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Old 05-16-2009, 10:00 AM
 
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Originally Posted by skaternum View Post
Except that taxes hit the existing residents too, not just the newcomers, which is who John Law is trying to get to pay for this. (And rightly so, in my opinion.)

^^ When did the people who moved here 10 or 15 years ago pay? What about those who came here 30 years ago? Should we go after them and charge compounded interest?

I don't value people based on the size of their wallet. It is disappointing that Mr. Law feels the only people who add value to the area are those who can afford to pay some sort of ridiculous 75% cost of living tax. It is a silly idea really and if in another universe was ever a reality; it would only serve to guarantee that the majority of people who could “afford” to move to this area would be the McMansion crowd the Mr. Law would like to avoid. Seems ironic.
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Old 05-16-2009, 05:47 PM
 
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Originally Posted by skaternum View Post
Except that taxes hit the existing residents too, not just the newcomers, which is who John Law is trying to get to pay for this. (And rightly so, in my opinion.)
And who would decide how much these newcomers would pay? And since taxes and cost of living can differ on county, should these fees have oversight from the state, county, or both? Would this be a one-time fee or would a transplant need to pay for every year they are living here?

What if a person or family would be buying a second home in this area? Would they pay the same amount as a permanent transplant?

In the end, aren't we punishing the transplant for something the towns and officials are allowing to happen? It is the officials who are allowing the land to be zoned in such a way. And then shouldn't we also blame the architects and contracters for designing and building these homes to such grandiose square footage?

Of course, if this were to happen, I believe in would be counter-productive. People wouldn't want to move here due to the cost-of-living fees, therefore less homes would be built since there would be less demand, jobs would be cut in the construction and home industries, and unemployment would rise.

Next, people will be advocating a restriction on births because more people would mean a faster depletion of our resources. Maybe we could file that under cost-of-birth fees.
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Old 05-16-2009, 06:03 PM
 
8,591 posts, read 15,727,084 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kingyouth View Post
And who would decide how much these newcomers would pay? And since taxes and cost of living can differ on county, should these fees have oversight from the state, county, or both? Would this be a one-time fee or would a transplant need to pay for every year they are living here?

What if a person or family would be buying a second home in this area? Would they pay the same amount as a permanent transplant?

In the end, aren't we punishing the transplant for something the towns and officials are allowing to happen? It is the officials who are allowing the land to be zoned in such a way. And then shouldn't we also blame the architects and contracters for designing and building these homes to such grandiose square footage?

Of course, if this were to happen, I believe in would be counter-productive. People wouldn't want to move here due to the cost-of-living fees, therefore less homes would be built since there would be less demand, jobs would be cut in the construction and home industries, and unemployment would rise.

Next, people will be advocating a restriction on births because more people would mean a faster depletion of our resources. Maybe we could file that under cost-of-birth fees.
Actually, totally ending immigration and controlling the birth rate among those unable to support their broods would do a lot to maintain the quality of life all over the USA including NC.
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Old 05-16-2009, 06:17 PM
 
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Originally Posted by saturnfan View Post
Actually, totally ending immigration and controlling the birth rate among those unable to support their broods would do a lot to maintain the quality of life all over the USA including NC.
Ending immigration? So your family were Native Americans?

Controlling birth rate? When did we become China?

I thought people wanted smaller government, not one who would not only tell people where they had to live, but also how many children they could have.
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Old 05-16-2009, 06:35 PM
 
8,591 posts, read 15,727,084 times
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Originally Posted by kingyouth View Post
Ending immigration? So your family were Native Americans?

Controlling birth rate? When did we become China?

I thought people wanted smaller government, not one who would not only tell people where they had to live, but also how many children they could have.
Years ago, we had lots of jobs for newcomers. No more.

Years ago, lots of kids were a plus providing farm help on family farms. It's now a great burden on many families.

Things have changed as we all know.

Zero population growth will save the planet.
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Old 05-16-2009, 07:24 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by saturnfan View Post
Years ago, we had lots of jobs for newcomers. No more.

Years ago, lots of kids were a plus providing farm help on family farms. It's now a great burden on many families.

Things have changed as we all know.

Zero population growth will save the planet.
Creating jobs is a completely different issue. We have gone from an agricultural society to an industrial one. We have not invested the time, energy, and resources in having a competitive education system. We don't teach science and math anymore. Why do you think China and Japan are building robots when we can't even build profitable automobiles? We have decided that it is more important to find people who can build the bigger bomb, not the fastest space ship.

Things have changed. There many opportunities and challenges. But slamming the door in the people who want to live here is not the answer.

Besides, a zero population may save the planet, but it will kill the human species.
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Old 05-16-2009, 07:44 PM
.-.
 
157 posts, read 247,934 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kingyouth View Post
Creating jobs is a completely different issue. We have gone from an agricultural society to an industrial one. We have not invested the time, energy, and resources in having a competitive education system. We don't teach science and math anymore. Why do you think China and Japan are building robots when we can't even build profitable automobiles? We have decided that it is more important to find people who can build the bigger bomb, not the fastest space ship.

Things have changed. There many opportunities and challenges. But slamming the door in the people who want to live here is not the answer.

Besides, a zero population may save the planet, but it will kill the human species.
What goes around comes around. I see us moving back to an agricultural society just for self preservation. If you don't grow it you won't be able to eat.
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Old 05-16-2009, 08:45 PM
 
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Originally Posted by .-. View Post
What goes around comes around. I see us moving back to an agricultural society just for self preservation. If you don't grow it you won't be able to eat.
I thought we are all moving to Michigan? What grows well there?
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Old 05-16-2009, 08:49 PM
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Originally Posted by North_Raleigh_Guy View Post
I thought we are all moving to Michigan? What grows well there?
Go where ever you like.
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Old 05-16-2009, 08:52 PM
 
9,074 posts, read 18,633,913 times
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I like it fine right here.

I just remember you saying a while back that we were all going to move on to a more Manufacturing based economy. And that places like Michigan were better poised for that. Now you say we are going Agricultural. I don't see either of those things happening any time in either of our lifetimes.

But do send us all a postcard from Michigan!
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