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Old 01-14-2010, 04:15 PM
 
1,360 posts, read 1,858,935 times
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I agree with everyone whose advice is to wait for the reasons given. I believe it will be better for everyone concerned. My birthday was in October and I had to wait a year. It was fine with me; I liked being at home. I did very well in school. I learned how to read before I went to school and I didn't go to preschool.

My daughter did not heed my advice to wait with her son. IMHO, he should have waited a year. Some may not want to hear it, but boys are usually behind girls developmentally anyway so to me, it's worse to send a boy than it would be to send a girl before the age of 5....but I vote to wait a year whether it's a boy or a girl.

lyssy: Does your son really KNOW (mastery) what they have been trying to teach him in the school he has been attending? Have you considered a Montessori school? I don't think the population will be continuing to have rapid growth anytime soon--the economy is in a slump--appears the growth has reached a plateau.

There is too much sending kids to the next grade for social reasons when they don't make the grade academically. Maybe that's why they're talking (Charlotte thread) about people in their 20's in CMS still without a high school diploma. Unless the law has changed, you aren't required to send your child to school until age 7 (NC).
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Old 01-14-2010, 05:34 PM
 
Location: Cary, NC
91 posts, read 155,205 times
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I agree with many of the previous posters, I think it is wiser to be prepared to wait a year, and you will know when they are 4 in preschool what the best direction is. Preschool teachers will help with that too.
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Old 01-14-2010, 06:25 PM
 
1,226 posts, read 1,982,797 times
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I struggled with the same issue, but in a different county (in NC). While I agree that boys should be held back, my daughter with the close cutt off is just going to be bored silly, as my other daughter, who was one of the youngest, entered Kindergarten reading fluently and well ahead of others, and was made to just sit around and wait.
If you are indeed wanting to get him tested, to at least honestly determine if he is advanced enough, you will be able to get him tested for free by the county (skip the school level, they are clueless, go straight to the county). While they don't 'formally' test for gifted until 3rd grade, they are required by state law to provide testing at a parent's request for ALL grade levels. The testing is very difficult, they need to score at about above 70% of the NEXT grade level. So he would have to pretty much know all that first grade has to offer him.
I had my daughter tested while in kindergarten, just so that they could pull her out of her current math class of number recognition, because she could add and subtract already. She scored 99% on the kindergarten test, and she scored 2 points below the required grade for the first grade test. They had her fill in a scantron sheet, which terrified her, and don't think the test really showed her ability. If I had to do it over, I would have had the county give her the current grade level test, and if she scored high enough, would have paid for the private next year level test. It was silly for her not to receive first grade instruction just because she hadn't mastered ALL first grade taught.....isn't that the point, to challange them?
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Old 01-14-2010, 07:00 PM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
11,800 posts, read 27,471,977 times
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My 4th child is a girl. She is 16 years old and since her birthday is 9/18, she is one of the youngest in her class and of her friends.

I can tell you that she is very immature (partly being younger than the others and partly because she is the baby of the family). She makes all A's so the work is not difficult for her BUT it is difficult for her since most of her close friends now have their license and jobs.

Peer Pressure is tough for her. And being younger, she sometimes doesn't make the best decisions.

Looking ahead, she will be going to college in 1.5 years. I hope she matures much more in that year and a half.

We discussed with her pre school teachers (years ago) about holding her back a year and they didn't agree with it. Now (hindsight is 20/20) I wish we had kept her back.

Vicki
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Old 01-14-2010, 07:00 PM
 
3,780 posts, read 7,177,342 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lyssny View Post
I think we all know that children are sponges and if given the chance they will flourish. Can someone please explain than the reason for the cutoff date?
I agree with you that young children learn very quickly. I taught multiplication, division, decimals, fractions, square roots, and algebraic equations to second graders, and they learned more easily than many of the seventh and eighth graders I later taught.

But learning and being in school are not the same thing. Let your child flourish outside of school. Give him all sorts of learning opportunities (not workbooks, unless he craves them). Let him help you bake cookies. Take him to the library. Read with him. Count by 10's, by 5's, 2's, and even 3's. Let him count your change. Have him figure out whether there are more oak trees or maple trees (in a certain place), and how many more. Let him write or dictate stories. Sing songs. Look at maps. Talk about what causes the weather. Let him run and climb and jump and kick a ball. But don't make him spend his day in a chair (or sitting quietly on a rug) until you absolutely have to.

If you need to have him in school, maybe you could try the Montessori school, as someone else suggested.

