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Old 05-23-2010, 07:06 AM
 
3 posts, read 4,437 times
Reputation: 15
Default Requirements have changed

Quote:
Originally Posted by Stlhomeinspector View Post
Great post RR,

If one wants to see what what type of requirements one must meet before joining InterNACHI please visit...

Become a certified inspector! Join InterNACHI today. - InterNACHI


Bill

When NACHI first started, I took their online exam and damn near pissed myself laughing. After passing the National Home Inspector's Exam in a proctored testing facility (which is a two and a half hr test), I found this NACHI online exam to be comical.

For starters, the correct answer on the multiple choice already had a default bullet point. What kind of test already gives you the answer up front by filling in the bullet point next to the correct answer? Was this to steer me into a perfect score I wondered? Even if the bullet point was not already filled in, the other answer choices were so ludicrous, the person taking the test had no choice but to choose the default answer.

I am not kidding when I give you this example of a question that was on the original test: ex, "A yellow flame on a gas furnace indicates, A. (bullet pointed already) Lack of primary oxygen B. Jimmy Hendricks has seen the seventh sign of the seventh sun. C. Clairol has a new hair color D. All of the above

Please believe me. This was an actual question. I will never forget it as long as I live (thanks for the memories, Nick )I have no reason to lie as I wanted to join this organization as I was already a member of ASHI and NAHI. I wanted more exposure for my home inspection business.

The test was written by a third grader. You will love this next question I had to answer: The correct spelling of an electrical outlet is: A. receptical B. reseptacle C. receptacle D. recepticle

I thought, why in the world would this even be on the test unless they are testing your capacity to spell? I damn near died when two questions later, there was a typo in the question!! Who did not proofread this test before they published it.

After breezing through this silly test in about twenty minutes, I had to take the Ethics portion. No big deal. Ten minutes later, the website said congratulations! You are now a Master Certified Home Inspector and asked me for $289. Then the lightbulb went on. This owner of NACHI was brilliant! Put an online test in place that only a fool could fail (and according to NACHI, 60% fail this test), and you will pull in millions overnight. (wish I'd thought of it first)

By this time i could have paid the $289 and seek the additrional support I was looking for as NACHI DID indeed offer some great marketing that the others fell short of.

I was just too angry at the time to part with any more money. How would YOU feel if you have worked hard as a new inspector to become a member of the Florida Association of Building Inspectors, worked to earn full membership after 50 fee paid inspections because ASHI wouldn't even look at you with your lack of experience? (don't get me wrong, I was very experienced in all trades, but inspections were another ballgame) Remember, NACHI was not around yet during this time.

I worked my way up doing two inspections per day during the real easte boom from year 2000 onward under the FABI standards (which were actually more detailed than ASHI's)

I took the National Exam which was one hell of a grueling test. Failed it. How could this happen when I knew all the material? Apparently not! This was no open book test. I got a pencil and scrap paper to makes notes on, a computer screen and some proctor looking over our shoulder.

I passed it the second time and the third and fourth. I take it every yr to try and beat my previous score just for fun.

I later became a full member of ASHI. Damn good thing too as all the realtors would only refer you if you could prove you were a member.

Around this time, NACHI started to become popular. On one inspection, I ran into the cleaning lady I knew from a large building company. She said she saw my truck out front and thought she'd stop in and say hello. She informed me that she now had her Master Certified Home Inspector designation. NOW, I was really pissed! I had performed close to 340 inspections by this time and SHE, a person with little knowledge of ANY trade was an inspector. She must have been because three months later, she was in the phone book with a large display ad. Gee, do you want to guess which logo she displayed????

NACHI has changed somewhat. Now that revenue was raised and over 6,000 made it throught the gate under that original test, the test was changed a few times. I haven't seen the latest one, but I hope it is absent the stupid questions and typos.

I can't blame new inspectors for running to NACHI. They have amazing marketing support and super ongoing education. The longer established organizations fell short in that arena. Nobody wants to wait as long as I did to be recognized as a home inspector, but I feel it forced me to accelerate my learning curve and the coffee they served at those corporate hotels during the FABI seminars couldn't be beat. We were all wired.
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Old 05-23-2010, 12:10 PM
Status: "Keep some sunshine on your face!" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Mountain Ranch, CA The heart of Calaveras County
6,000 posts, read 10,820,413 times
Reputation: 4664
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stlhomeinspector View Post
Great post RR,

If one wants to see what what type of requirements one must meet before joining InterNACHI please visit...

