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Old 07-08-2008, 08:59 AM
 
Location: Between Seattle and Portland
1,266 posts, read 2,685,973 times
Reputation: 1471

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This is part of a quote I discovered on InterNACHI’s home page while researching home inspector certification requirements:

“ASHI Dumping: ASHI allows unqualified people in our industry by permitting them to join as "candidates" with no requirements other than a $$$. ASHI is a diploma mill. As if this isn't bad enough, ASHI then encourages those candidates to go out and do 250 unqualified inspections to become full members. This of course is bad for consumers, but it has a horrible consequence to our industry. You see these candidates in an effort to get their 250 inspections in, drop their prices, which makes it difficult for existing home inspectors to raise their prices. Home inspectors charge far too little for their services but not because we are stupid, but because of ASHI dumping cheap-charging, desperate to get their inspections in, unqualified candidates into our markets. ASHI's come only with cash candidacy program is nothing short of a diploma mill.”

The founder of InterNACHI also posted this comment:

“If you are a consumer reading this and have been steered toward a patty-cake member of such an association, email me. It's my job to keep the inspection industry clean and I'll help you (at no cost) sue the fake inspector and the agent who referred him/her. Note: I don't help anyone sue other inspectors. I only help sue diploma-mill-association members who were referred by a real estate agent if the consumer is also willing to sue the broker for negligent referral.

Also, I think it is pretty well known in real estate circles, that I regularly offer my expert testimony on behalf of any consumer who was steered by a real estate agent toward any no-entrance-requirements-whatsoever associations like ASHI if the consumer is willing to also sue the broker for negligent referral.”

Whoa! This sounds worse than the Hatfields and McCoys! Could I please get some help from you pros out there explaining what this is all about and what a prospective home inspection purchaser should do???
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Old 07-12-2008, 08:19 PM
 
Location: La Mesa CA
4 posts, read 21,237 times
Reputation: 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by stonecypher5413 View Post
This is part of a quote I discovered on InterNACHI’s home page while researching home inspector certification requirements:

“ASHI Dumping: ASHI allows unqualified people in our industry by permitting them to join as "candidates" with no requirements other than a $$$. ASHI is a diploma mill. As if this isn't bad enough, ASHI then encourages those candidates to go out and do 250 unqualified inspections to become full members. This of course is bad for consumers, but it has a horrible consequence to our industry. You see these candidates in an effort to get their 250 inspections in, drop their prices, which makes it difficult for existing home inspectors to raise their prices. Home inspectors charge far too little for their services but not because we are stupid, but because of ASHI dumping cheap-charging, desperate to get their inspections in, unqualified candidates into our markets. ASHI's come only with cash candidacy program is nothing short of a diploma mill.”

The founder of InterNACHI also posted this comment:

“If you are a consumer reading this and have been steered toward a patty-cake member of such an association, email me. It's my job to keep the inspection industry clean and I'll help you (at no cost) sue the fake inspector and the agent who referred him/her. Note: I don't help anyone sue other inspectors. I only help sue diploma-mill-association members who were referred by a real estate agent if the consumer is also willing to sue the broker for negligent referral.

Also, I think it is pretty well known in real estate circles, that I regularly offer my expert testimony on behalf of any consumer who was steered by a real estate agent toward any no-entrance-requirements-whatsoever associations like ASHI if the consumer is willing to also sue the broker for negligent referral.”

Whoa! This sounds worse than the Hatfields and McCoys! Could I please get some help from you pros out there explaining what this is all about and what a prospective home inspection purchaser should do???
Hey, stonecypher5413.

The feud isn't just between InterNACHI and ASHI. The industry itself is split and feuding because some states have licensing and some don't. There are 50 state home inspector associations and, currently, at least six national associations: InterNACHI, ASHI, NAHI, FREA, HIF, and SPREI.

Out of those, ASHI is the oldest, having been founded in 1976. CREIA in California is the oldest state association, also having been founded in 1976.

InterNACHI is the largest, with about 9,000 members. ASHI has about 3,600, NAHI has about 900, and the others below that. CREIA has about 1,200 members.

When I first got into the home inspection business, I joined all of them to see which one could help me and which one I could help. I believe that one should contribute to associations to which one belongs. After one year, I quit them all. There was too much infighting and none of them were interested in helping the home inspection-buying public; all the money we paid in dues went to salaries for their Chief Executive Officer and staff.

