U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Real Estate
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 06-08-2012, 07:40 PM
 
Location: US Empire, Pac NW
5,008 posts, read 10,454,074 times
Reputation: 4125

Advertisements

On the very first day we got the keys to our house, we met the neighbors, and they all seemed fine. There was one lady who I initially wrote off as the neighborhood gossip spinster, who said that the prior tenant (the sellers' son) had died of a drug overdose.

We were going to get our locks changed anyway, so that just lit the fire under our butts to do so. We also priced in some of the initial home repairs as well... so that wasn't as big a deal.

Then it got me curious. I remembered that the exhaust for our hot water tank was totally disconnected from the exhaust pipe leading to the outside. It was PVC and the prior owner probably never realized it was disconnected or bothered with cycling the hydronic heating system (that much is obvious by how much air was in it when we did it, along with little chips that I believe to be the impeller on the pump).

The plumber who came to fix it told me that it is state code to have purple primer and yellow paste to affix the PVC to the hot water tank exhaust, and it bewildered him that it passed inspection. He said the prior owner was probably constantly sick, and there weren't any carbon monoxide detectors in the house prior to us moving in.

That got us thinking, and a quick call to the seller's agent confirmed he had died in the house, but didn't say how. A police report filed in the newspaper said a friend discovered him in the living room, but nothing more detailed.

Now, normally, state law only requires disclosure if the prior owner had been murdered.

I can only imagine how my mom would feel if she lost me or if I lost my wife. I don't have any kids yet, so I can only imagine the pain they felt and probably still feel.

On the same token however, if there's a reason why he died so young (he was 26) I'd like to know what it was if it was safety related.

How should I go about asking the sellers about this? Or should I completely butt out (that's what my gut says)? If I should butt out and mind my own business how can I rest my mind about the safety aspects? As I said, we changed the locks and fixed the hot water tank venting issue and installed carbon monoxide detectors. Any other suggestions?

On a side: if their son had died of carbon monoxide poisoning, I should probably tell them about the exhaust issue and ask if they considered suing the builder and/or the inspectors. Another reason why I feel like asking ... but it is delicate, so I'm being cautious ...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-08-2012, 08:31 PM
 
5,645 posts, read 6,456,872 times
Reputation: 4928
Default Try to Forget About It

Quote:
Originally Posted by eskercurve View Post
On the very first day we got the keys to our house, we met the neighbors, and they all seemed fine. There was one lady who I initially wrote off as the neighborhood gossip spinster, who said that the prior tenant (the sellers' son) had died of a drug overdose.

We were going to get our locks changed anyway, so that just lit the fire under our butts to do so. We also priced in some of the initial home repairs as well... so that wasn't as big a deal.

Then it got me curious. I remembered that the exhaust for our hot water tank was totally disconnected from the exhaust pipe leading to the outside. It was PVC and the prior owner probably never realized it was disconnected or bothered with cycling the hydronic heating system (that much is obvious by how much air was in it when we did it, along with little chips that I believe to be the impeller on the pump).

The plumber who came to fix it told me that it is state code to have purple primer and yellow paste to affix the PVC to the hot water tank exhaust, and it bewildered him that it passed inspection. He said the prior owner was probably constantly sick, and there weren't any carbon monoxide detectors in the house prior to us moving in.

That got us thinking, and a quick call to the seller's agent confirmed he had died in the house, but didn't say how. A police report filed in the newspaper said a friend discovered him in the living room, but nothing more detailed.

Now, normally, state law only requires disclosure if the prior owner had been murdered.

I can only imagine how my mom would feel if she lost me or if I lost my wife. I don't have any kids yet, so I can only imagine the pain they felt and probably still feel.

On the same token however, if there's a reason why he died so young (he was 26) I'd like to know what it was if it was safety related.

How should I go about asking the sellers about this? Or should I completely butt out (that's what my gut says)? If I should butt out and mind my own business how can I rest my mind about the safety aspects? As I said, we changed the locks and fixed the hot water tank venting issue and installed carbon monoxide detectors. Any other suggestions?

