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Old 03-11-2010, 01:10 PM
 
Location: Western NY
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Since my family has been considering a move to the area from Rochester, NY, I've been posting questions and reading threads about our obvious concerns . . .but what about one of my favorite hobbies . . .gardening?! Is it basically the same as here, but you get to start sooner?
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Old 03-11-2010, 01:34 PM
 
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Originally Posted by tjm1013 View Post
Since my family has been considering a move to the area from Rochester, NY, I've been posting questions and reading threads about our obvious concerns . . .but what about one of my favorite hobbies . . .gardening?! Is it basically the same as here, but you get to start sooner?

Right. You can plant cool weather crops like lettuce, spinach ect... in February and March and spring crops like tomato, peppers ect in April after tax day (April 15).

The only other difference is the soil. Typically it is a lot of red clay. Be prepared to either build raised beds or amend the soil with a lot of compost and organic matter.
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Old 03-11-2010, 01:35 PM
 
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In my humble former Rochesterian opinion, gardening is not as easy. The soil needs more attention; we just buy new soil instead of using what's there like we did in Rochester.

There are more bugs that want to eat plants.

It gets superhot in the summer, so some things don't survive as easily.

Tomatoes need watering every day.

But gardening is huge here, and lots of people love it. You can also grow some tropical plants in your yard as part of your landscaping. (I learned on this forum that some people think "they don't look right." I disagree.)
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Old 03-11-2010, 01:41 PM
 
Location: Raleigh
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Default Gardening

Quote:
Originally Posted by tjm1013 View Post
Since my family has been considering a move to the area from Rochester, NY, I've been posting questions and reading threads about our obvious concerns . . .but what about one of my favorite hobbies . . .gardening?! Is it basically the same as here, but you get to start sooner?
Hey tjm...I am a Rochester transplant, living in the Triangle area for the past 3 years. I would have to say the biggest difference/challenge is the soil. In this area, it is mostly clay and requires quite a bit of amending if you're hoping to do more than basic landscaping.

The growing season is extended about a month or six weeks on each end. We are just now seeing tulip and daffodil leave poking up through the ground, although there are some random clusters of daffs blooming already.

You'll be able to grow here most of what you can in Rochester...with the exception of Lilacs (that makes me sad!) and the conifers. It's just too hot here in the summer for them...and generally not cold enough in the winter. On the flip side, there are some wonderful southern classics that would never survive a Rochester winter. Two of my favorites being the Southern Magnolia and the Camillias.

My office is a 5 minute walk from a beautiful public garden and the magnolia trees there must be close to 100 years old...they are huge and gorgeous!!

I grew up walking distance from Highland Park, and have always had a love of green space, trees, flowers etc. We have a fair amount of hardwood trees here, mainly oaks but pine is the predominant tree in the area. That took some getting used to but I'm starting to adjust :-)

Gardening is a long held tradition in this area and each of the three cities in the triangle has a public garden or arboretum and offer tours, classes, workshops etc. I think you'll find once you adapt to the climate you'll really enjoy gardening.
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Old 03-11-2010, 01:53 PM
 
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What about deer? This will be my first summer in the area and I'm getting nervous that the already abundant deer are going to have a field day with my flowers. Any suggestions on keeping them at bay?
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Old 03-11-2010, 03:19 PM
 
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Originally Posted by milliehubbard View Post
You'll be able to grow here most of what you can in Rochester...with the exception of Lilacs (that makes me sad!) and the conifers. It's just too hot here in the summer for them...and generally not cold enough in the winter.
Not sure I agree with that - I had two very nice lilac bushes I'd planted in my yard in Raleigh when I lived there that did very well. There are also varieties of Althea that are very similar to lilac that do well.
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Old 03-11-2010, 04:07 PM
 
Location: Efland
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Here's a thread about the deer. I need your help! Deer eating my garden!

Hopefully I can figure something out to save the lilies this year! We're also doing a garden and will probably have to put some kind of fencing up.
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Old 03-11-2010, 04:14 PM
 
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At GlaxoSmithKline in Zebulon, there was a walkway that had many small lilacs. I think they were from Japan. It was wonderful to see them.

In this area, I've never seen huge lilacs like the ones in Rochester.

Quote:
Originally Posted by CHTransplant View Post
Not sure I agree with that - I had two very nice lilac bushes I'd planted in my yard in Raleigh when I lived there that did very well. There are also varieties of Althea that are very similar to lilac that do well.
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Old 03-11-2010, 04:22 PM
 
Location: H. F.
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Moderator cut: Off-topic/inappropriate comment

plan on raised bed gardens. It makes for much easier work than trying to amend the clay soil.

Last edited by Green Irish Eyes; 03-11-2010 at 04:46 PM..
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Old 03-11-2010, 04:49 PM
 
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If you like to grow tomatoes, we start much earlier here that in the north. However, once it reaches a certain point in the summer, it gets too hot and humid for some veggies and tomatoes to pollinate, so proper timing of planting is important to make sure this happens before it gets too hot.

Since it's humid here, there are battles with powdery mildew, etc. and we also have a significant number of insects and critters that love our veggies (I'm thinking how the squash vine borers destroyed all my squash last year!). The humidity really affects roses as well; I have not been lucky with hybrid teas.

And yes, the clay can be backbreaking. Frequent watering, especially for tomatoes, is essential.

But as someone else mentioned, we have a longer growing season via the earlier start and later end. You can pick your last tomatoes in October if you plan properly.

And if your crop's a bust, you just drive on over to the Farmer's Market for a vast selection of veggies.

P.S. I failed here with lilacs.

Here's the NCSU veggie planting guide, and they also have many brochures available online about all types of gardening. Vegetable Garden Planting Guide
Vegetable Garden Planting Guide
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