Six months after leaving all the others, I discovered NACHI (now InterNACHI). I joined and have stayed for over five years now. Obviously, when the new kid on the block grows up to be big and successful, others take notice, and sometimes jealousy develops. But the InterNACHI founder is right when he says that all the other associations will let you join just by sending them a check for dues. I can speak from experience. InterNACHI at least requires passing an online knowledge exam. SPREI was the second best that I found because they required a résumé showing experience in real estate. Lacking that experience, one had to work for a year in the profession before again being allowed to apply for membership.

More important than all of that for the home-inspection-buying public is to look at the home inspector's experience. If you're a Realtor, as around your office and find the home inspector who has the best reputation for being nitpicky, a "deal killer" (how I hate that term because home inspectors can't possibly know what to put in a home inspection report that would kill a deal--perhaps it's the sellers who killed the deal for not taking care of the property, or the two Realtors who didn't know how to negotiate, or both the buyer and seller for being obstinate, but not the home inspector), or the one that they would hire to inspect a property that they are going to buy. A good 10-20% of my business in any one year is for Realtors buying properties for themselves or a family member. The rest of the year I never hear from them. Quite telling.

In some instances you can look at price, but that shouldn't be the first question you ask. This is a price-sensitive industry, so home inspectors can get started in the profession simply by being the lowest-priced home inspector. In my case, I try to service all needs by providing different inspection types for different people having different needs, wants, and goals, all at different prices. For example, a seller has a totally different set of goals in a pre-listing inspection than a buyer. A property investor who is buying a 1970s-era home to gut, renovate, and flip has a different set of goals than the seller and buyer.

So if you're a Realtor, find out the needs, wants, and goals of your Client and then seek out a home inspector who can meet those needs, wants, and goals. For example, California has no licensing for home inspectors, whereas Massachusetts and Texas do. Many people who re-locate here from those two states are aghast that we have no licensing for home inspectors. I meet those needs by offering a type of home inspection whereby I take licensed professionals from other industries with me, such as a licensed plumber, a licensed electrician, a licensed roofing contract, etc.

I was a Realtor in Houston for seven years, so I might have a different perspective on this than other home inspectors, but I believe that if we all work together to meet the needs, wants, and goals of our Clients, especially when Realtors and home inspectors have the same Clients, then we can all rest assured that we have done our best for those Clients and that they will refer their family, friends, and business associates to us somewhere down the road, as well as come back to us when they themselves need something.

Hope that helps.
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Old 07-13-2008, 08:54 AM
 
Location: Between Seattle and Portland
1,266 posts, read 2,685,973 times
Reputation: 1471
Thank you, RusselRay, for your excellent reply to my post; it was just what I was looking for to clear the murky waters surrounding the inspection process from the consumer's point of view. Your experience and expertise will guide me when it is time to choose an inspector who, hopefully, will share your service-oriented integrity!
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Old 07-13-2008, 09:19 AM
 
Location: Salem, OR
13,642 posts, read 30,847,196 times
Reputation: 11853
Oregon home inspectors are licensed and have to go through an internship with an experienced home inspector.

If you are concerned ask your agent to give you three names. Call them up and ask for a sample report. The guy I recommend locally has a sample one online, so people can see what he looks at and in what format.

I agree that you want a "deal killer." Deal killers protect the sellers and the buyers. Agents should love deal killers as well since they protect us as well. I just recommended my deal killer inspector to an unrepresented buyer, purchasing one of my listings. The buyer was floored at how thorough he was and that I would recommend someone so nit picky to the "opposite side."

I'm protecting my seller from future lawsuits. Nit picky is good.
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Old 07-13-2008, 01:19 PM
 
Location: St. Charles, MO
2 posts, read 10,212 times
Reputation: 11
Default InterNACHI requirements!

Great post RR,

If one wants to see what what type of requirements one must meet before joining InterNACHI please visit...

http://www.nachi.org/membership.htm


Bill
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Old 07-13-2008, 04:03 PM
 
Location: La Mesa CA
4 posts, read 21,237 times
Reputation: 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Silverfall View Post
I agree that you want a "deal killer." Deal killers protect the sellers and the buyers. Agents should love deal killers as well since they protect us as well. I just recommended my deal killer inspector to an unrepresented buyer, purchasing one of my listings. The buyer was floored at how thorough he was and that I would recommend someone so nit picky to the "opposite side."

I'm protecting my seller from future lawsuits. Nit picky is good.
That should be required reading for every new real estate agent.

