U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Real Estate
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-01-2012, 03:34 PM
 
4,635 posts, read 7,266,413 times
Reputation: 4759

Advertisements

The fact that the owners have not seen fit to even remediate the basics, tells me they don't have the money to fix anything.

So they need to drop the price of the house significantly. A handyman special.

However, unless you are doing a cash sale, I wonder what your lender would have to say about the house. Do you have the cash for all the work that needs to be done... and possibly more?

It screams cheap and shoddy construction. Heck, my kitchen cabinets are 40 years old!! This house was a college rental when I bought it. Not one cabinet damaged. It's also 110 years old and I have a better foundation than the house you are considering.

Run, don't walk.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-02-2012, 09:19 AM
 
46 posts, read 80,577 times
Reputation: 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by ocngypz View Post
The fact that the owners have not seen fit to even remediate the basics, tells me they don't have the money to fix anything.
The owner's are quite rich (physicians) and they have paid off the mortgage. I think they just put in the time to maintain it properly.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-02-2012, 09:36 AM
 
Location: Brentwood, Tennessee
39,554 posts, read 38,186,007 times
Reputation: 74655
Now you are bringing emotion into the deal.

It does not matter if the owner is Donald Trump or what you think the owners "should" do.

You make what you think is a fair offer based on the condition of the house and its comps. Playing games is not the way to go. If they were willing to put on a new roof, they most likely would have done so before listing it.

If you think it needs a new roof, you should have made a lower offer to take that into account, and then paid for a new roof through your loan.

You need to start over and get a better agent who can advise you on stuff like this along the way.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-02-2012, 01:50 PM
 
46 posts, read 80,577 times
Reputation: 25
Good advice! Yea, we should keep our emotions out of the deal, but its hard . We have been on the market for sometime now, and we hope to wrap this up before the end of summer. If it doesn't work, we'll probably continue to rent.

Most seem to suggest that we should walk away, but I still feel the house would be in pretty good shape if the main items are fixed.

I'm about to give the sellers our wish list. One question: I have four main 1000+$ items to ask. And then there are a bunch of 100+ dollar items (e.g., broken cabinets, leaky valves, missing garage opener, etc.) that if you add it all up would probably come to about 1000$. Question is, should I bother bringing all of these issues up in my first request, or quote one single price for all small items (say 500$?), or just leave them out of our wish list? I would like 100+ items fixed either by sellers or by us, but I don't want to jeopardize the deal because of bringing them up. But on the other hand, in negotiations, your first offer should not be your best offer, so I'm like
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-02-2012, 02:37 PM
 
Location: Brentwood, Tennessee
39,554 posts, read 38,186,007 times
Reputation: 74655
Quote:
Originally Posted by proton022 View Post
in negotiations, your first offer should not be your best offer, so I'm like
You are at a different stage in negotiations. At this point you need to itemize the things you want repaired. Do not try to come back later with "additional" items.

If you are not careful with your "wish list," you risk having the seller reject your offer. Many new homebuyers have completely unrealistic expectations. An inspectors' report is not like a shopping list of things you give back to the seller to provide you. You review the items, see if there are any dealbreakers (different for everyone), then choose the things you think should be repaired. Some things the seller can take care of, but some things you live with and fix yourself over time. Asking for 100 items is way too much, IMHO.

I think you need to be asking different questions, like "What is causing the buckling in the driveway?" Then you will know if it is truly something that can be fixed or if it's a symptom of a much more difficult, costly problem. I wish you had a photo of the driveway so we could see how bad it is or if it just is not a "perfect" driveway.

It is very difficult to keep emotions out of a deal like this but it happens on both sides of the table. Your wants and the sellers' wants are VERY different.

My advice is to offer a price you think is fair, perhaps not your lowest offer, along with a list of the things you really want fixed. Everyone would like a new roof, but I seriously doubt you are going to get that in this situation. I think it's risky to come back at a seller with a list of repairs in the thousands, plus other "nickel and dime" stuff.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-02-2012, 03:03 PM
 
46 posts, read 80,577 times
Reputation: 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wmsn4Life View Post
Asking for 100 items is way too much, IMHO.
Oh, I didn't mean 100 items . I meant few items that will take a few hundred dollars to fix each. I was planning club those relatively small items all in one bucket and ask for one lumpsum credit.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wmsn4Life View Post
I think you need to be asking different questions, like "What is causing the buckling in the driveway?" Then you will know if it is truly something that can be fixed or if it's a symptom of a much more difficult, costly problem. I wish you had a photo of the driveway so we could see how bad it is or if it just is not a "perfect" driveway.
I'm attaching pictures. All your feedback has been quite useful. Thanks!
Attached Thumbnails
what to ask after inspection-p1020529.jpg   what to ask after inspection-p1020530.jpg   what to ask after inspection-p1020531.jpg  
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-02-2012, 03:14 PM
 
Location: Lexington, SC
4,281 posts, read 10,346,058 times
Reputation: 3700
As a seller I would not make any repairs that can be subjective. Such as, I do not like the color of the new shingles as they look different once up there, the new concrete does not match the old in color or texture, different hinges on some of the cabinet doors, new doorknobs do not match other older ones in the house, paint is a different shade, etc. I would decrease price and put the ball back in the buyers court, but I would not make repairs.

Now in my last sale we did agree I would have two trees removed but this was not subjective. I agreed to trees down and removed, stumps ground down, ground left level, and no sodding. Within 48 hours of us agreeing, was all done. Again, nothing subjective.

Last edited by accufitgolf; 08-02-2012 at 03:46 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-02-2012, 03:37 PM
 
Location: Florida Gulf Coast
4,112 posts, read 5,547,429 times
Reputation: 6445
Quote:
Originally Posted by proton022 View Post
The owner's are quite rich (physicians) and they have paid off the mortgage. I think they just put in the time to maintain it properly.
I know you've already heard this, but I, too, would walk/run away from this house. Everything you've written sounds like the house was built cheaply, and the owners did not maintain the house properly. If they did not care enough to clean and stage the home properly, what does that tell you? No, the concrete cracks and upheaval are not acceptable in a home this new. No, the rooof should not have to be "immediately" replaced or even in the near future. Broken cabinets? No. Non-working disposal? No. Did they live in this place or just rent it out? Anyway, it's your money but if I'm buying a house built in 2000, I surely wouldn't expect all those problems. And who knows what else is lurking due to non-maintenance or neglect of the owners? Regardless, I would not WANT them to replace anything, as clearly they'd do it on the cheap.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-02-2012, 03:38 PM
 
Location: Brentwood, Tennessee
39,554 posts, read 38,186,007 times
Reputation: 74655
Quote:
Originally Posted by proton022 View Post
Oh, I didn't mean 100 items .
Thank God! I was worried for a minute.

The photos do help. To me, the driveway is no big deal. I was picturing this:

USGS Multimedia Gallery: Buckled Sidewalk

I guess it all depends on your definition of "acceptable."

I'm glad you think my advice has been helpful. I'm certainly not a pro, but I've been a buyer and a seller multiple times, so I know what it feels like to get realistic and unrealistic offers.

I'll wait for others add their thoughts as well.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-02-2012, 05:04 PM
 
Location: Mokelumne Hill, CA & El Pescadero, BCS MX.
6,958 posts, read 18,616,647 times
Reputation: 6366
A contractor friend of mine says this about concrete;

1. It's heavy.
2 It will crack.
3 Nobody will steal it.

Your description made me picture in my mind a 1 or 2 inch difference in height between the slabs. That doesn't look as serious as I pictured it.

Little things like a missing garage door opener seem not worth the price of negotiating, but everyone is different.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Real Estate
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top