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Old 02-14-2011, 07:52 AM
 
1,118 posts, read 1,968,794 times
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The vent only helps if you actually use it anyways... I never turn mine on, and most people's homes that I visit, I've never noticed them running it while cooking either.
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Old 02-14-2011, 09:53 AM
 
Location: Holly Springs
3,861 posts, read 9,273,111 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by carcrazy67 View Post
Ranges can be one of the primary culprits of high carbon monoxide levels in a home. Reason being, unlike the furnace, as long as it appears to be working most people never have it tested or serviced. While a vent to the outside is not technically required, wouldn't it make sense to send the products of combustion to the outside???? Even with a vent to the exterior a "good" carbon monoxide detector is strongly recommended! (do your research on detectors-some good and many are not)
+1
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Old 09-11-2012, 12:41 AM
 
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Two comments to add:

What about just opening windows (and doors)? That should be a workaround to vent out CO, steam, & odors. May not work as well as a range vent but still works, and most kitchens have a window.

And if we're talking about newly built homes, would have been best that you bought or ordered it before the house was built because with a good builder, you have options on whether to vent the range or not. They just charge a fee if you wanted it vented outside.
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Old 09-11-2012, 06:32 PM
 
Location: Raleigh
542 posts, read 1,333,974 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by daluu View Post
Two comments to add:

What about just opening windows (and doors)? That should be a workaround to vent out CO, steam, & odors. May not work as well as a range vent but still works, and most kitchens have a window.

And if we're talking about newly built homes, would have been best that you bought or ordered it before the house was built because with a good builder, you have options on whether to vent the range or not. They just charge a fee if you wanted it vented outside.
One thought to add. Without wind and/or a pressure difference between inside and outside, there little to no air being exchanged between the inside and outside of the house. Fans vented to the outside work because they create pressure differences. A vented fan in a home with or without a gas range is the prudent thing to do.

Michael
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Old 05-09-2015, 07:39 PM
 
1 posts, read 1,073 times
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Default Confused

Please help. I live in a queens ny apartment for over 15 years, ther is a stove hood with an exhaust fan that is not vented, is this a code violation?
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Old 05-10-2015, 07:10 AM
 
Location: Morrisville, NC
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Probably not, according to the codes used in most of the U.S. however, NYC has some additional codes above that as well so asking around the NY forums might be more useful.
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Old 05-10-2015, 07:24 AM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
1,988 posts, read 3,086,361 times
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While it's a very good idea to have CO detectors, people should also take a minute to understand where household CO comes from.

When Natural Gas burn with air, it's 'ash' is CO2 and water vapor. When 100% of the full is burned, there are no other byproducts. It is a 'clean' fuel.
Carbon Monoxide is generated when there is INCOMPLETE combustion of the fuel. IE: as it burns, for some reason the fire can't obtain enough oxygen to burn ALL the fuel. It's "starved" of O2.

On first thought, you'd think that any CO is bad, so you'd want to adjust your burners to provide enough air to burn 100.00% of the fuel. But excess air provided to a fire will cool that flame, thus efficiency is reduced. IE: You have to burn more fuel for the same heat generated. ($$)

Typically, household appliances are adjusted to make just a little bit of CO, which is expected to be diluted by natural leakage with the outside. (This is why you shouldn't heat your house with your stove/oven, as that small CO will build up over time, exceeding the dilution capability).

Compared to a furnace or space heater, range/stoves have burners which are much less complex, and therefor much less likely to be 'out of tune' and cause incomplete combustion. That's why Building Codes (the legal MINIMUM level of design, not the best or most efficient or most safe level), say range/stoves don't need to be vented. (Unless their manufacturer's say they do).

CDC - Carbon Monoxide Poisoning - Frequently Asked Questions
Unintentional Carbon Monoxide Poisonings in Residential Settings -- Connecticut, November 1993-March 1994
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Old 05-10-2015, 08:24 AM
 
9,198 posts, read 21,155,718 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by N.Kaghat View Post
Have it vent outside, to be on the safe side, for sure!
There is no meaningful safety issue and thousands upon thousands of homes have gas ranges without external ventilation.

Personally, I would want a vented range hood and installed one in my home in place of the recirculating micro-hood. But I did it for ventilation of heat, grease and odors, not because of any safety concern.
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Old 09-09-2016, 02:34 PM
 
2 posts, read 897 times
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Hi all, does anyone know if the town of Chapel Hill will require a vent hood even though its not mandated by NC fire code? I had been trying to reach the fire specialist at the town but have not been able to. Will keep trying.
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Old 09-09-2016, 05:29 PM
 
Location: Raleigh NC
7,754 posts, read 6,114,541 times
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this has to rank in the top 10 topics of all time on the Triangle CD Forum.

as to your ? thanirs ... perhaps the internet/google will yield your answer. Chapel Hill is pretty tech-forward. To be sure they have their building codes posted online.
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