A separate issue: if there were no cutoff date, many parents whose children were not mature enough for school would enroll them because school is free, and preschool is not. Some would make the decision based on the child's needs; others would do what their finances seemed to require.
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Old 01-14-2010, 07:01 PM
 
932 posts, read 2,733,837 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lyssny View Post
It doesn't have anything to do with "just moving here" I don't think I should get special treatment, it has to do with my son has already done 2 years in a school classroom. I don't understand why there is a cut off date at all it should be the year the child is born up to dec.31st. And the parent should be able to decide to hold their child back if they think its needed. Really who knows their child better than their parents. It makes no sense. Can someone show me any proof or any studies done that say a child born between sept.1 and dec.31st are not able to learn as quickly or not as ready. I think we all know that children are sponges and if given the chance they will flourish. Can someone please explain than the reason for the cutoff date?
Parents should know their children better than anyone else. But sometimes they see their kids through rose colored glasses and believe their children are more advanced than they are. I have a friend that's dealing with real problems with her kindergartener because she couldn't or wouldn't see it sooner.

I agree about considering home school. I would love to home school if it were best for my son, but he needs a more structured setting and needs to be in a classroom to thrive. I do continue to teach him at home and hope that it will payoff when he's in a grade where he's more challenged, plus he loves to learn. You'll be surprised at the different skill levels you see in kindergarten some kids didn't recognize all of their letters and some were reading on the first day.
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Old 01-14-2010, 07:02 PM
 
Location: Cary, NC
8,264 posts, read 21,829,467 times
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Wake County will not do testing for early KG entry because you are not a Wake County student at that point. It's a totally different procedure for students already enrolled versus non students. If if you miss the cut off, you are a non-student and must pay for private testing if you want to try for early admission. Testing for grade level placement once in the system is totally different.

Edited to add the actual documents and guidelines for early entry: http://www.wcpss.net/forms/early-kindergarten-application-process.pdf (broken link)
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Old 01-14-2010, 07:04 PM
 
3,780 posts, read 7,177,342 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lyssny View Post
And not that he dosn't do well but socially doesn't interact to thier standards. He is on th shy side and needs some time to warm up to new people.
This also will be helped with maturity. School is all about behaving according to certain standards.
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Old 01-15-2010, 07:35 PM
 
932 posts, read 2,733,837 times
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My son brought home a letter from school regarding registration for next year. It had a bit of info regarding early admission for kindergarten. I was able to find the specifics for those interested.

http://www.wcpss.net/forms/early-kindergarten-application-process.pdf (broken link)
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Old 01-15-2010, 10:58 PM
 
1,106 posts, read 2,953,305 times
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First, there has to be a deadline and it needs to be stuck to.

You can go with a private school but remeber that private schools do not have the same curriculum as the public schools. This could be one reason that the prior two years of private school doesn't mean anything to the district. They care more about the age for maturity reasons I would assume.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lyssny View Post
Plus we just moved here and he has already done a 3yr old program in a private school and is in a 4yr old program in a school down here. Not daycare, school.
Private schools make money with the younger ages by calling it "school" and not daycare. It is a way to charge more.

If I can hold on to my daughter for one more year I will. I want her to go to college as mature as possible. When she is with me I can control some things but in college, all of that is up to her and I want her prepared to make the smart decisions.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lyssny View Post
Really who knows their child better than their parents. It makes no sense.
I deal with over a hundred of kids directly everyday (well really just Mon-Fri) and I can tell you that parents really don't know their kids. Every year I have parents who think their child is a saint and will believe whatever the child says. If only you could see how some of these kids act when their parents are not around.

Think about it, how much stupid or crazy stuff did you do that your parents don't know about?

Quote:
Originally Posted by lyssny View Post
Can someone show me any proof or any studies done that say a child born between sept.1 and dec.31st are not able to learn as quickly or not as ready. ......... Can someone please explain than the reason for the cutoff date?
I think we have established that it more than likely for two reasons none of which are learning ability. Reasons being class size and maturity.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lyssny View Post
I think we all know that children are sponges and if given the chance they will flourish.
There are kids who have all the advantages in the world and do not flourish. I see and deal with them everyday.

I would keep my daughter the extra year. Whatever you choose I wish you the best of luck.

Take this as it may: I have been teaching for a while now and we always get transfers of kids that where homeschooled. They leave for multiple reasons, some want to go to high school with other kids and the parents put them in the 8th grade, some parents recognize that they just can't keep up with their childs education and put them in school, some parents just get tired, and so on and so on. I have one kid that the mom didn't believe her son would do well in public school so she homeschooled him. I will say that he is smart, but is a PITA. The mom gave up, drove him to his fathers house and took a flight across the country b/c he was too much of a discipline problem. What I am trying to say, is dealing with over 20 kids transferred to the school only one of them has been okay, and she didn't learn too much with her mom but she is well behaved and works hard to catch up.

Just know that your decision now will have affects long down the road. Every parent I know wants their child to be the smartest and brightest and believe that they did a great job raising their kids and have things like oh Johnny is already in school b/c he is advanced. I have caught myself struggling with this sometime with my daughter and realize that I don't care do rush her to potty training and walking. It will all happen in time.
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