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Old 09-26-2012, 05:44 AM
 
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After inspection, buyer is asking for what we all consider to be excessive allowances/repairs, etc. Typically, all the back/forth would be done through the lawyers, but would you let the buyer/seller sit down together so they can each make their case to eachother and try to come to an agreement?
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Old 09-26-2012, 06:04 AM
 
Location: Gilbert - Val Vista Lakes
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If the buyer is being excessive, then I think it would not be a good idea. Emotions could take over and the deal fall apart right there.

The buyers agent needs to explain to the buyer what is excessive and what is reasonable. Much of the negotiation strategy would depend on the current market and the buyers and sellers motivation to have a successful transaction.

The agents are being paid to negotiate; let them do their job.
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Old 09-26-2012, 06:22 AM
 
Location: Blue Ridge Mntns., NC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lenniel View Post
After inspection, buyer is asking for what we all consider to be excessive allowances/repairs, etc. Typically, all the back/forth would be done through the lawyers, but would you let the buyer/seller sit down together so they can each make their case to eachother and try to come to an agreement?

Who is "we all" consider"? Are you the buyer's agent? or seller's agent? Or the seller.

Capt. Bill is 100% correct. And another word to the wise, keep the lawyers out of it until you come to a resolution. Mark my words, they create problems so they can get paid to solve them.

Keep it simple.
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Old 09-26-2012, 06:31 AM
 
Location: Louisville KY Metro area
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I am a principal broker. I know most of the arguments for and against buyers and sellers meeting. There is risk either way. My opinion: on a case by case basis, darn toot'n I'm putting buyers with sellers, especially if the sellers have occupied the home for extended times. So, what if the seller says there is a problem in the woods. Good thing that it came out before the buyer claims the agent failed to disclose.

Folks, we are helping sellers and buyers sell and buy homes, not just roofs over heads. Let's get humanity back into this business. Once again, let's find people homes which are fortresses from life's storms and happy places to raise families.

Yes, doing it that way is harder, but much more than a commission check. It's a lifestyle business and what we do affects lifestyles of so many.
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Old 09-26-2012, 08:11 AM
 
Location: Blue Ridge Mntns., NC
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Agree also with Tomocox to a point. Louisville KY may be a more laid back area. There are other metro areas where people are desperate to sell and the fangs come out.

In this economy and market conditions, you don't always know what the stress levels are of either or both parties. If something "comes out" that the agent didn't know about, yes, absolutely best to discuss it up front.

And what one person considers "excessive", may not be excessive to the other party. The idea is to bring everyone to a common sense approach in negotiating repair requests. Lawyers only need to write up the final decision; and actually they don't like to be involved in trivialities. However! no agent should discourage either party from using the lawyers. Many people are itching for litigation these days. Why not have a 4-way discussion. Buyers, sellers, and both agents, keep a cool head, and the voice level calm.
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Old 09-26-2012, 09:47 AM
 
Location: Salem, OR
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Honestly, it depends on the personality of the buyer and the seller. Also, it isn't up to me as an agent to "allow" my buyers to get together with the sellers. It is up to the buyer. So if you want to meet with them directly, pass it along and see if the buyers want to meet with you. My guess is they would say no. Most buyers have no interest in dealing with the seller directly in negotiations, especially over repairs.
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Old 09-26-2012, 10:54 AM
 
Location: Columbia, SC
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Depends.
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Old 09-26-2012, 11:19 AM
 
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I would avoid it and advise against it. On top of that if the seller is home while my buyer is looking at a house I advise them to say a polite hello and not discuss the house so much. If you lay all of your cards on the table you many end up paying more for that house than you would have otherwise. What is even more dumb is having an agent that does this for you. I have had countless agents call me and say about a listing, "They love it. That is the house they have to have and can't see themselves living anywhere else!!" Sometimes buyers and sellers may as well be talking to each other.
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Old 09-26-2012, 11:27 AM
 
Location: NJ
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From my non-professional view it seems the risks of doing that far outweigh the benefits.
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Old 10-24-2012, 10:21 PM
 
413 posts, read 697,575 times
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I can say that in my personal experience the result was the exact opposite of all the responses in this thread.

With all the layers of communication between 2 parties, 2 lawyers, and 2 agents all the messages were completely mixed up. Seller thought I was being completely unreasonable. I thought seller was being ridiculous.

Then when seller and I started communicating directly things went far smoother. We were able to hammer out our differences pretty easily and come to a reasonable compromise. In a deal where both lawyers originally didn't think we would ever resolve inspection issues we ended things amicably and the sellers even sent us a bottle of champagne congratulating us on our new house.

As a buyer I am personally of the belief that dealing in person is quite frankly a lot easier, more direct and yields better results. Most people are pretty reasonable people and hiding behind a curtain often makes them look much worse than they really are.
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