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Old 08-05-2013, 10:18 AM
 
Location: Cary, NC
30,537 posts, read 53,501,794 times
Reputation: 28824

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We tend to use the email system provided by Centralized Showings.
When representing buyers, it is clearly my job to in no way compromise them, even if they only seem lukewarm on the house. That definitely includes feedback requests.

So, I don't usually answer questions on pricing, unless the house is sorely overpriced.
And I don't give anything away.
I don't answer if it is in the buyers' Top 3. I don't answer if they are ready to buy in a week or month, etc. I don't answer if they have a home to sell. None of these questions are feedback on the property. They are attempts at intrusions into my clients' private information.

If the clients have interest, I will ask a leading question, to indicate as much. It is funny how often I ask a "buying question" in the feedback and don't get any response from the listing agent.
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Old 08-05-2013, 10:48 AM
 
1,667 posts, read 2,167,796 times
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I see no advantage from the buyers perspective in leaving feeeback. Every showing I do gets an email request for feedback.

Answering any of the questions if you are still interested in the house gives away some of the buyers leverage...the sellers don't know what the buyer is thinking until an offer comes in, and that is how it should be. Realtors giving other realtors feedback on a house that there is still some interest in is just a bad idea...its making it look like were in cahoots...especially since the feedback is not public.
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Old 08-05-2013, 11:00 AM
 
Location: Cary, NC
30,537 posts, read 53,501,794 times
Reputation: 28824
Quote:
Originally Posted by marksmu View Post
I see no advantage from the buyers perspective in leaving feeeback. Every showing I do gets an email request for feedback.

Answering any of the questions if you are still interested in the house gives away some of the buyers leverage...the sellers don't know what the buyer is thinking until an offer comes in, and that is how it should be. Realtors giving other realtors feedback on a house that there is still some interest in is just a bad idea...its making it look like were in cahoots...especially since the feedback is not public.
I know what you mean. But we have a local culture of giving feedback, so I either try to get something from it, or make it fairly banal.

"Does the seller have a survey of the property to share?"
"Was the attic/basement finish done with permit?"
These are feedback responses that are often ignored, when they should open a conversation.

If there are deal breakers, we all use the deal breaker as feedback. Obviously, it is a known factor and that helps us not to be pinned down or give anything up.
"House is OK. Powerlines/train tracks/driveway/whatever are not."

I dislike when reasonable feedback is interpreted as a sales objection that MUST be overcome by the listing agent, in whatever mindless ploy they offer. Some are really pushy.

My favorite was:
"Buyers like some things, but the noise from the road was just too much for them."
Listing agent (who had it on the market for a year by then):
"Sellers have never had a problem with the noise as long as they have lived there."

Last edited by MikeJaquish; 08-05-2013 at 11:15 AM..
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Old 08-05-2013, 11:58 AM
 
2,208 posts, read 3,110,046 times
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Thanks for the feedback to my question. :-)

Talking about giving away leverage, I had a realtor in the past that listed my home as motivated to sell. To me that made it sound like I'd take a low ball offer. She made it sound like I was desperate when I wasn't.

Even if I were desperate, I'd never let my realtor know. That right there means I'd be getting low offers. Why does anyone need to know my reason for selling? They don't. That's my business and has nothing to do with the sell of my house. I don't need that slipping out when my Realtor is speaking with a potential buyer's Realtor.

I know the one offer I had on my house, the buyer was closing on their home and needed a house really quick because they didn't want to move twice. They didn't want to move into a rental and then move into their new home so they were anxious to find something. I feel for them but I'm surely not going to take a low ball offer just so they won't have to move twice. They are still asking my Realtor if I've given their offer any more thought.
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Old 08-05-2013, 12:16 PM
 
Location: San Francisco
2,279 posts, read 3,611,107 times
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While I'm not a realtor... I've been a buyer (and seller) several times in the past.

And I'm going to confess that there have been times when, as a buyer, my visceral response to a house was not something my agent could have shared with the seller's agent... at least not in a polite manner.

To be honest, other than something like "overpriced" or if concerns are raised about something easily remedied (cleanliness, bushes that need trimming), I suspect the majority of feedback is not going to be very useful. It's going to be something halfway polite like "Didn't have a 4th bedroom" or "Would prefer a gas stove". Feedback for the sake of leaving feedback.
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Old 08-05-2013, 02:39 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
38,506 posts, read 30,560,504 times
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I think the type of feedback that's appropriate can come from either the buyers (via their agent) or the other agent themselves. The sort of feedback that I think is helpful is along these lines:

"They felt the bathrooms were too small."

"They loved the floorplan but they want something move in ready."

"They liked the house but are looking for a zero lot line/larger backyard/something with room for a pool/something without a pool." (you get the drift)

"I noticed a pet odor/smoke odor in the house."

