that could be used as a bed room...our local code people need to get reminded of common sense here shortly or need to get fired.
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Old 02-12-2011, 07:02 AM
 
Location: Raleigh
542 posts, read 1,333,788 times
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Building a code minimum home means that you're building the worst possible house that the law allows. I'm sure most people would prefer to live in homes that are "better than code" concerning health and safety and energy efficiency. I know I would. Although it is true that a gas burning stove and house vented fireplaces that are operating properly produces very little CO, that is not the case if the stove or the house vented fireplace are not maintained properly. Also, there are other byproducts of the combustion process including water vapor and NOX. While the increased water vapor produced by house vented combustion appliances will probably not cause moisture related issues in large older homes that are leaky, the water vapor can and does cause moisture related problems in new small homes that are relatively air tight.

Mike
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Old 02-12-2011, 08:50 AM
 
Location: Cary
2,466 posts, read 2,826,852 times
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Regardless of the code, if you have a gas range or fireplace get some battery powered CO2 sensors for the house. I know that you are not supposed to place them in the garage but since I work out there and my gas furnaces is out there, I have one installed. We have to remove it if we use the gas blower to get the debris off the floor. Kids track in a ton of dirt
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Old 02-12-2011, 10:21 AM
 
Location: Near Falls Lake
2,297 posts, read 1,675,948 times
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Ranges can be one of the primary culprits of high carbon monoxide levels in a home. Reason being, unlike the furnace, as long as it appears to be working most people never have it tested or serviced. While a vent to the outside is not technically required, wouldn't it make sense to send the products of combustion to the outside???? Even with a vent to the exterior a "good" carbon monoxide detector is strongly recommended! (do your research on detectors-some good and many are not)
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Old 02-12-2011, 12:06 PM
 
622 posts, read 1,485,573 times
Reputation: 515
We were in our last house for 12 years with a gas range and oven (used daily) and an OTR microwave with just the recirculating vent. The only problem was some greasy build-up on the white cabinets above the microwave. Never set off the CO detector.

New house here with a pro cooktop (much higher BTU output) and we have an appropriately-sized outside-vented hood to go with it. I thought it was code....maybe it's only the regular gas ranges that don't require it by code?
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