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Old 06-21-2012, 04:51 PM
 
3 posts, read 8,221 times
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We're building a house and have been informed our foundation was done incorrectly. The ground was dug for 9 ft basement walls but concrete was actually done for 8 ft. Builder wants to add 1 foot to top of foundation as it is now not high enough. However, I'm uncertain I want to do that. I'm concerned about the stability of the house with this fix and our future for resale if this is noticed by potential buyers, and I"m not happy with the idea of being the one who has to compromise for someone else's mistake when we've just barely started. Of course, I accept that no house is perfect, but I wanted this of all things done correctly.

What would you ask for--would you be okay with this fix or would you want them to tear it all out and start over and do the walls for the 9 ft hole they put in? No framing has happened yet.
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Old 06-21-2012, 05:14 PM
 
Location: The Triad (NC)
26,871 posts, read 57,924,091 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blueviolets View Post
We're building a house and have been informed our foundation was done incorrectly.
The ground was dug for 9 ft basement walls but concrete was actually done for 8 ft.
Live with an 8 foot ceiling.

Quote:
What would you ask for...
A cash reduction equal to the remedy work is reasonable.
But I would NEVER agree to the redigging.
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Old 06-21-2012, 05:18 PM
 
3 posts, read 8,221 times
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Foundation is not high enough out of the ground with only 8 feet. Drainage will be a problem and city inspector won't pass it like that according to what I've been told. Either tear out concrete and redo with 9 foot wall or add the foot of concrete on top of foundation walls are the options as I understand them.
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Old 06-21-2012, 05:23 PM
 
Location: Tempe, Arizona
4,511 posts, read 11,561,956 times
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It probably depends on how they add the extra foot to insure there are no structural issues. Do you have a structural engineer that can review and advise you?
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Old 06-21-2012, 05:39 PM
 
Location: Dallas/Ft. Worth, TX
1,856 posts, read 5,678,475 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rjrcm View Post
It probably depends on how they add the extra foot to insure there are no structural issues. Do you have a structural engineer that can review and advise you?
EXACTLY!! Any modifications at this point should be designed and signed off by a Professional Engineer! There are many ways to skin a cat and plenty of those are wrong! Let the Engineer design the correction and bless it.
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Old 06-21-2012, 08:27 PM
 
Location: Cary, NC
31,621 posts, read 55,349,802 times
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+1 for an addition to the top of the wall that is designed and inspected by a structural engineer. And the builder to pay the engineering fees, of course.
At that, I would not worry about resale.
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Old 06-22-2012, 06:17 AM
 
2,393 posts, read 4,864,890 times
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>Builder wants to add 1 foot to top of foundation

In large concrete buildings it is common to pour the walls in sections. HOWEVER reinforcing rods protrude from the top of the partial wall (because they planned it that way). Maybe the top of the wall is also roughened rather than smooth.

I would say no to an added wall section.
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Old 06-22-2012, 09:41 AM
 
Location: Morrisville, NC
7,702 posts, read 10,079,363 times
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There is absolutely no reason you can't add to the walls and it be as strong as it needs to be. With modern adhesives and techniques you can put rebar dowels in to the existing concrete that will break the concrete rather than just pull out. I would have no hesitation living in a house that has been done on and I'm a commercial construction manager. what other options are ther, tear it all out? That will cost the contractor in the five figures, will just make them mad and is not needed. Better to have this in your back pocket to remind him later how you allowed him to save some money when something else comes up.

I also don't see a problem with the house being a bit higher than planned. In fact, the higher the sill off the ground the better IMO. At least in my neighborhood ther are variations in foundation height due to the individual property and the specific crew that did the house, so they are not all the same anyway. If your area is totally flat and consistent I still doubt anyone would have an issue down the road. Once any foundation plantings grow a couple of years you won't even notice and it will probably make the house seem larger anyway.
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Old 06-22-2012, 10:54 AM
 
Location: Lexington, SC
4,281 posts, read 10,294,366 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sherifftruman View Post
There is absolutely no reason you can't add to the walls and it be as strong as it needs to be. With modern adhesives and techniques you can put rebar dowels in to the existing concrete that will break the concrete rather than just pull out. I would have no hesitation living in a house that has been done on and I'm a commercial construction manager. what other options are ther, tear it all out? That will cost the contractor in the five figures, will just make them mad and is not needed. Better to have this in your back pocket to remind him later how you allowed him to save some money when something else comes up.

I also don't see a problem with the house being a bit higher than planned. In fact, the higher the sill off the ground the better IMO. At least in my neighborhood ther are variations in foundation height due to the individual property and the specific crew that did the house, so they are not all the same anyway. If your area is totally flat and consistent I still doubt anyone would have an issue down the road. Once any foundation plantings grow a couple of years you won't even notice and it will probably make the house seem larger anyway.
I agree with what Sheriff has said. I would want some assurance as to how it was to be done so I would call in a structual engineer to dictate/plan how it will be done properly and oversee the contractor doing it as such. I would also expect the contractor who messed up to pay for the engineer.
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