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Old 04-08-2012, 07:05 PM
 
Location: Salem, OR
10,867 posts, read 18,221,734 times
Reputation: 6743
Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasHorseLady View Post

Silverfall, being extremely good at your job won't keep you from being sued, trust me on this one. We turned down numerous cases (about 295 out of 300 cases, monthly) because there was no case there, which didn't stop many of them from finding an attorney who would sue on the hope that the insurance company of the defendant would settle rather than fight because of the expense involved - and it was a good bet that they would, shame to say.
Of course it won't prevent it. It just reduces your risk. We were talking about risk reduction. There is no such thing as eliminating risk in real estate. It is a risky profession.
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Old 04-10-2012, 11:21 AM
 
613 posts, read 729,584 times
Reputation: 379
Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasHorseLady View Post
I do have one inspector that a strongly prefer first time home buyers use, but I still give them options. The reason I prefer they use him? He's VERY thorough, while not thinking it's his job to incite panic, he tells them if something he finds is a $10 fix at Home Depot or a serious safety issue that needs to be addressed right away (and everything in between), and he's very good at telling them why something is a problem if it is and when it's not up to code but was up to code when the house was built (and if the code changed last week, he'll tell them that, too). He'll give them tips on keeping things running well (very useful for first time homeowners who used to leave all that to the landlord). He's just a damned good inspector with a talent for working with first time buyers.

But if they choose one of the others on my list, they're all good inspectors, no problem; if they choose one not on my list, I'll be paying even closer attention at the inspection to see if they should be on it.

So an agent recommending an inspector or inspectors doesn't have to set alarm bells ringing - there could be very good reasons, based on attending/reading dozens or even hundreds of inspections/inspection reports, for their preference. It all boils down to, do you trust your agent or not, as Silverfall said.
Inspector knows local code or most of codes are the same in general?
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Old 04-10-2012, 02:27 PM
 
Location: Central Texas
16,287 posts, read 22,252,993 times
Reputation: 12449
He knows local and state codes and anything that would be national and the HUGE book he carries around (thing must be six or seven inches thick - as the wife of a former printer I wonder how the heck they did that!!) has the majority of them, evidently, if he should need to prove a point.
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Old 04-10-2012, 04:15 PM
 
576 posts, read 742,381 times
Reputation: 459
Quote:
Originally Posted by Missingatlanta View Post
I am in the process of buying a foreclosed house. My realtor emailed me with the inspector she wants us to use. I've heard it's not good to go with the realtor recommendations for inspectors and financing. Should we find our own inspector?
Here in Texas the answer to that is maybe! I work with a lot of buyers and get to see a lot of those inspection reports. Here in Texas there is a huge problem with realtor recommended inspectors. From what I see at least 80% of those recommended inspectors need to find a new career!! Of course that is the way the realtors like it here because the dumber they are the less they find, and the less they find the less chance you will walk away from your purchase.

There are some realtor recommended inspectors that are good but those are few and far between. You have to remember that the realtor is the only one that has their hands in all aspects of your home buying and they have a large financial interest in making sure you don't back out of the home buying. Remember that 80% figure above? It is a direct reflection on the honesty of the realtors.

colincobre provided a very good link Ten Things Your Real Estate Agent Won't Tell You - Massachusetts Relocation - Homebuyers Resource Center (http://www.thebuyersbroker.com/homebuyers/html/ten_things.html - broken link) . That guy is a real estate broker and not just a lowly "salesperson" and he is giving this advice which is pretty much on the mark where it concerns that 80% mentioned above. His article, and the newer one colincobre posted, can be applied to just about any state in the country and is very general. You should read the comments to the money article (second one posted) as the people who agree with it display a large degree of intelligence in their remarks.

This is the biggest purchase you are going to make in your life. You are also going to be stuck with that bill for the life of your mortgage. Do you want to trust a person that stands to make a large amount of money from referring someone bad and is able to walk away scott free when you get burned?? Take the time and check out the home inspector no matter where you get the referral from!

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Old 04-10-2012, 04:42 PM
 
Location: Cary, NC
19,459 posts, read 30,426,737 times
Reputation: 16426
Quote:
Originally Posted by colincobre View Post
If I was an agent I would say the same exact thing so the inspection wouldn't kill the deal. And I wouldn't have to spend next couple dozen weeks walking buyers through houses on Saturdays.
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbiggs View Post
Here in Texas the answer to that is maybe! I work with a lot of buyers and get to see a lot of those inspection reports. Here in Texas there is a huge problem with realtor recommended inspectors. From what I see at least 80% of those recommended inspectors need to find a new career!! Of course that is the way the realtors like it here because the dumber they are the less they find, and the less they find the less chance you will walk away from your purchase.

There are some realtor recommended inspectors that are good but those are few and far between. You have to remember that the realtor is the only one that has their hands in all aspects of your home buying and they have a large financial interest in making sure you don't back out of the home buying. Remember that 80% figure above? It is a direct reflection on the honesty of the realtors.

colincobre provided a very good link Ten Things Your Real Estate Agent Won't Tell You - Massachusetts Relocation - Homebuyers Resource Center (http://www.thebuyersbroker.com/homebuyers/html/ten_things.html - broken link) . That guy is a real estate broker and not just a lowly "salesperson" and he is giving this advice which is pretty much on the mark where it concerns that 80% mentioned above. His article, and the newer one colincobre posted, can be applied to just about any state in the country and is very general. You should read the comments to the money article (second one posted) as the people who agree with it display a large degree of intelligence in their remarks.

