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Old 02-05-2009, 02:54 PM
 
Location: Cary
478 posts, read 929,225 times
Reputation: 724
An addendum to this post -- if you're planning to turn in your two-week notice, make sure you've retrieved all personal data from your workstation BEFORE giving notice, since you may not have a chance afterwards.

 
Old 02-05-2009, 06:03 PM
 
Location: Holly Springs, NC
249 posts, read 370,364 times
Reputation: 191
When an employee is courteous enough to give two weeks' notice, the company should either allow them to work or else give them the time with pay. Notice I say should as every time I have left a position for another position, each time, I was told to pack my things immediately. This happened despite no previous difficulty with the employer or what I perceived to be a decent place to work. Yet if you leave without giving notice, they'd be screaming at you anyway IMO. Manners, courtesy, etc. appear to have little or no value in this situation. Good luck with your new job.
 
Old 02-05-2009, 07:31 PM
 
Location: SE Durham
792 posts, read 1,775,577 times
Reputation: 552
This thread is quite strange to me. My dh gave two weeks notice as a formal letter of resignation and worked up until the date he said would be his last day. His supervisor knew it was coming soon so it wasn't a shock. I was always under the impression that if you didn't give the notice, it'd be bad on your employment record and hurt your possibilities with future employment.

There were no hard feelings, ill treatment, etc. His super lost a great employee. There was never any threat that he wouldn't be allowed to finish the two weeks. Could the difference with his situation be because he was a member of a union? It's not easy to get fired at his old job without a union rep backing you. Even if you're dealing with a drug addiction problem, the hospital had to offer you unpaid leave and treatment (covered under the worker's health insurance plan) and they couldn't fire you if you accepted it.
 
Old 02-05-2009, 07:41 PM
 
5,507 posts, read 5,463,198 times
Reputation: 2217
I just told mine I'd be leaving no later than the end of March and I'd give them a solid date once I knew. They were happy for the heads up.
 
Old 02-06-2009, 05:33 AM
 
Location: Southeast US
1,229 posts, read 3,243,422 times
Reputation: 648
Quote:
Originally Posted by mia78 View Post
This thread is quite strange to me. My dh gave two weeks notice as a formal letter of resignation and worked up until the date he said would be his last day. His supervisor knew it was coming soon so it wasn't a shock. I was always under the impression that if you didn't give the notice, it'd be bad on your employment record and hurt your possibilities with future employment.

There were no hard feelings, ill treatment, etc. His super lost a great employee. There was never any threat that he wouldn't be allowed to finish the two weeks. Could the difference with his situation be because he was a member of a union? It's not easy to get fired at his old job without a union rep backing you. Even if you're dealing with a drug addiction problem, the hospital had to offer you unpaid leave and treatment (covered under the worker's health insurance plan) and they couldn't fire you if you accepted it.
Just to address your inquiry to the employment record, most companies limit any employment reference response to dates of employment and possibly salary. It's a legal issue in that the company providing reference doesn't want to be accused of giving false opinions. How exactly does one define a bad employee? So, in many cases, a departure without notice will not hurt your chances of future employment at other companies. It will only come back to haunt you if you want to become re-employed by the company you quit at without notice.
 
Old 02-06-2009, 06:38 AM
 
Location: Durham, North Carolina
319 posts, read 1,018,914 times
Reputation: 186
It really depends on the field you are leaving. When I left my retail job, I gave two weeks notice and worked those days. In the pharmaceutical industry and outside sales, if you are going to a competitor your last day is usually when you tell your employer you are leaving. I have only seen colleagues work their two weeks when they are leaving the industry.
 
Old 02-06-2009, 08:25 AM
 
Location: SE Durham
792 posts, read 1,775,577 times
Reputation: 552
Ohhh, Dana, that does make sense as the pps must have been talking about that specific field where people are leaving for competitors. My dh was resigning with notice in order to move out of state and he didn't want to burn any bridges just in case. It was my understanding that this was across the board. You learn something new everyday. Thanks.
 
Old 02-06-2009, 11:23 AM
 
8,480 posts, read 15,419,795 times
Reputation: 3081
Quote:
Originally Posted by JJingle View Post
Just to address your inquiry to the employment record, most companies limit any employment reference response to dates of employment and possibly salary. It's a legal issue in that the company providing reference doesn't want to be accused of giving false opinions. How exactly does one define a bad employee? So, in many cases, a departure without notice will not hurt your chances of future employment at other companies. It will only come back to haunt you if you want to become re-employed by the company you quit at without notice.
My daughter once worked for a retailer in HR.

She got a question about a former employee whether he left on his own.

It was hard to answer since he left with two Raleigh police officers charged with embezzlement.
 
Old 02-06-2009, 12:51 PM
 
223 posts, read 347,948 times
Reputation: 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by danadana View Post
It really depends on the field you are leaving. When I left my retail job, I gave two weeks notice and worked those days. In the pharmaceutical industry and outside sales, if you are going to a competitor your last day is usually when you tell your employer you are leaving. I have only seen colleagues work their two weeks when they are leaving the industry.

I totally agree with this! If you are in a financial field, sales, chances are, they will ask you to go- they worry about stealing clients, data, etc, etc. If you work in a school or a hospital, chances are, they want you to work as long as possible as it is unlikely they will have a replacement trained and ready to go. I have experienced the expectation that you give the amount of notice that is equal to your vacation pay. Not written in stone but is often requested as a matter of professional courtesy. My former boss knew months before I was leaving and wanted me to train the people taking over my responsibilities and tie up all my loose ends as much as possible. All depends on where you work I guess.
 
Old 02-06-2009, 02:00 PM
 
158 posts, read 301,135 times
Reputation: 153
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bilirubin View Post
No one finds a new girlfriend and then tells the current one "hey, I've found a better opportunity elsewhere, but I'll still date you for 2 weeks." I've tried that in my more youthful, albeit dumber, past. No, you're kicked to the curb toute de suite. Loyalty goes both ways.
I'm having a hard time drawing the lines between the two.
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