"Loved the house but wow, it seems really overpriced!"

"The minor bedrooms are too small for their needs."

"They really liked the second living area."

"That paint color in the living room really threw them for a loop."

Feedback isn't just for the sellers - it's also for the realtors. Sometimes the realtor has already brought up some concerns but the seller didn't think there was any validity to those concerns. Hearing the same concerns over and over again in the form of feedback FROM OTHER PARTIES can finally convince them to address some of the challenges of selling their home and make that job easier for everyone involved.
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Old 08-05-2013, 03:01 PM
 
Location: Cary, NC
30,537 posts, read 53,501,794 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
I think the type of feedback that's appropriate can come from either the buyers (via their agent) or the other agent themselves. The sort of feedback that I think is helpful is along these lines:

"They felt the bathrooms were too small."

"They loved the floorplan but they want something move in ready."

"They liked the house but are looking for a zero lot line/larger backyard/something with room for a pool/something without a pool." (you get the drift)

"I noticed a pet odor/smoke odor in the house."

"Loved the house but wow, it seems really overpriced!"

"The minor bedrooms are too small for their needs."

"They really liked the second living area."

"That paint color in the living room really threw them for a loop."

Feedback isn't just for the sellers - it's also for the realtors. Sometimes the realtor has already brought up some concerns but the seller didn't think there was any validity to those concerns. Hearing the same concerns over and over again in the form of feedback FROM OTHER PARTIES can finally convince them to address some of the challenges of selling their home and make that job easier for everyone involved.
But, marksmu is not wrong. Feedback can compromise the client, and helping the real estate agent is not an excuse for compromising the client.
I try to avoid any mention that the client likes the house, for example. I prefer to let the offer, or lack thereof, do the talking...
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Old 08-05-2013, 03:30 PM
 
Location: Salem, OR
13,611 posts, read 30,743,201 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by diddlydudette View Post
I'm just curious how Realtors feel about this.

What would be some reasons why you wouldn't leave feedback?
Reasons I don't leave feedback...

1) The agent calls me three weeks later to ask.
2) The agent sends me some long 10 question survey.
3) I was in a bazillion homes that day and the house had no impression other than my clients didn't like it.
4) I don't like the agent.
5) My clients might have some lingering interest and I don't want to compromise them.
6) They call me from a different line requiring me to write down their phone number as I'm out and about, rather than being able to click "call back" on my phone.
7) I'm tired and overworked.

During busy times, I can be in 50-60 homes a week. If I take 5 minutes to give feedback for each of those, I would spend 5 hours of my week just giving courtesy feedback. That's 5 hours away from my family, down time for me, or time for my clients. Feedback is a courtesy. Make it an easy 30 second thing for me with an email, and I'll do it. Make it hard for me and I don't.
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Old 08-05-2013, 03:40 PM
 
2,208 posts, read 3,110,046 times
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Thanks everyone. I now understand a little better and can see both sides to leaving feedback.

My Realtor uses Centralized Showing Service. I love it. I can be contacted via text message or phone when someone wants to view my home. All feedback and each showing is listed in one place so that I can see how many and the dates and times.

I get a call from the service prior to them arriving. That confirms to me that they did make the appt. It works great!
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Old 08-05-2013, 07:53 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
38,506 posts, read 30,560,504 times
Reputation: 53485
Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeJaquish View Post
But, marksmu is not wrong. Feedback can compromise the client, and helping the real estate agent is not an excuse for compromising the client.
I try to avoid any mention that the client likes the house, for example. I prefer to let the offer, or lack thereof, do the talking...
I agree that client representation should never be compromised, but I don't see how a generalized positive (if it's true) compromises their position. I mean along the lines of "They liked a lot about the house, but..." Or even "It's in their top three." I mean, if they make an offer, obviously they like the house. If they don't, they may have STILL liked the house - but it may not have fit their needs -or they may have hated the house. Either way, I don't see how telling the other agent that can compromise the situation.

Now, if you say, "They loved everything about it - they're dying to buy it. They're in an urgent situation and this is the only home they've seen that they've really liked," that sort of talk definitely compromises the buyer's position and should definitely be avoided.

Today I went and looked at three homes. Two were lovely, but the floorplan wouldn't work for our particular needs. I don't mind my agent telling the buyers' agent exactly that. The third one had a lot of advantages and some disadvantages, but overall it was a really cool house. The age was worrisome to me considering there were some signs of settling and I'd want that looked at closer. But I don't think it hurts my position for my agent to tell the other agent, "My client liked a lot about your sellers' house and may want to take a second look at it. The floors in the hall concern her, and she'd probably like to know more about any updates to the plumbing and electrical before she comes out again."

That's the sort of feedback that I think is constructive.
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