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Old 06-28-2012, 09:43 AM
 
Location: Chicagoland
1,542 posts, read 1,453,974 times
Reputation: 1386

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Some good insights, thanks. Hopefully my hopes/expectations aren't far off track...
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Old 06-28-2012, 10:08 AM
 
Location: Beautiful Rhode Island
6,320 posts, read 10,502,724 times
Reputation: 6131
I think the question you need to ask yourself is that if you are an educated buyer, why do you need a realtor at all?

HGTV is about the worst place you could to get educated to buy a house.
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Old 06-28-2012, 01:38 PM
 
11 posts, read 15,037 times
Reputation: 29
I would consider myself a highly educated buyer, with very reasonable expectations, pre-approved, all my ducks in a row and such (I do NOT watch HGTV), it's just a very volatile market, back and forth kinda thing. I use agents (usually) because I don't have the time to "gopher" myself around making stupid calls and passing docs from this person to that person.

However, like I am fond of telling the dippy cashier who just can't ring my order correctly, or the mouthy assistant manager at McDonalds who can't comprehend why my food should be warm...

I am PAYING to be here, and you are PAID to be here. Guess who listens to whom? I was actually angered by people thinking that an agent shouldn't do exactly what they are told to do. Last time I checked, they get paid pretty well NOT to tell you what they want from YOU.

Sorry agents, it IS the nature of the beast. You are salespeople. A car salesman DOES NOT tell me what I want in a car, and definitely DOES NOT tell me I have to EARN their time to sell to me. That is disgusting and ridiculous. And considering most of the agents around here are the "2 weeks at Hondros and I have a license" type, after I spent YEARS in training and in the industry (I am not elaborating), it's a downright insult.
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Old 06-28-2012, 02:33 PM
 
11 posts, read 15,037 times
Reputation: 29
Apologies if it was so difficult to determine that the post was my opinion (not stirring the pot-gratuitously? did you actually use the word "gratuitously"?-like, "with gratuity"?????-lol...well, you did also use the word "dreck") , that I am "allowed" to have my opinion and voice it as well, and that if you don't like it, nor agree with it, it just shows unprofessionalism on YOUR part to insult me because you don't like my opinion. Wah, wah, wah...

By the way, what WOULD a "key jockey" (great term for a fellow professional agent, huh? So which of your peers have you been calling "key jockey" behind their backs? Hell, I don't even marginalize your industry as much as YOU just did) reap if they worked for me? Just curious. It seems you have little respect for your fellow agents, you certainly have little respect for me, and I'm a BUYER.

You remind me of a broker I know, who would jab at his own office agents, saying, "They're all used house salesmen. I'm the guy who owns the showroom."
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Old 06-28-2012, 02:57 PM
 
62 posts, read 161,249 times
Reputation: 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pokemom
car salesman DOES NOT tell me what I want in a car, and definitely DOES NOT tell me I have to EARN their time to sell to me.
I will say that I've found real estate agents to be quite a bit different than other people working in other services. They have their own, I wanna say, etiquette or unwritten rules. Not saying anything against the ones on this forum. You've all been wonderful and helpful. But the ones I've dealt with? Well, it's been an eye-opening experience. And not one I hope to repeat anytime soon.
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Old 06-28-2012, 03:48 PM
 
Location: Chicagoland
1,542 posts, read 1,453,974 times
Reputation: 1386
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hollytree View Post
I think the question you need to ask yourself is that if you are an educated buyer, why do you need a realtor at all?

HGTV is about the worst place you could to get educated to buy a house.
While I think I'm knowledgeable and well prepared, unless I have a house built I wouldn't buy without a realtor, especially since we'll be relocating to another state we don't know that much about. Still debating using a realtor if we build.

OP
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Old 06-28-2012, 03:59 PM
 
Location: Boise, ID
8,013 posts, read 22,585,509 times
Reputation: 9235
Yes, any agent can tell you what you want to hear. The best agents tell you what you need to hear.

To the OP, I agree with what others have said. A buyer who knows what they want (and what they don't want, which is just as important) and is realistic and knowledgeable on what they can actually get (including having financing lined up) is a blessing.

If you know the details, I would give the agent lists of:
Must haves
Would likes
Must NOT haves

Also a buyer who is willing to listen if they are told that there isn't much (or any) inventory matching their criteria, and they either have to be patient, or widen their scope. And a buyer who is capable of acting quickly when the right house does come along, and not dilly dally and then get angry when someone else beats them to it.
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Old 06-28-2012, 05:13 PM
 
Location: Salem, OR
13,753 posts, read 31,638,789 times
Reputation: 12126
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hollytree View Post
I think the question you need to ask yourself is that if you are an educated buyer, why do you need a realtor at all?

