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Old 12-28-2011, 05:19 PM
 
Location: Portland, OR
1,082 posts, read 2,034,116 times
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My wife and I live in Oregon, and we're planning to buy a brand new house next year that uses energy-efficient construction. I realize that's not much to go on, because whatever house we get hasn't even been built yet, but in terms of square footage, would a 3,000-sf, two-story house cost significantly more to heat and cool in the PNW climate than a 2,500-sf, two-story house? In the houses we've been looking at, there's little difference in monthly-payment costs at today's interest rates, and the extra space would be nice for several reasons (yeah, we realize it will be more work to clean), but energy costs are another factor in the equation.
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Old 12-28-2011, 05:31 PM
 
Location: The Triad (NC)
26,877 posts, read 57,944,657 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HonuMan View Post
would a 3,000-sf, two-story house cost more to heat and cool
than a 2,500-sf, two-story house?
Yes. You can reasonably expect that a 20% larger anything
will require about 20% more energy to heat/cool than a smaller one.

Where any savings MAY show up... is in retention of that heat and cooling.

hth
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Old 12-28-2011, 06:02 PM
 
Location: Louisville KY Metro area
4,824 posts, read 12,485,940 times
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I am in Kentucky, so I have no clue of the issues for your actual climate and energy availability, but if I were building new in Kentucky, I would do two things. First, I would go to the expense of a dual fuel system. I would have a gas fired furnace with a geo-thermal electric heat pump. I would also be certain to use a multi-zone system with electronic baffles rather than multiple heat pumps.

As a Realtor, the ability to take advantage of both gas and electricity are very important selling features. Having gas also means there is a easy hook-up to an emergency generator.

Last edited by tomocox; 12-28-2011 at 06:46 PM..
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Old 12-28-2011, 09:52 PM
 
Location: Portland, OR
1,082 posts, read 2,034,116 times
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Thanks to both of you for your responses!
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Old 12-29-2011, 04:59 PM
 
69,372 posts, read 53,627,725 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrRational View Post
Yes. You can reasonably expect that a 20% larger anything
will require about 20% more energy to heat/cool than a smaller one.
Thats not necessarily true.

I have a 6,000 sf home, and my heating bills are actually cheaper than my last 1,500 sf home.

New home has 3 furnaces, + zone heating which saves a lot over the single furnace layout we had previously.

It might be more beneficial and efficient for the OP to split the 3,000 sf home into 2 furances, rather than 1 furnace for a 2,500 home.
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