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Old 05-09-2011, 11:05 PM
 
5,697 posts, read 19,072,739 times
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Curious from a selling stand point, is only having one sink in the master bath a hard sell? When we bought our house 2 yrs ago we didn't think much about it because it was our first home that even had a master bath so we were stoked. Recently we had a scare regarding my husband's job where we had that moment of ut oh, we might have to move. So then I got thinking about what might turn off a buyer if we had to sell. The one sink in the master bath came to mind. Everything worked out with hubby's job but in 4 yrs there may be further cut backs so we have that on our minds.

So curious...are double sinks in a master bath considered a must have for most buyers?
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Old 05-09-2011, 11:26 PM
 
28,455 posts, read 84,928,817 times
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There is never really a "must have", right now the way to think about things in a buyers market is more like "this is gonna take a MUCH bigger price cut because the house lacks XXXX & YYYYY"...

Seriously, shoppers have TONS of choices. If they see a house that is pretty but LACKS features that will be expensive / impossible to add they expect A BIG price cut...

I generally recommend that home owners BUDGET for some planned UPGRADES about every five years or so -- if that means you skip a few years for a BIGGER upgrade that works too, but the idea is that for things like kitchens, baths, landscaping, family rooms, master suite, maybe even garage you check trends so that you are NEVER the least upgraded house on the market should you need to sell. It is tricky to ALSO stay on top of normal MAINTENANCE items (like furnance, roof, paint, flooring etc) without going over board /over budget. The temptation to go TOO HIGHEND / SPECIALIZED might actually make it harder to get your money back.

I still see LOTS of even BRAND NEW homes that have master baths that look more "Motel 6" than "luxury spa" but if you are SMART about shopping you can often UPGRADE in a way that really does does make your home sell FASTER and FOR MORE MONEY than dated competition.

Any home owner ought to be able to pick up the TRICKS of shows like "designed to sell" -- modern paint colors and cheap towels in fresh colors help GREATLY.

Of course you can lose sight of the "big picture" if you don't consider who is LIKELY TO BUY YOUR HOUSE -- if you are in an area where say all the other homes have fenced yards (which some times are prefered by people with young children) or first floor master suites (which tend to be high on the wish list of older buyers) there are other things that sorta flow alook with such homes -- young couples will want a convenient baby's room while older couples might prefer a home office or well isolated "guest suite".

My suggestion is to make an effort to check out nearby open houses, especially when you have an inkling from checking them out online for signs of professional staging. In my experience homes that are staged into a a complete "picture" that match what local buyers are seeking give great insight into where your more discretionary upgrade dollars should be targeted!
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Old 05-10-2011, 03:47 AM
 
Location: Perry South, Pittsburgh, PA
1,437 posts, read 2,858,906 times
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I've been in one house in my life with any bathroom having two sinks.
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Old 05-10-2011, 06:39 AM
 
64 posts, read 194,907 times
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I think it depends on your area (i.e. if your competing against new construction) and price range.

It seems like new construction is more likely to have dual sinks. But, in my area, there isn't much new construction. So it tends to be that only the homes with extensive remodels or very expensive homes have dual sinks. In the mid-price range of homes, dual sinks in the master isn't very common here.
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Old 05-10-2011, 07:58 AM
 
Location: The Triad
34,091 posts, read 82,455,924 times
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I say that having a well laid out vanity top with lots of flat surface and cubbies and actual cabinets to put away all the "stuff" that accumulates is far more important than having a second sink bowl.

So even if you have the space... don't add the second bowl.
Make the countertop big and set the bowl to one end of that.
---

For the actually married and/or have been with the same spouse for more than 5 years:
How often are you BOTH in the bathroom doing your stuff at the same time?

I don't mean popping in for a second to get something...
I mean standing side by side brushing teeth or shaving while she does make up etc?

Right. That's the point.
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Old 05-10-2011, 10:50 AM
 
5,697 posts, read 19,072,739 times
Reputation: 8694
Quote:
Originally Posted by chet everett View Post
There is never really a "must have", right now the way to think about things in a buyers market is more like "this is gonna take a MUCH bigger price cut because the house lacks XXXX & YYYYY"...

Seriously, shoppers have TONS of choices. If they see a house that is pretty but LACKS features that will be expensive / impossible to add they expect A BIG price cut...

I generally recommend that home owners BUDGET for some planned UPGRADES about every five years or so -- if that means you skip a few years for a BIGGER upgrade that works too, but the idea is that for things like kitchens, baths, landscaping, family rooms, master suite, maybe even garage you check trends so that you are NEVER the least upgraded house on the market should you need to sell. It is tricky to ALSO stay on top of normal MAINTENANCE items (like furnance, roof, paint, flooring etc) without going over board /over budget. The temptation to go TOO HIGHEND / SPECIALIZED might actually make it harder to get your money back.

I still see LOTS of even BRAND NEW homes that have master baths that look more "Motel 6" than "luxury spa" but if you are SMART about shopping you can often UPGRADE in a way that really does does make your home sell FASTER and FOR MORE MONEY than dated competition.

Any home owner ought to be able to pick up the TRICKS of shows like "designed to sell" -- modern paint colors and cheap towels in fresh colors help GREATLY.

Of course you can lose sight of the "big picture" if you don't consider who is LIKELY TO BUY YOUR HOUSE -- if you are in an area where say all the other homes have fenced yards (which some times are prefered by people with young children) or first floor master suites (which tend to be high on the wish list of older buyers) there are other things that sorta flow alook with such homes -- young couples will want a convenient baby's room while older couples might prefer a home office or well isolated "guest suite".