Become a certified inspector! Join InterNACHI today. - InterNACHI


Bill
In 47 minutes, I passed all three of the tests required for membership in InterNachi. 88% on the main quiz, 100% on the ethics and 89% on the standards of practice. To be fair, I did work in the construction trades as a younger man. And yes Stuie123, the same silly questions were on my test, but the bullet points weren't highlighted.

I guess I can be a home inspector now.
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Old 05-23-2010, 12:28 PM
 
4 posts, read 7,929 times
Reputation: 10
ASHI is a known diploma mill. Anyone can join ASHI online, in less than 30 seconds, by simply providing a valid credit number.

ASHI's highest "certified" membership level isn't much better and is based on passing one beginner's exam (NHIE), the very same beginner's exam used by many states to license newbies fresh out of home inspection school.

Any REALTOR caught recommending an ASHI member should be sued for negligent referral and then hung from a bridge for all to see.
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Old 05-23-2010, 01:28 PM
 
Location: Columbia, SC
6,945 posts, read 10,504,650 times
Reputation: 3496
Quote:
Originally Posted by ASHI is a diploma mill. View Post
Any REALTOR caught recommending an ASHI member should be sued for negligent referral and then hung from a bridge for all to see.
So you're saying any HI that is an ASHI member they are a poor home inspector? I didn't realizing being an ASHI member and a good HI where mutually exclusive.
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Old 05-23-2010, 03:35 PM
 
Location: Barrington
18,094 posts, read 13,023,458 times
Reputation: 5860
In Illinois, licensing requires a 60 hour course which may be a home study course and passing an exam. There is a 12 hour biannual continuing education requirement.

People flocked to this profession because of the easy entry requirements and created more supply than demand for services which meant that the cost of a home inspection declined over the past 5 years.

I have never given any consideration to trade asscoiation affiliation, when referring a home inspector. My own criteria is that he/ she must have at least 10,000 home inspections under their belt.
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Old 05-23-2010, 04:37 PM
 
4 posts, read 7,929 times
Reputation: 10
Quote:
So you're saying any HI that is an ASHI member they are a poor home inspector?
Yes.

Why else would an inspector choose the one "society" (ASHI) that has no, or nearly no requirements over any of the more professional trade associations? There can only be one answer. The inspector is so lousy that he can only qualify for diploma mill ASHI membership.

Last edited by ASHI is a diploma mill.; 05-23-2010 at 05:01 PM..
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Old 05-23-2010, 05:14 PM
 
Location: Columbia, SC
6,945 posts, read 10,504,650 times
Reputation: 3496
Quote:
Originally Posted by ASHI is a diploma mill. View Post
Yes.

Why else would an inspector choose the one "society" (ASHI) that has no, or nearly no requirements over any of the more professional trade associations? There can only be one answer. The inspector is so lousy that he can only qualify for diploma mill ASHI membership.
So a home inspector cannot be a member of both?
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Old 05-24-2010, 08:00 AM
 
4 posts, read 7,929 times
Reputation: 10
I don't know.

I didn't join INACHI because of their requirements. I joined because 99% of everything my inspection business needs to succeed is provided by INACHI for free.

ASHI offered me nothing.
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Old 05-24-2010, 08:16 AM
 
Location: Dallas/Ft. Worth, TX
1,155 posts, read 2,573,630 times
Reputation: 1851
Quote:
Originally Posted by middle-aged mom View Post
I have never given any consideration to trade asscoiation affiliation, when referring a home inspector. My own criteria is that he/ she must have at least 10,000 home inspections under their belt.
A properly performed, full inspection, and a properly written report, takes time and is generally a one inspection per day process. So based on your criteria of having 10,000 home inspections under your belt this is the basic work history based on performing one inspection per day for every one of the 365 days of the year (excluding the extra day for Leap Years)

10,000 / 365 = 27.4 years of inspecting homes.

