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Old 04-04-2011, 06:08 PM
 
Location: Taylors, SC
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Has anybody ever purchased a house that had to be moved from one property to another property? I know it can save alot of $. What are the other pros and cons?
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Old 04-04-2011, 06:09 PM
 
Location: NJ
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Con - you have to move a HOUSE.
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Old 04-04-2011, 06:20 PM
 
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there was a show on cable that did a move of a mid size house about 30 miles away and I think the web site for the show said that the final cost of just the moving was something like $170,000 not including the house and the new lot. The trucking expenses was a big part but the cost to utilities, police, highway dept, permits etc was another big expense. There were cost on the new land for foundatuions, water, electricity, etc. The house also had to be fixed because the move cause damages that had to be repaired (and some of it had to be made to current building codes).

I think a lot depends on the house, where it going,, how it gets there and what has to be done enroute from one point to another. You may have savings when all is done or you may have spent more than what you could have built a new house for.
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Old 04-04-2011, 06:57 PM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
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Lots of logistics past just moving the house:
traffic control
power lines may need to come down
possible bonding for the roads used

In addition to the lifting and stabilizing of the house prior to moving it, disconnecting the utility service lines, etc.

I've seen it where the house was bought for very little (in one case a dollar) and for various historical, architectural or other reasons was worth saving.

One family here had their house moved twice, at MD Highway expense, to accomodate highway expansion. The third time they moved.
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Old 04-04-2011, 09:14 PM
 
Location: Knoxville
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While I have never moved a house of my own, in a past life I was a project manager and was involved with the relocation of over 100 buildings. Some were as small as 30x30, others were much larger.

Experienced house movers make the job look effortless. There are a lot of logistics that need to be taken care of, but most of the time, they are done by the movers.

There is a lot of work involved in getting the house ready to move. That means a lot of "damage" that is going to need to be repaired.

There is a fair amount of damage that occurs during the move. Think of the move as a bunch of small earthquakes. While the building goes down the road fairly slow, there is a lot of movement. Stuff (like walls, ceilings, floors) moves. Cabinets may fall off the walls.

Then when the building gets to its new home, the utilities and foundation have to be put in place. This is where you really need an experienced contractor that has done this before. Then the building is set on its new foundation.

Thats when the real fun starts.

Many of the buildings we moved survived the move just fine. Some needed very little work inside (those were usually the ones that had very few interior walls/rooms and were pretty small, AND didn't have to move very far).

We also had some mishaps that might have made good TV. We had a building slide off the carrier when an axle snapped. The building did a slow motion roll off and kind of fell apart in the middle of an intersection at 3 am.

Like others have said, dealing with the local code people can be a huge problem. It depends on the location.
The costs for the land, foundation, utilities are going to be the same no matter if you move a house or build new.
I guess the biggest problem comes from unforeseen issues that come up BECAUSE of the move.
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Old 04-05-2011, 01:40 PM
 
Location: Taylors, SC
8,807 posts, read 14,602,798 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Barking Spider View Post
While I have never moved a house of my own, in a past life I was a project manager and was involved with the relocation of over 100 buildings. Some were as small as 30x30, others were much larger.

Experienced house movers make the job look effortless. There are a lot of logistics that need to be taken care of, but most of the time, they are done by the movers.

There is a lot of work involved in getting the house ready to move. That means a lot of "damage" that is going to need to be repaired.

There is a fair amount of damage that occurs during the move. Think of the move as a bunch of small earthquakes. While the building goes down the road fairly slow, there is a lot of movement. Stuff (like walls, ceilings, floors) moves. Cabinets may fall off the walls.

Then when the building gets to its new home, the utilities and foundation have to be put in place. This is where you really need an experienced contractor that has done this before. Then the building is set on its new foundation.

Thats when the real fun starts.

Many of the buildings we moved survived the move just fine. Some needed very little work inside (those were usually the ones that had very few interior walls/rooms and were pretty small, AND didn't have to move very far).

We also had some mishaps that might have made good TV. We had a building slide off the carrier when an axle snapped. The building did a slow motion roll off and kind of fell apart in the middle of an intersection at 3 am.

Like others have said, dealing with the local code people can be a huge problem. It depends on the location.
The costs for the land, foundation, utilities are going to be the same no matter if you move a house or build new.
I guess the biggest problem comes from unforeseen issues that come up BECAUSE of the move.
Are these unforeseen issues recognizable immediately or you stumble across them months later?
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Old 04-05-2011, 05:58 PM
 
Location: Cape Coral, FL
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My Mom was once married to a house mover. In NC. We were doing a demolition/remodel on our house, and I remember seeing the new master suit being driven down the road on a semi. HA! Pretty crazy!

It is expensive. Get a boat
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Old 04-05-2011, 08:49 PM
 
Location: Knoxville
3,328 posts, read 10,707,347 times
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The unforeseen issues usually came up after the building was brought to the new location. It usually came down to how the building faired during the move. Some made the move with very little problems, hardly any cracks even. Others had major movement inside (doors, walls, floors, ceilings). I think it had to do with the original construction quality, age, and how easy the ride was down the road.
Kind of like houses in an earthquake. Houses on the same block would differ quite a bit in the damage, even though they were built about the same time, and were basically the same house. In the 72 Sylmar earthquake I lived a little over a mile from the epicenter. My apartment had some broken windows and some cabinets came off the wall, and my refrigerator fell over. The apartment across the street had the entire front wall fall off. It looked like a doll house.
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Old 04-06-2011, 12:51 PM
 
Location: Taylors, SC
8,807 posts, read 14,602,798 times
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I have clarify things with the seller to see if he takes care of any issues that have occured during the move. It's probably better to have that backing knowing if something pops up, he will fix it.
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Old 04-06-2011, 01:12 PM
 
Location: NJ
17,580 posts, read 20,658,964 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beckycat View Post
I have clarify things with the seller to see if he takes care of any issues that have occured during the move. It's probably better to have that backing knowing if something pops up, he will fix it.
I think a seller would have to be insane to agree to that.
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