U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > North Carolina > Raleigh, Durham, Chapel Hill, Cary
 [Register]
Raleigh, Durham, Chapel Hill, Cary The Triangle Area
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 03-12-2010, 10:46 AM
 
5,265 posts, read 14,562,066 times
Reputation: 4225

Advertisements

I've come up with a theory on this that I think i've mentioned in another thread in greater detail; but here's a somewhat abbreviated version. Transplants to the triangle (or any high-growth area for that matter) WANT to believe that there aren't many natives. Subconsciously or admitingly, they'd prefer to believe that most of the people in the area are transplants like themselves so that they do not feel like an "outsider". If everyone else in the area is also a transplant; they don't have to worry about "fitting in" or changing to the way things have "always been done around here". It's understandable to not want to feel like the new guy (or gal) in town to feel like you are just as much a part of the identity of the area as anyone else; but it CAN be sort of a slap in the face to the hundreds of thousands of people whos families have lived in Wake County for generations to say "oh well this area is all transplants so I'm not really like a new person living here and just as much of a Raleighnite as anyone else".
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-12-2010, 07:50 PM
 
6,185 posts, read 13,842,121 times
Reputation: 4456
Um, no.

My husband was born at the old Rex hospital. He grew up inside the Beltline, and that's where all his relatives lived. So I know those natives.

But I've been here 17 years, and I've worked as a contract worker in a variety of companies. I can honestly say that I've met few natives.

I even tried to publish a "Southern" cookbook from recipes from Brentwood residents, many of whom have been here almost half a century, but I was told many of them aren't Southern. They arrived here years ago from elsewhere. So I didn't do the cookbook.

If you live in North Raleigh, you do hear and meet mostly non-natives.

I remember, years ago in a fabric store, overhearing two women talk, in lilting Southern accents, about their gardens and what they planted; they planted all Southern vegetables. It was memorable to me, because I rarely heard anything so "Southern."

If you work in RTP, in many companies, you do hear and meet mostly non-natives. I'm thinking of all the people I worked with in RTP, and I can recall only one NC native, and she was originally from Asheville. When I worked in Zebulon, almost all the workers were native.

I had a brief assignment with the State government, and I know there are a lot of natives who work there, but my (large) immediate work group had members temporarily commuting from all over the country. I was the closest to being a "native" because I lived five minutes away.

Years ago, I knew a graphic artist here who had "native" in her company name. She knew she was rare.

My husband has met many people over the years who have said he's the only native Raleighite they know.

There's nothing psychological about newcomers sometimes not running into too many natives. It's just fact.

And non-natives ARE part of what makes the Triangle the Triangle, like it or not.

It's not a slap in the face to anyone.

I do agree, though, that it's frustrating to see people move here to escape what they left, and in doing so, they create what they were trying to escape.

Quote:
Originally Posted by I'minformed2 View Post
I've come up with a theory on this that I think i've mentioned in another thread in greater detail; but here's a somewhat abbreviated version. Transplants to the triangle (or any high-growth area for that matter) WANT to believe that there aren't many natives. Subconsciously or admitingly, they'd prefer to believe that most of the people in the area are transplants like themselves so that they do not feel like an "outsider". If everyone else in the area is also a transplant; they don't have to worry about "fitting in" or changing to the way things have "always been done around here". It's understandable to not want to feel like the new guy (or gal) in town to feel like you are just as much a part of the identity of the area as anyone else; but it CAN be sort of a slap in the face to the hundreds of thousands of people whos families have lived in Wake County for generations to say "oh well this area is all transplants so I'm not really like a new person living here and just as much of a Raleighnite as anyone else".

