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Old 11-17-2012, 09:28 AM
 
Location: BC, Arizona
1,170 posts, read 705,673 times
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It would make a big difference to me whether a house fronted a busy street or backed on to it. If the backyard faces the busy street, and the other "quieter" house has two or three neighbors abutting the backyard (meaning you could hear them and their dogs/kids in their yards) I'd go for traffic every time.
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Old 11-17-2012, 10:09 AM
 
Location: Blue Ridge Mntns., NC
9,536 posts, read 13,181,519 times
Reputation: 7686
Quote:
Originally Posted by snooper View Post
I was looking at two identical houses to buy. Both were about the same price. One was on a very busy road that had hundreds of cars and trucks drive by every hour. The other was four blocks away on a dead end street with only 8 houses with basically no traffic.

Why would anyone buy a house on a loud busy street when the exact same house is available 4 blocks away on a very quiet dead end street? Should there be a price difference? How much? Would you buy a house on a VERY busy street?

Noooo.... I would not even l@@k at a house on a VERY busy street. The one four blocks away on a dead end is a no brainer. You cannot put a price on living on a quiet street listening to nature vs. hearing traffic, noise, sirens, horns, road grit in your house, etc.
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Old 11-17-2012, 01:56 PM
 
2,165 posts, read 4,506,197 times
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> You cannot put a price on living on a quiet street listening to nature vs. hearing traffic, noise, sirens, horns, road grit in your house, etc.

The fact is you CAN put a price on it because eventually this house will sell.
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Old 11-17-2012, 02:15 PM
 
Location: NC
5,800 posts, read 6,331,863 times
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Some advantages to the right buyer might be: snow plowing (good if you are a medical staff), no young children driving noisy toy cars up and down the street in front of the house, and proximity to public transportation. It's also good if you want to have a yard sale.

Also, some people are not sensitive to traffic noise and some do not have young children or pets. It might take longer to find a buyer, but the house could sell for the same amount as others deep in the subdivision.
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Old 11-17-2012, 02:58 PM
 
12,978 posts, read 11,582,250 times
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I know a couple of good examples.

We have a section line road mostly developed when it was a quiet country road. Then they made it into a major north south arterial. The houses most exposed took a bath in the 20 to 25% range. Those lesser exposed took a 10% range. The ones whose exposure was only over the backyard wall took little - maybe 2 or 3% but so small be hard to separate from normal variability.

Have another example in a senior citizen community. There the house front to a reasonably busy street (for a senior community) and back to a major arterial. Hit is between 15 and 20%. Even on the good side of the street (which back to a golf course) you get nailed 10%.

On top of that they sell slowly. Only a portion of the eligible buyers will put up with such conditions even at a substantial discount. So figure three times as long to sell even at a discount.
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Old 11-17-2012, 03:50 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
30,319 posts, read 55,118,963 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by accufitgolf View Post
I was once told to never buy a house on a road that had a line painted down the middle of it.
In some parts, even quiet residential streets have double-yellow lines. So little in life is black and white ...


Quote:
Originally Posted by gv28 View Post
There are many minuses and pluses including:

pile up of snow drifts from the snow plows
Snow plows don't come down less busy streets?
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Old 11-18-2012, 12:53 PM
 
Location: deep woods
404 posts, read 570,056 times
Reputation: 553
Default The Roy G Biv rules of real estate

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
In some parts, even quiet residential streets have double-yellow lines. So little in life is black and white ..
it can take a busy street seller so long to see the green they can start to get the blues
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Old 11-18-2012, 02:10 PM
 
Location: Kansas City North
3,445 posts, read 6,356,643 times
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MANY years ago I worked with a girl whose sister bought a house on the corner of two heavily traveled, 4 lane streets. The husband was sure there was commercial potential. It's probably been 35 years now, and it's still residential.

A poster above mentioned such a location was good for holding garage sales. Only if there's a side street very close by for parking. In the above situation, it was quite a trek from the closest side street back to her house. Her driveway was pretty short because of street widening over the years.
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Old 11-18-2012, 02:30 PM
 
12,978 posts, read 11,582,250 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Okey Dokie View Post
MANY years ago I worked with a girl whose sister bought a house on the corner of two heavily traveled, 4 lane streets. The husband was sure there was commercial potential. It's probably been 35 years now, and it's still residential.

A poster above mentioned such a location was good for holding garage sales. Only if there's a side street very close by for parking. In the above situation, it was quite a trek from the closest side street back to her house. Her driveway was pretty short because of street widening over the years.
Yup - There are a large set of such lots in suburban Las Vegas where the owner has been holding out for years on the basis that a section/section crossing can be zoned commercial. It was possible, in fact relatively easy, some years back...but then the neighbors got in the act and basically got the possibility banned. Still they sit vacant...the problem is they are terrible for residential use but that is the only use possible.
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