If an Inspector wants to perform "Minimalist" inspections, and create boiler plate comments (canned comments that are so generic and useless they are used in every report to reduce writing time), meaningless reports they can perform 2 inspections a day. Using 2 inspections a day for every day of the year yields:

10,000 / 365 = 27.4
27.4 / 2 = 13.7 years of inspecting homes.

There are Inspectors who are performing 3 inspections a day. Of course they eventually are sued out of business. But at 3 inspections per day that works out to:

10,000 / 365 = 27.4
27.4 / 3 = 9.1 years of inspecting homes.

The reality is that no Inspector can even maintain the pace of 1 inspection a day, 365 days out of the year, without burning out quickly. Do you honestly believe that an Inspector, working 365 days a year, and performing 2 inspections a day can last as long as an Inspector performing only 1 a day? Additionally home inspections are cyclic and obviously follow the real estate sales trends. Real estate is sold throughout the year but there are slow periods, holidays, Inspectors must take time off for recurring training requirements, their own health appointments, families, etc., etc., etc. All of this results in less than 365 days out of the year for inspecting, and can result in 60 lost days easily. Using a new number of days in the year of 305 we perform the calculations again and find that the years inspecting have increased significantly to reach your 10,000 requirement.

One inspection a day equals 32.8 years
Two inspections a day equals 16.4 years
Three inspections a day equals 10.9 Years

Yes there are some very long time Inspectors, possibly even some as long as 32.8 years. However you will not find many of them as they extremely rare.

Now I do have a question for you as I would not expect the average consumer to be able to perform this immense task. And as you are being a good Agent/Consultant I would expect that you assist them with this. The question is how are you verifying, beyond doubt, that the Inspector who claims to have performed 10,000+ inspections is telling the truth?

Quote:
Originally Posted by middle-aged mom View Post
People flocked to this profession because of the easy entry requirements and created more supply than demand for services which meant that the cost of a home inspection declined over the past 5 years.
Your statement is partly correct. Just as people flocked to this profession due to easy entry requirements, so too have people flocked to the RE Agent/Consultant profession due to easy entry requirements. You point to the "Supply and Demand" theory as a reason for the declining cost of a home inspection. What data are you using to provide that explanation? If supply and demand were the only cause then why haven't Agent's commissions also decreased from the industry standard 6% (split of course between buyer/seller Agent)? In addition please explain why over the last 18 months the home inspection price structure has not changed from its forced lows, even though the number of Texas Inspectors has decreased by nearly 50%, with only approximately 2500 licensed Inspectors in the entire State of Texas? I understand you are not from Texas, but the "Supply and Demand" theory does not care what state it is in.

There are a great deal more reasons why the cost of an inspection have decreased in many, but nowhere near all, cases. It is unfortunate that consumers are fed the propaganda they are being provided. The importance of an inspection has been downplayed to a "Wal-Mart cost mentality", and not by the Inspectors themselves (for the vast majority of cases). This has come at the expense of the consumer, while the industry players who have caused this situation sit by, hiding behind their rules and laws with impunity to this great consumer fraud.

Last edited by escanlan; 05-24-2010 at 08:29 AM..
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Old 05-24-2010, 10:51 AM
 
Location: Central Texas
16,123 posts, read 21,596,378 times
Reputation: 12132
What I want is an inspector I can feel comfortable recommending to my buyers AND sellers, one that is extremely thorough, but does not take pride in being a "deal breaker" - that is, someone who finds everything but does not feel it is a part of his job to incite panic in any of the parties, but simply to report accurately and thoroughly and be able to explain why he reported a particular item as a concern, if asked.

If he is not all caught up in wars between various trade associations, that's a plus for me, having been a member of associations that got involved in such and knowing that when that happens, the consumer suffers because the attention of the association members is consistently directed more to the war rather than the job they are doing for the consumer.

Which is to say, bottom line, it matters more to me how good a job an inspector does for my sellers and buyers than it does what association they belong to, which matters to me not one whit.

It's sort of like choosing a brokerage to list your house or help you buy one. In the real world, the individual agent is MUCH more important than the brokerage, because unless it's a one-man-shop, a brokerage will have some agents that are simply better at their job than others, just because that's the way life works. That's the agent you want, and that's the inspector you want.
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