If we as service professionals can get past focusing solely on our short term interests—or even the short-term interests of buyers and sellers—and instead focus on meeting the needs, wants, and goals of our Clients, I believe that all of us—agents, buyers, sellers, home inspectors, and anyone else involved in helping the transaction progress to a short-term happy ending—will be even happier over the long-term, and I'm definitely in this for the long-term.

As my wise old grandmother said, "Short-term blinders will cause long-term blindness."
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Old 09-11-2008, 02:13 PM
 
Location: 2 Mechanic St., Easthampton, MA 01027
35 posts, read 171,884 times
Reputation: 37
Default Check With Your State Regulators

In Massachusetts, home inspectors must be licensed. Real estate agents (unless acting as a buyer's agent) are prohibited from referring inspectors or even presenting buyers with a "short list" from which to choose. The reason for this is obvious - a home inspector that finds too many irregularities with the house could kill the deal -- and the agent's commission! Even if your state doesn't regulate home inspectors, it makes sense to find your own inspector based upon your own research. Beware of an inspector who points out deficiencies and then recommends his brother-in-law who can fix them "cheap".

Check out your state's website, look under consumer links, etc. to find information on how to select a home inspector. Good home inspectors usually belong to local business organizations. Ask how many inspections the company has done, ask for referrals from buyers, Google the inspector to see if any complaints come up, etc. Good luck.
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Old 09-11-2008, 03:51 PM
 
Location: Knoxville
4,099 posts, read 19,204,738 times
Reputation: 4650
Just to add my 2 cents.

First off, I will say that I am a proud Member of ASHI for the past 15 years. I have served on both the State and the national level. I served on the ASHI Board of Directors for three years. The ASHI Standards of Practice are well recognized, in fact, many inspectors that don't belong to ASHI, advertise that they meet ASHI Standards. Just check out your phone book to see.

Yes, anyone can join ASHI by sending in a check. Think of it as an application fee. However, and this is the BIG however, you can not be "Certified" or display the ASHI logo on advertising until you have taken two exams, had your reports verified that they actually meet the ASHI Standards, and have completed at least 250 inspections. The main exam is the National Home Inspector Exam (NHIE),and the second one is a test on the ASHI Standards of Practice, and The Code of Ethics.

The NHIE is the exam that is used by almost all of the States that license home inspectors. It is an exam that is given at testing centers by a firm that does testing. It is a proctored exam and is certified each year by an independent auditing firm.

NACHI came upon the home inspection industry just a few years ago. It is owned by a man that has some trouble being factual all the time, or maybe bending the truth is a better way to define it. He has been in court many times, and recently NAHI (National Association of Home Inspectors won a lawsuit against NACHI.

The reason there are many NACHI members is because they offered INSTANT CERTIFICATION if you just sent in a check. They had an on-line exam that was the joke of the industry. Newbies found it a great way to break into the industry with instant certification. Why actually wait until you have done a few inspections?

The membership requirements of ASHI are hard, and that's probably why their numbers are lower than NACHI's, though their numbers have ever been verified, since their books are open for review.

Contrary to what Russell alludes to, ASHI is run by a Board of Directors, not just an E.D. The Directors were elected by their peers to serve and every one of them is a home inspector. Having served as a Director, I can tell you that we have the industry and ASHI at heart, and care deeply about how it's run. The Officers of ASHI (Pres, V.P. Secty, Tres, etc) all came from being Directors. They are also all home inspectors. Yes, there is a paid Executive Director, and paid staff, but the Directors and Officers control the purse strings. BY the way, the ASHI books are available to any member if they want.

I guess the biggest difference is an ASHI inspectors had to work harder and longer to get his/her certification. NAHI is run pretty much the same way as ASHI. CREIA was started by ASHI members in CA and is very close to ASHI.

NACHI is for the people that want it now and don't want to earn it. It's as simple as that.

Russell and I just have a different view of things.
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Old 09-12-2008, 06:51 AM
 
Location: Gorham, Maine
1,812 posts, read 4,191,245 times
Reputation: 1236
Fascinating debate, I'm learning a lot - always do from Home Inspectors. Almost all of my buyer clients ask me for a referral and I'm happy to let them choose a list of both ASHI, InterNACHI and independent inspectors. My company also has clients sign a hold harmless clause, protecting the agents from lawsuits - I recommend all brokers look into this.
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Old 12-26-2008, 02:33 PM
 
1 posts, read 7,936 times
Reputation: 11
We use internachi inspectors because of internachi's requirements. They are at nachi.org/membership.htm
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