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Old 10-13-2007, 08:13 AM
 
3,913 posts, read 9,985,366 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beowulf7 View Post
Last fall, I placed an offer on a brand new house and it was accepted by the builder. So I hired a home inspector and had the property checked out. Several minor issues were found, but nothing major. The house came with a 1-year "bumper to bumper" warranty as most if not all new homes do.

Fast forward almost 10+ months and my warranty is about to expire. Is it worthwhile to have my home reinspected, in case he finds any new issues that didn't manifest themselves during the first inspection? Or would that just be a waste of money? Over the past 10+ months, I found several minor things that the home builder fixed. Now, everything looks good, but I'd like advice from those who were in a similar position as I am. Thanks!

BTW, I'm also getting some junk mail from various home inspectors who know my home warranty is about to expire, so that is making me a little more paranoid than I should be.
I'm sitting here shaking... I don't know the licensing requirements in Texas, but I would not recommend you hire the same inspector. He/she will miss the same things from the previous inspections. In Florida, anyone with an occupational license can call themselves a home inspector and there's no protection for the consumer. At a minimum, make sure your inspector is a member of AASHI which requires passing a lengthy test. It's even better, if they have a contractor license...they know where builders shortcut homeowners (less nails in roof shingles, minimum building grade materials, etc.). Your inspector may already meet these requirements, but you didn't say so. If you spend the money and they don't find a thing, you at least have peace of mind going forward. If they find inherent weaknesses, the builder will have to correct them.

It also concerns me you only got a 1 year warranty. I remember horror stories of the mold, sagging roof trusses and more from the flood period. The fact that you had a leak in the flashing in under one year is suspect IMO. In Florida, a builder's 2-10 warranty is pretty standard. Ask your builder if the warranty is transferrable (probably not) and I would suggest at a minimum that you either renew it or buy a new one. You may also read homeowner comments about builders at Homeowners Against Deficient Dwellings; HomeOwners for Better Building - Home; and Ripoff Report: By Consumers, For Consumers

Good luck and let us know how it goes!
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Old 10-13-2007, 10:34 AM
 
Location: TX
5,412 posts, read 13,931,924 times
Reputation: 1699
Quote:
Originally Posted by shellytc View Post
boewulf7, it can't hurt to have the inspection. the worst is that you will have spent a couple of hundred dollars for peace of mind. On another note, where the flashing meets the brick, take a hose to that spot and spray it very hard to see if any water penetrates. It is the only way to know without that huge rain.

Shelly
Shelly, thanks for the input. Yes, I've thought about spraying water w/ a garden hose to the new flashed area and see if any water is still getting into my house. I'll do it this weekend when I get a chance. I'm now leaning more toward getting another home inspection, but just need to budget for it right. I was very abusive to my credit card last month and have a hefty payment to make this month.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jimj View Post
You might want to ask your neighbors what they've seen wrong with their houses up to this point, or if any have done the final inspection yet and what was found. Since y'all have the same builder it would give you ideas of what to look for.
There are 2 builders in my dev., but yes, I'll ask a couple of my neighbors that I'm friends with (both homes are made by the other builder) what they plan to do re: another home inspection.

I wonder how many new home buyers getting a second home inspection. Heck, I bet there are many who don't even get the initial one, thinking that they'll just rely on the 1-yr. warr.
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Old 10-13-2007, 10:45 AM
 
Location: TX
5,412 posts, read 13,931,924 times
Reputation: 1699
Quote:
Originally Posted by TampaKaren View Post
I'm sitting here shaking... I don't know the licensing requirements in Texas, but I would not recommend you hire the same inspector. He/she will miss the same things from the previous inspections. In Florida, anyone with an occupational license can call themselves a home inspector and there's no protection for the consumer. At a minimum, make sure your inspector is a member of AASHI which requires passing a lengthy test. It's even better, if they have a contractor license...they know where builders shortcut homeowners (less nails in roof shingles, minimum building grade materials, etc.). Your inspector may already meet these requirements, but you didn't say so. If you spend the money and they don't find a thing, you at least have peace of mind going forward. If they find inherent weaknesses, the builder will have to correct them.

It also concerns me you only got a 1 year warranty. I remember horror stories of the mold, sagging roof trusses and more from the flood period. The fact that you had a leak in the flashing in under one year is suspect IMO. In Florida, a builder's 2-10 warranty is pretty standard. Ask your builder if the warranty is transferrable (probably not) and I would suggest at a minimum that you either renew it or buy a new one. You may also read homeowner comments about builders at Homeowners Against Deficient Dwellings; HomeOwners for Better Building - Home; and Ripoff Report: By Consumers, For Consumers

Good luck and let us know how it goes!
Thanks for chiming in, TampaKaren. You make some good points and I will clarify. I just checked my home inspector's Web site. He listed the following qualifications (I x'ed out the actual license # so that I don't seem like I'm promoting him):

Quote:
NACHI CERTIFIED #xxxxxx - National Association of Certified Home Inspectors is the world's largest most elite home inspection association in the world. Annual Inspector testing and continued education is a prerequisite.

TEXAS HI LICENSE #xxxxxx - I currently meet all State approved Home Inspector educational requirements and qualifications. I'm fully approved by the Texas Real Estate Commission.
I don't know if NACHI is like AASHI.

About the 1-yr. warranty, that covers "bumper to bumper", such as electrical, HVAC, appliances, plumbing, etc. My builder also provides a 10-yr. power train warranty, which covers the siding and foundation. Sorry for the car analogies in my mention of the warranties, I'm a bit of a car guy.