This is the biggest purchase you are going to make in your life. You are also going to be stuck with that bill for the life of your mortgage. Do you want to trust a person that stands to make a large amount of money from referring someone bad and is able to walk away scott free when you get burned?? Take the time and check out the home inspector no matter where you get the referral from!
Your compadre, colincobre, like his quoted real estate "broker" oracle, qualified himself well and clearly regarding his character, and it is noteworthy that you find him quotable and trustworthy.
[quote=colincobre;23768580]
"If I was an agent I would say the same exact thing so the inspection wouldn't kill the deal."
"If I was an agent I would say the same exact thing so the inspection wouldn't kill the deal."
"If I was an agent I would say the same exact thing so the inspection wouldn't kill the deal."
A pitiful display, in my opinion, but laudable to some others.

The OP has a nice challenge, picking good advice, from people who work in the field, or from those who say they would be all too glad to steal her blind IF they worked in the field and had an open shot at her purse.
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Old 04-10-2012, 04:52 PM
 
157 posts, read 248,371 times
Reputation: 78
I would not go with real estate agent's recommendation. I did and lived to regret it because the agent really wanted to sale to go thru. Her inspector didn't list a number of clear code violations that I've found out since then.

He pointed out things that the dishwasher not working (which I could tell) and not things like the fact that there was no flashing between deck and house and no joist hangers on deck and back deck posts having brick under them to make them high enough. He didn't even point out that the bedcroom windows don't meet egress requirements.... Very poor inspection I'm still paying for as I get everything fixed.
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Old 04-10-2012, 05:05 PM
 
Location: Central Texas
16,287 posts, read 22,252,993 times
Reputation: 12449
jbiggs, what exactly do you do that you work with a lot of buyers and get to see a lot of inspection reports?
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Old 04-10-2012, 05:53 PM
 
576 posts, read 742,381 times
Reputation: 459
Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasHorseLady View Post
jbiggs, what exactly do you do that you work with a lot of buyers and get to see a lot of inspection reports?
I do a lot of different things and not just for buyers of homes, I also work with those that these buyers call to get messes straightened out. I work with sellers and I work with homeowners that are not even selling. I perform a lot of other consulting as well on a variety of subjects.

What that 20% of good Texas realtors need to do is police their own and do something about the other 80%. In the process you will get rid of a lot of worthless home inspectors as well. As for the good realtors if you really want to see how your favorite inspectors actually stack up why don't you take their reports, as well as other pertinent information regarding the home, and give it to a professional consultant to review? It is amazing the number of blatant problems that are shown right in the report photos that are never called out by the home inspector!! Then there are the number of blatantly obvious defects that are downplayed in the way they are written. I've read some well written wording on some very serious safety defects that have obviously an intentionally been sugar coated to downplay their importance.

The reports I really have to laugh at are the ones where the home inspector says more about how "the home has so much appeal because of the craftsmanship...", "the home displays all of the characteristics of a well built home...", blah, blah, blah. Those reports are more for the benefit of the realtor to help them sell the home than the buyer to understand its condition. Those reports are so chocked full of puke remarks it is amazing that any home buyer would not feel they were not getting ripped off!

Of course I shouldn't complain about it because the more it happens the more money I make afterward. But it really does get pathetic to see how many people out there get ripped off during a home purchase.
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Old 04-10-2012, 06:06 PM
 
576 posts, read 742,381 times
Reputation: 459
Quote:
Originally Posted by equinox1 View Post
I would not go with real estate agent's recommendation. I did and lived to regret it because the agent really wanted to sale to go thru. Her inspector didn't list a number of clear code violations that I've found out since then.

He pointed out things that the dishwasher not working (which I could tell) and not things like the fact that there was no flashing between deck and house and no joist hangers on deck and back deck posts having brick under them to make them high enough. He didn't even point out that the bedcroom windows don't meet egress requirements.... Very poor inspection I'm still paying for as I get everything fixed.
The rule of thumb for most of those home inspectors is if there is no blatantly obvious problem that is actually causing a problem at the time they inspect then don't bother reporting it as that is just extra time for inspecting and reporting. After all once you bought the house any problems after can easily be blamed on you unless it has a clear history of the problem being there in the first place. Also the longer it takes a problem to show itself the easier it is to blame it on the new homeowner's actions or failure to act.

For the flashing problem if it is not causing water damage, and the roof looks old anyhow, the home inspector will pass it up and say something to the effect that they made some ignorant statement telling you the roof needed attention. As for the joist hangers unless the deck is rickity or a problem then they pass it off as no trouble found at the time of the inspection. It doesn't matter that possibly the joist hangers should have been there. I don't know how he got away with the bricks under the support posts and your realtor did not say anything either??
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Old 04-10-2012, 06:09 PM
 
Location: Columbia, SC
6,983 posts, read 10,832,879 times
Reputation: 3524
Quote:
Originally Posted by colincobre View Post
I reveal ethical orientation of almost every agent out there. Agents really want clients money and that's all they care about. Tell me that's not true!
It's not true. It's easier that I recommend good inspectors/contractors because they'll keep me out of court and keep my clients happy and referring other friends family. Why would I turn such a valuable source of business against me for a quick buck? That would be penny wise but pound foolish. IMO, you reveal much about yourself with such thoughts. As a side note, most of my inspectors and contractors on my list I have personally used. The ones I haven't came from really good experiences where they were introduced by my client or the other agent and I was impressed.

Oh, welcome to the party. We'll enjoy your presence for a few weeks until you get tired of pushing your agenda and giving bad advice to consumers along the way until you get tired of posting and disappear.
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