On a side: if their son had died of carbon monoxide poisoning, I should probably tell them about the exhaust issue and ask if they considered suing the builder and/or the inspectors. Another reason why I feel like asking ... but it is delicate, so I'm being cautious ...
Best not to contact the sellers. Actually, I think you'd have a good case for a lawsuit for non-disclosure, but it sounds like that's not something you would want to do. Perhaps the son committed suicide? Lots of houses won't sell if there was a murder in the house. Don't find out, so that YOU don't have to disclose that if you ever decide to sell.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-08-2012, 10:31 PM
 
Location: NJ
17,579 posts, read 38,295,421 times
Reputation: 16098
Leave it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-08-2012, 10:47 PM
 
Location: Kailua Kona, HI
3,199 posts, read 10,961,982 times
Reputation: 3378
I am very glad that you checked things out and got that water heater fixed right away. I too am surprised that your home inspection did not reveal this.

I also agree w/ the other 2 posters that you are probably best leaving the issue alone.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-09-2012, 12:31 AM
 
Location: US Empire, Pac NW
5,008 posts, read 10,454,074 times
Reputation: 4125
A little clarification ... it definitely didn't pass my home inspection (my home inspector pointed that out definitely and is in our report, and I was there during the inspection).

The plumber was mystified as to how it passed the initial home build inspection as the house was built (it's a pretty new construction, 2007). It's state law to have a certain primer and glue and it obviously didn't, it was only silicone gel.

And the sellers weren't required to disclose precisely because their son wasn't murdered in the house.

I'm inclined to leave it be too.

But now the real question is, now that I know this, what would you all do? How would you ensure there isn't some other safety hazard?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-09-2012, 05:50 AM
 
Location: So Ca
13,877 posts, read 13,545,555 times
Reputation: 11808
Quote:
Originally Posted by eskercurve View Post
But now the real question is, now that I know this, what would you all do? How would you ensure there isn't some other safety hazard?
I thought you said that your home inspection report picked up all safety hazards (including this one, which you've corrected). It sounds like a tragic story with the sellers' son. You're right to leave it alone.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-09-2012, 06:44 AM
 
Location: NJ
17,579 posts, read 38,295,421 times
Reputation: 16098
Quote:
Originally Posted by eskercurve View Post

But now the real question is, now that I know this, what would you all do? How would you ensure there isn't some other safety hazard?
How do you ever ensure there are no safety hazards? Get another inspection if it will make you feel any better and have them concentrate on safety items.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-09-2012, 08:26 AM
 
Location: Philaburbia
31,165 posts, read 57,288,199 times
Reputation: 52030
Quote:
Originally Posted by eskercurve View Post
But now the real question is, now that I know this, what would you all do? How would you ensure there isn't some other safety hazard?
You fixed the problem at hand; let it go.

You can have the house inspected, repaired and renovated to the rafters, and it will won't ensure you'll be freed from hazards or accidents in perpetuity. Life happens.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-09-2012, 08:33 AM
 
Location: Knoxville
4,135 posts, read 19,725,943 times
Reputation: 4727
Your home inspector pointed out a problem with the vent. You were getting it fixed and the plumber "wondered" why it passed inspection in the first place. Correct? Sounds like your inspector did a good job.

OK, if that's the case, and the vent is now fixed, you don't have a safety issue with the vent.

As far as the plumber wondering how something passed inspection in the first place goes, it happens all the time. Sad, but true.

As far as the man that died in the house goes, its tragic, and may have been carbon monoxide, but maybe not. I say leave it alone and move on with your life.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-09-2012, 10:14 AM
 
Location: US Empire, Pac NW
5,008 posts, read 10,454,074 times
Reputation: 4125
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
You fixed the problem at hand; let it go.

You can have the house inspected, repaired and renovated to the rafters, and it will won't ensure you'll be freed from hazards or accidents in perpetuity. Life happens.
This is the best advice. Thanks everyone.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Real Estate
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top