I was also concerned about the leak that was in the flashing and hope there are no long-term effects. I don't see any discoloration of the paint around the window frame. Basically, what happened was when it rained extremely hard (which I noticed about 3-4 times this year), some drops of water would run down the window and collect on the window sill. It wasn't condensation. The builder couldn't find any obvious problem w/ it, but he called his roofer contractor to reflash that area. The problem wasn't w/ the window either b/c the window contractor took a garden hose and sprayed the heck out of it, but no water entered the other side of the window. We haven't gotten any heavy rains in a while, so I'll to the garden hose thing as shellytc suggested just to make sure the extra flashing does the trick.
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Old 10-13-2007, 11:43 AM
 
3,913 posts, read 9,985,366 times
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Beowulf7,

Sorry about being a drama queen. ASHI and NACHI are both trade associations and it sounds like your inspector is reputable. Unlike Texas, Florida has no licencing requirements for home inspectors which always causes me to be leery. It's good to know you have licensed inspectors.

I've also seen my share of shoddy workmanship. You are addressing the issues within the timeframe and it sounds to me like it's going to work out for you.

Karen.
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Old 10-13-2007, 01:46 PM
 
Location: In an alternate universe according to some, AKA Aspergers
22,096 posts, read 20,981,377 times
Reputation: 15049
Beo, when outside look at the window sill, take a flat screwdriver or knife and prod around the corners of the sill and up the sides of the frame from there to see if any of the wood is soft. Had a brick front house and these went rotten on me. Had to replace 4 of them.
Look for any bulging, cracking paint which usually is a sign of rot starting. I also always check where the wood ends on the door frame outside the house. Usually it's just off the concrete or barely touching. These rot real quick if not draining well.
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Old 10-14-2007, 11:15 PM
 
Location: TX
5,412 posts, read 13,931,924 times
Reputation: 1699
Quote:
Originally Posted by TampaKaren View Post
Beowulf7,

Sorry about being a drama queen. ASHI and NACHI are both trade associations and it sounds like your inspector is reputable. Unlike Texas, Florida has no licencing requirements for home inspectors which always causes me to be leery. It's good to know you have licensed inspectors.

I've also seen my share of shoddy workmanship. You are addressing the issues within the timeframe and it sounds to me like it's going to work out for you.

Karen.
Hi Karen, I appreciate your concern and didn't interpret it as you acting as a drama queen. LOL Yes, I remember when phone interviewing various home inspectors last year, I asked about their certifications. I'll contact my home inspector to see what his schedule is like later this month or early Nov.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jimj View Post
Beo, when outside look at the window sill, take a flat screwdriver or knife and prod around the corners of the sill and up the sides of the frame from there to see if any of the wood is soft. Had a brick front house and these went rotten on me. Had to replace 4 of them.
Look for any bulging, cracking paint which usually is a sign of rot starting. I also always check where the wood ends on the door frame outside the house. Usually it's just off the concrete or barely touching. These rot real quick if not draining well.
Thanks for the tips, Jim. We're finally getting some rain right now and it should be heavy later tonight. So I'll def. look for a pool of water on the window sill if the flashing didn't fix that small leak. I'll also do the screwdriver thing you mentioned to look for rotting wood.
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Old 11-06-2007, 01:32 PM
 
Location: TX
5,412 posts, read 13,931,924 times
Reputation: 1699
I just wanted to follow up that I had a 2nd home inspection (by the same home inspector) a few days ago. He found a few issues, but nowhere as many as he found the 1st time (obviously). I'm now going to submit the warranty request to my home builder. Thanks again for everyone's input.
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Old 11-06-2007, 04:19 PM
 
Location: Houston
19 posts, read 52,021 times
Reputation: 11
Yes it is smart to have a warrenty inspection. They happen quite frequently in the 11th month.
A good inspector will work with you to document all the things you found problematic in your new house but also items that you probably do not know as problems at the time.
They all should be properly reported and then given to the builder for repair.
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Old 11-06-2007, 11:35 PM
 
Location: Columbia, SC
8,803 posts, read 17,218,588 times
Reputation: 6111
I would recommend getting another home inspection. Think of it as a $250 insurance policy. For the record, I'm an agent and I do follow my own advice. I've bought 2 new construction homes, had them inspected at beginning of 11th month, then turned in the home inspection and asked them to fix everything on it. Nothing major on mine, but I did have a client with a bow on a support beam that the inspector caught that could have led to problems in the future. Would have been an easy thing to overlook during construction.
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Old 11-07-2007, 07:52 AM
 
Location: TX
5,412 posts, read 13,931,924 times
Reputation: 1699
Quote:
Originally Posted by Diligent View Post
Yes it is smart to have a warrenty inspection. They happen quite frequently in the 11th month.
A good inspector will work with you to document all the things you found problematic in your new house but also items that you probably do not know as problems at the time.
They all should be properly reported and then given to the builder for repair.
Yes, he (the home inspector) furnished a fairly thorough report, similar in style to the one he did about a year ago, which I can provide to the home builder upon request. I went to DR Horton's Web site and filled out the warranty request and await their reply.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brandon Hoffman View Post
I would recommend getting another home inspection. Think of it as a $250 insurance policy. For the record, I'm an agent and I do follow my own advice. I've bought 2 new construction homes, had them inspected at beginning of 11th month, then turned in the home inspection and asked them to fix everything on it. Nothing major on mine, but I did have a client with a bow on a support beam that the inspector caught that could have led to problems in the future. Would have been an easy thing to overlook during construction.
I appreciate the input. Yes, I had a 2nd home inspection done (by the same person). It gives me peace of mind. Also, the home inspector found a few issues (thankfully nothing major) that I didn't already know about.
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