My suggestion is to make an effort to check out nearby open houses, especially when you have an inkling from checking them out online for signs of professional staging. In my experience homes that are staged into a a complete "picture" that match what local buyers are seeking give great insight into where your more discretionary upgrade dollars should be targeted!
Thanks for the reply. I get what you are saying about small upgrades along the way. We have always done this. I'm definitely one of those types that are really into the house thing. I am always doing something to our houses, which at times drives my husband nuts but he actually enjoys it too (after he is done moaning and it's done). He is skilled trades so when we do major renovations it is work we do ourselves enabling us to do more high end stuff without the price. Of course all within reason. I have sold enough homes to have a good idea of what return we would get from such projects. In my experience the little things mean a lot. Changing out interior doors, light fixtures, plumbing fixtures etc. It doesn't really bring in the bigger bucks per say but the over all appeal can make our homes stand out from the rest. We have a home built in the 90's so the house doesn't need major renovations but we have phased out the 90's mostly. I changed out all the door knobs and hinges from brass to rubbed bronze. It does make the house feel newer. Our neighbor even noticed when he popped in the other day. He asked if we replaced our doors because they looked new to him.

In that thinking though, I can stand back and take most of the emotion out of it and look at my home's flaws and think what would be a big deterrent in a future sale. The master bath came to mind. Since moving to Indiana it has been a bit difficult to keep an eye on what sells for what though. In a way I like the non disclosure (nosey in-laws wanted to know what we paid for our house and when we wouldn't tell them, they tried to look it up and couldnt) but then I don't like it because I can only judge on what a house has sold for. In Michigan where I am from, its mostly public record. So in a way, buying houses there was easier cuz I could tell how much market increased or fell in a specific time frame. Here, not so much. From an amateur status, it doesn't seem this part of Indiana experienced the large boom like where I am from so I don't think the houses have fell that much in value over time. Again, only a guess.

When we were looking at houses in our specific price point, some houses had two sinks, some didn't. Honestly, in the 20 yrs my husband and I have been together we have never tried to groom ourselves at the same time so I guess I didn't really think too much about it. But then I hear people say they wouldn't buy a house without a large master bath with two sinks. Soo...that is why I was curious on what others thought. If only one sink was a major issue.
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Old 05-10-2011, 11:41 AM
 
5,697 posts, read 19,072,739 times
Reputation: 8694
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrRational View Post
I say that having a well laid out vanity top with lots of flat surface and cubbies and actual cabinets to put away all the "stuff" that accumulates is far more important than having a second sink bowl.

So even if you have the space... don't add the second bowl.
Make the countertop big and set the bowl to one end of that.
---

For the actually married and/or have been with the same spouse for more than 5 years:
How often are you BOTH in the bathroom doing your stuff at the same time?

I don't mean popping in for a second to get something...
I mean standing side by side brushing teeth or shaving while she does make up etc?

Right. That's the point.
Been with hubby for 20 yrs, and we have never tried to get ready in the mornings at the same time. He is a slob and I wouldn't want to be next to him in there anyway. lol. So it wasn't something that I thought about (needing 2 sinks bowls) when we were looking to buy. The bathroom is of average size. No separate sunken tub, separate shower etc, just a regular bathroom. The sink base is 30 inches. It is not huge, just basic but the storage is excellent. We have a full closet in the bathroom. Not a clothes closet but more of a linen style. I store everything in it from towels, shampoo, razors etc. It is quite roomy. I actually have nothing under the vanity but one bottle of bathroom cleaner. But for a buyer that wants to set out a ton of crap on the counter, that will be a problem. The sink top is only big enough to set down a hair dryer and so forth while getting ready. You can't leave that stuff out all the time.
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Old 05-10-2011, 11:48 AM
 
Location: Maine
2,272 posts, read 6,643,851 times
Reputation: 2563
If I had my way, there would be two separate master bathrooms. That way he can have his own one to mess up -- hair and water all over sink after shaving, dirty clothes thrown NEXT TO the hamper, and we won't even begin to discuss the toilet.
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Old 05-10-2011, 01:02 PM
 
Location: The Triad
34,091 posts, read 82,455,924 times
Reputation: 43647
Quote:
Originally Posted by lawmom View Post
If I had my way, there would be two separate master bathrooms. That way he can have his own one to mess up -- hair and water all over sink after shaving, dirty clothes thrown NEXT TO the hamper, and we won't even begin to discuss the toilet.
I don't believe men and women were meant to live together. I think perhaps they should just live next door and visit now and then. -- Katherine Hepburn
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Old 05-10-2011, 01:35 PM
 
Location: IL
2,987 posts, read 5,225,466 times
Reputation: 3111
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrRational View Post
For the actually married and/or have been with the same spouse for more than 5 years:
How often are you BOTH in the bathroom doing your stuff at the same time?

I don't mean popping in for a second to get something...
I mean standing side by side brushing teeth or shaving while she does make up etc?

Right. That's the point.
Married for 7 years, we get ready at night (brush teeth, wash face) at the same time probably 5 times a week. In the mornings we don't get ready at the same time anymore because she is a SAHM now, but we used to daily since we commuted together. We could get by without two sinks, and I doubt it would be a deal-breaker, but we do use them simultaneously frequently...and my wife doesn't like my junk over in her "space".
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