HGTV is about the worst place you could to get educated to buy a house.
Well most people want a real estate agent these days to help them with the nuances of area homes. Why did this home sell for more than that home. Funky floor plans, etc you can't get educated about from online pictures. Any decent agent knows about the reputations of the local builders, etc. The nature of the real estate professional has shifted. Some agents have easily shifted with the consumers changing demands and do well. Those that are stuck in the old ways ie "the key jockeys" whose sole purpose is to act as door openers, aren't long for the world.
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Old 06-28-2012, 05:37 PM
 
Location: Salem, OR
13,753 posts, read 31,638,789 times
Reputation: 12126
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pokemom View Post
I would consider myself a highly educated buyer, with very reasonable expectations, pre-approved, all my ducks in a row and such (I do NOT watch HGTV), it's just a very volatile market, back and forth kinda thing. I use agents (usually) because I don't have the time to "gopher" myself around making stupid calls and passing docs from this person to that person.

However, like I am fond of telling the dippy cashier who just can't ring my order correctly, or the mouthy assistant manager at McDonalds who can't comprehend why my food should be warm...

I am PAYING to be here, and you are PAID to be here. Guess who listens to whom? I was actually angered by people thinking that an agent shouldn't do exactly what they are told to do. Last time I checked, they get paid pretty well NOT to tell you what they want from YOU.

Sorry agents, it IS the nature of the beast. You are salespeople. A car salesman DOES NOT tell me what I want in a car, and definitely DOES NOT tell me I have to EARN their time to sell to me. That is disgusting and ridiculous. And considering most of the agents around here are the "2 weeks at Hondros and I have a license" type, after I spent YEARS in training and in the industry (I am not elaborating), it's a downright insult.

Not sure you realize how abrasive your post is. If you wanted to work with a good agent and displayed the attitude in your post, they'd just turn you down as a client. It isn't about not wanting to provide a good customer service experience because good agents care about that. Your post comes across as looking for a doormat. Good agents have enough business that they don't have to be doormats. All that happens is that you would be hard to work with and people making good money don't have to deal with it. The odd thing about wanting to treat people like they are your servants is that you end up with the worst of the worst because they are desperate for money, and then have a really bad experience which reinforces the negative perception. Then the cycle begins again that agents are idiots.

If you are pre-approved and reasonable then it isn't an issue, but your post isn't congruent with that statement.
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Old 06-28-2012, 05:52 PM
 
Location: Cary, NC
31,676 posts, read 55,479,016 times
Reputation: 30232
Quote:
Originally Posted by Midpack View Post
I had two specific questions, but thought maybe I should just open it up broader and ask. So within reason, what do experienced realtors hope for in a client (short of looking at one house and offering asking price - jk)?





My specific questions FWIW:
  • Having relocated and bought four homes, we know what we like. We have a 3 page list of what we like and don't like, though there are about a half dozen desires (identified) that are show stoppers. The list is mostly for us to make sure we've thought of everything (is there an abandoned superfund site next door, flood plain, etc.) - we fully realize there's no chance we'd ever find a home that meets all our desires, or even close, unless we build from scratch. What do realtors want in terms of buyers needs: give me the 3 page list OR give me your top 3-5 show stoppers (and don't bother with all the rest)?
  • I like to research purchases, that would certainly include a house. I don't expect a broker to do it all for me or hold my hand, I'm more than willing to spend the time on my own. So I'd want to see (on paper, not in person) all the listings, and maybe recommend a few to view, before making a purchase. That does not mean I want to look at houses for 6 months. When I've bought homes in the past I don't remember looking at more than 10-12 before making a successful offer. The last thing I'd want would be a broker who screened everything for us without showing us listings to view on our own. Are realtors OK with letting me see (on paper) anything I want to consider?
I assume one of the biggest issues for brokers is buyers who want a $500K house for $250K and take forever coming to the realization it ain't gonna happen. After several home purchases, we understand comps/market value so hopefully we're more realistic than some buyers (you see totally unrealistic buyers on HGTV all the time if that's to be believed). The other thing we see on HGTV is buyers who faced with something they don't like, can't seem to differentiate between what can be easily changed (paint colors, cabinet hardware, etc.) and what can't (or would be very expensive).
No kidding, but if you were to look at one house and buy it, I would be more nervous than gratified. Just too much opportunity for buyers remorse. I would rather show more homes so you were sure about the one.

Of course, the fundamentals have to be in place. Financial credibility being a reasonable expectation.
However, to beg the question, there is no "ideal buyer." Everyone is unique, with various overlaps in personal tendencies, needs, and personalities.

Mutual respect and good two-way communication are important and can take a broker and buyer a long way together as they learn about each other.
Buyers who respect my time, effort, and knowledge, and listen to answers to their questions are a pleasure to work with.
If there is little urgency to buy, less urgency to shop is a reasonable expectation.

Your 3 page list has to be honored as best as possible. Your dealbreakers are more important, because your 3 page list is going to be compromised and adjusted, but the powerlines, busy streets, RR tracks, etc are still going to be dealbreakers.
Regardless, the house has to work for you, and that often is the culmination of enough variables that the reason for the final choice becomes somewhat intangible for many buyers.

The $250,000 budget and $500,000 expectation is not all that common, but easily educated past.
The $250,000 budget and $300,000 expectation is much more common, more difficult to educate past, and can waste everyone's time when properties meet the need, but out of reach.

So, basically, ideally, qualification, motivation, and respect make for a good experience with a buyer.
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