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Old 12-21-2014, 06:38 PM
 
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I am a junior in college with a lot of interest in making a career out of being a realtor. I understand the process of becoming one i.e, taking the exam, getting in touch with realtors, etc. My question is, is there any way I can get a head start now while I am in college? Are real estate internships a thing? How can I go about it? Should I take my exam soon and get a jump start on that? Any suggestions would be appreciated
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Old 12-21-2014, 06:50 PM
 
Location: Cary, NC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dyeam View Post
I am a junior in college with a lot of interest in making a career out of being a realtor. I understand the process of becoming one i.e, taking the exam, getting in touch with realtors, etc. My question is, is there any way I can get a head start now while I am in college? Are real estate internships a thing? How can I go about it? Should I take my exam soon and get a jump start on that? Any suggestions would be appreciated

1. Learn how money works. Mortgages, Loans, personal finance and budgeting, credit scores, etc. Learn about the real costs of having a small, independent business. Learn about capital investment vs. expenses, and efficient use of capital. That alone will put you many leagues ahead of most agents.

2. Common advice is to read "The Millionaire Real Estate Agent" by Gary Keller. I think it is a bit advanced in some respects for a starter, but it gives you a road map on building a business.

3. Hammer out your degree before you worry about taking a tangential course like real estate licensing.
Get a good educational background, to be well-rounded.
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Old 12-21-2014, 08:39 PM
 
Location: los angeles county
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Don't feel the need to overstudy for this.

It's a hands-on job, so you'll learn as you go.

For a real head start, work on your attitude, confidence, ability to take rejection, aggressiveness, communication skills, etc.

Yes, you can get your license NOW, get that out of the way, if time permits.
The plus side of this is... when people look up your license, you won't APPEAR to be a rookie when you graduate and enter the field full time.

Internships? you make it sound like this is a medical, law, or business field.
don't worry about that.
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Old 12-21-2014, 09:36 PM
 
8,029 posts, read 10,495,002 times
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Originally Posted by MikeJaquish View Post
3. Hammer out your degree before you worry about taking a tangential course like real estate licensing.
Get a good educational background, to be well-rounded.
^^^^^This, above all else. Being a real estate agent is a tough business to start and to be successful at it. The income can be quite sporadic, especially in the beginning. Don't put all of your eggs into one basket.

Still, you could consider a variety of fields of study such as business, economics, finance, political science (particularly dealing with state and municipal govt; zoning; taxation), environmental studies, urban planning, etc. Really, a number of fields are very relevant to real estate and business practices. There might even be a specific class on real estate principles which will give you a head start on the licensing exam. Even if you pass with flying colors, though, don't assume that you know much about real estate. Being a good agent--and knowing a lot about real estate--requires years of experience...and there's always something new to learn.
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Old 12-21-2014, 10:47 PM
 
Location: El Dorado Hills, CA
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Think about where you plan to live and learn everything about that area. If you meet people there, start your database and think of a good non real estate related way to stay in contact with them.
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Old 12-22-2014, 07:14 PM
 
Location: Mokelumne Hill, CA & El Pescadero, BCS MX.
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I disagree. I have a son who is in his last undergrad year and certainly he has a plateful, but he doesn't have to return to college from now until the 20th of January. More than enough time to study for a R/E license.

Given how relatively easy it is to get a license, I'd say go for it and when you get it, hang it somewhere where you can "intern" in your spare time.

Good luck!
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Old 12-22-2014, 08:04 PM
 
Location: Georgia
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If you're a junior in college, that means that you have next summer, presumably, before your senior year, to get your feet wet in real estate.

I'm with DMenscha -- it's not a particularly tough exam, especially for someone who is already in "study" mode. You can take the class on-line, to finish within a certain period of time (here, it's six months). Then I'd recommend taking a test crash course, usually a weekend where you take a practice exam and see if there are any holes in your learning. After that, take your exam, and I suspect you'll probably do pretty well.

If you have your license before the summer, then you might spend your summer being a real estate assistant -- one with a license, who can act as a showing assistant, help busy agents with listings, etc. Summers are busy times for most agents, and a productive team might be grateful to have someone like you who can show buyers homes as well as help with some of the detail work in getting listings up and running. And, really, if you manage your time right, it's the kind of job you can do on weekends for a team when you go back to school for your senior year, or between class hours, if you have a light class load your senior year. If you're computer savvy, that's also a plus, because you can help on lead follow-up, social media marketing, listing distribution, etc.
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Old 12-23-2014, 04:29 AM
 
108 posts, read 133,739 times
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First of all you need to complete your studies, after that try to get more knowledge about mortage, credit score, personal finance etc. As you have a strong interest in that field then you can start a small business.
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Old 12-23-2014, 11:00 AM
 
8,029 posts, read 10,495,002 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DMenscha View Post
I disagree. I have a son who is in his last undergrad year and certainly he has a plateful, but he doesn't have to return to college from now until the 20th of January. More than enough time to study for a R/E license.

Given how relatively easy it is to get a license, I'd say go for it and when you get it, hang it somewhere where you can "intern" in your spare time.

Good luck!
I can certainly appreciate that viewpoint. My primary precaution is that the OP should focus on completing college and getting a degree. He should not delay--or worse, abandon--finishing college. Unless he intends to work in real estate while finishing college (not sure if he's a full-time student), there is no urgency in getting a license. (From reading the OP's other thread, I see that he is a somewhat older student, so that can impact considerations.)

Another option for the OP might be to see if he can get college credit for taking a pre-licensure real estate class and passing the state exam. That might be an option if Directed Study courses can be arranged with a professor. That's exactly what I did in grad school when I took a course in preparation of passing my broker's exam.

By the way, I can only assume that your son has had a head start to begin with. It can't hurt to have an excellent real estate mentor in-house.
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Old 12-24-2014, 01:31 AM
 
12 posts, read 14,555 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dblackga View Post
If you're a junior in college, that means that you have next summer, presumably, before your senior year, to get your feet wet in real estate.

I'm with DMenscha -- it's not a particularly tough exam, especially for someone who is already in "study" mode. You can take the class on-line, to finish within a certain period of time (here, it's six months). Then I'd recommend taking a test crash course, usually a weekend where you take a practice exam and see if there are any holes in your learning. After that, take your exam, and I suspect you'll probably do pretty well.

If you have your license before the summer, then you might spend your summer being a real estate assistant -- one with a license, who can act as a showing assistant, help busy agents with listings, etc. Summers are busy times for most agents, and a productive team might be grateful to have someone like you who can show buyers homes as well as help with some of the detail work in getting listings up and running. And, really, if you manage your time right, it's the kind of job you can do on weekends for a team when you go back to school for your senior year, or between class hours, if you have a light class load your senior year. If you're computer savvy, that's also a plus, because you can help on lead follow-up, social media marketing, listing distribution, etc.
This is great advice and something I have not thought of. Is a RE assistant a common thing? How could I go about being one in the summer? Just contact agencies and see if they need help? Or do they put those kinds of jobs up online?
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