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Old 01-21-2010, 05:28 AM
 
Location: Cary, NC
8,264 posts, read 21,816,935 times
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Having "diverse" schools also spreads money and resources. Those people who send their upper class children to schools in lower income neighborhoods are more likely to help support the school, support rennovations, teachers and resources. That is an important aspect as well, even though no one wants to admmit it. It's realy nbot fair to have the lowest income children sit in the odest, most delapidated schools while those in upper income areas get brand new schools with new compters and lab equiptment.
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Old 01-21-2010, 08:00 AM
 
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Originally Posted by lamishra View Post
Having "diverse" schools also spreads money and resources. Those people who send their upper class children to schools in lower income neighborhoods are more likely to help support the school, support rennovations, teachers and resources. That is an important aspect as well, even though no one wants to admmit it. It's realy nbot fair to have the lowest income children sit in the odest, most delapidated schools while those in upper income areas get brand new schools with new compters and lab equiptment.
Right on. People may think that schools get the same money but they don't and heres why: All of the extra money (80% at my school) comes from the fund raisers, athletic events, dances, etc. We know who would win this battle. Seperating these kids not only puts them at a disadvantage but also with equipment and supplies. What teachers would want to go there? Teachers get paid on a salary schedule and not based on their work or what they deal with. So the "good" teachers flock to the higher achieving schools and the principals seek them out.

Now on another note it is hard for someone to be around all these people that they have nothing in common with. It alienates them from their peers. This goes on at all levels. My wife is in one of the highest achieving places ever, finishing up her doctorate in pharmacology but out of all her years in schools the hardest thing wasn't the coursework, or having a baby mid way, it was being around all these people she doesn't have much in common with. It is a daily stress she deals with and has even thought of not finishing b/c she doesn't like it. At least she knows she will be finacially rewarded in the end. What about the kids in grade school, they have no such reward.
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