Last edited by lovebrentwood; 03-12-2010 at 08:20 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-12-2010, 08:04 PM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
10,323 posts, read 18,656,394 times
Reputation: 11064
Quote:
Originally Posted by I'minformed2 View Post
I've come up with a theory on this that I think I've mentioned in another thread in greater detail; but here's a somewhat abbreviated version. Transplants to the triangle (or any high-growth area for that matter) WANT to believe that there aren't many natives. Subconsciously or admittedly, they'd prefer to believe that most of the people in the area are transplants like themselves so that they do not feel like an "outsider". If everyone else in the area is also a transplant; they don't have to worry about "fitting in" or changing to the way things have "always been done around here". It's understandable to not want to feel like the new guy (or gal) in town to feel like you are just as much a part of the identity of the area as anyone else; but it CAN be sort of a slap in the face to the hundreds of thousands of people whose families have lived in Wake County for generations to say "oh well this area is all transplants so I'm not really like a new person living here and just as much of a Raleighite as anyone else".
That's a very astute observation, in many/most cases!

But there are different "degrees" of native/transplants, a big difference between those who've just moved here in the 2000s vs those who arrived in the 90s, 80s, etc. There is assimilation over time (not to mention folks who remember "how things were XX years ago--with XX varying, of course), though with the out-of-control growth rate in the most recent years, this may be in danger of disappearing.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-13-2010, 06:51 AM
 
Location: Morrisville, NC
7,690 posts, read 10,062,057 times
Reputation: 6909
Quote:
Originally Posted by MAtoNC! View Post
Another old Rex! I miss that other member even if he didn't care for carpetbaggers I learned a lot about ITB

And you are in Morrisville now? Wow, I bet there are even less natives there than Cary! How do you like Morrisville as a native of the Triangle?

Morrisville is great. Very centrally located, if you consider the area to be the Triangle area and not just City of Raleigh. Getting to Raleigh for entertainment is quick as is getting to and from Durham. We go to bulls games, Southpoint Mall, Crabtree mall, wherever.

Over the last 10 years I have had jobs on Oberlin Rd, right here in Morrisville and American Tobacco. No problem going to any of them. But you are going to meet hardly any area natives, that is for sure.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-13-2010, 03:22 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
1,709 posts, read 1,983,890 times
Reputation: 1869
North Carolina ranks 2nd in the country when it comes to those who remain throughout their lifetimes in the same state that they were born in.
#1 - Texas
#2 - North Carolina
#3 - Georgia

I would think California ranked high up there as well...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-13-2010, 07:23 PM
 
5,265 posts, read 14,562,066 times
Reputation: 4225
Actually, California has the highest negative net-migration of any state in the US and has since the 90's. Where do you think most of the people moving to Arizona and Nevada were from?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-13-2010, 07:54 PM
 
122 posts, read 383,224 times
Reputation: 42
Wow. I really didn't think that question would strike such a nerve with some of you. It was just a question. My neighbors are from New York, Michigan, Virginia, Louisiana. It just made me wonder about it. Some of you need to settle down and quit getting so defensive.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-13-2010, 08:49 PM
 
Location: 27609
525 posts, read 1,113,093 times
Reputation: 541
I was born in Durham...now live in Raleigh and never plan on living anywhere else.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-13-2010, 09:36 PM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
10,323 posts, read 18,656,394 times
Reputation: 11064
Quote:
Originally Posted by jnr4411 View Post
Wow. I really didn't think that question would strike such a nerve with some of you. It was just a question. My neighbors are from New York, Michigan, Virginia, Louisiana. It just made me wonder about it. Some of you need to settle down and quit getting so defensive.
There's nothing "Defensive" about pointing out fallacies in arguments. You asked:
Quote:

Why is there no one in Raleigh from Raleigh?
when in fact, there are THOUSANDS of folks in Raleigh who grew up here, and several people mentioned this. That's not "defensive", it's saying "why do you make such an assumption when it is clearly inaccurate?"
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-14-2010, 12:36 PM
 
Location: Cary, NC
2,135 posts, read 6,832,871 times
Reputation: 1588
Very interesting! I'll have to look up what it is for MA...

Quote:
Originally Posted by architect77 View Post
North Carolina ranks 2nd in the country when it comes to those who remain throughout their lifetimes in the same state that they were born in.
#1 - Texas
#2 - North Carolina
#3 - Georgia

I would think California ranked high up there as well...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:



Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > North Carolina > Raleigh, Durham, Chapel Hill, Cary
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top