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Old 10-31-2015, 06:15 AM
 
Location: Howard County, Maryland
1,539 posts, read 1,597,982 times
Reputation: 2426

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I personally don't like them; but I work with buyers who do. Their main reason appears to be they like to have a separate room for every person, every hobby, every situation that may come up; no matter how remote or infrequent. I say "every" loosely, but people want movie rooms, guest rooms, sewing rooms, playrooms, reading rooms, breakfast rooms, separate dining rooms, party room with a bar, ect... These bigger houses (usually built in the 90's+) meet their needs. Again, not my thing but I'm a minimalist by nature.
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Old 10-31-2015, 07:33 AM
 
914 posts, read 702,476 times
Reputation: 926
What drives me crazy is that I often see McMansions built on busy streets. Why go to all the expense and trouble of building a giant house, and it's not only on a tiny lot, but on a busy street? Why???

At least find a decent location if you have all that money to spend.
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Old 10-31-2015, 09:15 AM
 
2,707 posts, read 3,790,790 times
Reputation: 3053
Quote:
Originally Posted by cjmeck View Post
I personally don't like them; but I work with buyers who do. Their main reason appears to be they like to have a separate room for every person, every hobby, every situation that may come up; no matter how remote or infrequent. I say "every" loosely, but people want movie rooms, guest rooms, sewing rooms, playrooms, reading rooms, breakfast rooms, separate dining rooms, party room with a bar, ect... These bigger houses (usually built in the 90's+) meet their needs. Again, not my thing but I'm a minimalist by nature.

This.

It's so PC to be anti-establishment and a large house is. The term McMansion brings out hate but it's really just a large house with many amenities.

I enjoy the idea of seeing the fruits of my labor.

I like everything in it's place and the bigger the better because I tend to be junky and when I have a smaller area I junk unnecessary things all over. If I have a room for it, then everything stays in it's pace rather than trying to fit in where it's just in the way. I like everything in it's own area. Cars belong in their own house so I have to have a detach garage.

Uncle Sam will take my money anyway so I may as well spend it on something useful like a place to live rather than having a small place and stuffing a little closet and room with purses, clothes and shoes.


Idiots buy large homes on small lots. Down here in the South we have plenty of space to build so many homes are on a large lot and not two cans and a string's distance from neighbors.
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Old 10-31-2015, 09:41 AM
 
Location: In a little house on the prairie - literally
10,202 posts, read 5,740,147 times
Reputation: 4508
Quote:
Originally Posted by DejaBlue View Post
This.

It's so PC to be anti-establishment and a large house is. The term McMansion brings out hate but it's really just a large house with many amenities.

I enjoy the idea of seeing the fruits of my labor.

I like everything in it's place and the bigger the better because I tend to be junky and when I have a smaller area I junk unnecessary things all over. If I have a room for it, then everything stays in it's pace rather than trying to fit in where it's just in the way. I like everything in it's own area. Cars belong in their own house so I have to have a detach garage.

Uncle Sam will take my money anyway so I may as well spend it on something useful like a place to live rather than having a small place and stuffing a little closet and room with purses, clothes and shoes.


Idiots buy large homes on small lots. Down here in the South we have plenty of space to build so many homes are on a large lot and not two cans and a string's distance from neighbors.
Actually, the term "McMansion" refers to the cookie cutter approach that the developments exhibit.

And every development looks the same.

Sort of like McDonalds, you know.
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Old 10-31-2015, 11:38 AM
 
5,683 posts, read 7,275,155 times
Reputation: 3198
Quote:
Originally Posted by stan4 View Post
Lots of people love them. That's why they sell.

I live in a neighborhood with 4000-6000+ square foot homes. But the lots are at least half an acre, and all the homes are custom built. That is what I like.
Except "what you like" is probably $1M+ in any area that is desirable. Many people can't afford that, so they buy McMansions instead.

One can tell from this thread that people have many different definitions of what constitutes a McMansion, but seems like in general they can refer to most cookie-cutter neighborhoods these days. And honestly, I bet a lot of people that live in these neighborhoods don't particularly like the fact that the houses are on top of each other or may not have top of the line finishes. But in many cases they offer the best bang for your buck in terms of space and neighborhood/schools.

And I don't think most people that live in McMansions consider them to be actual mansions. It's funny that the bashers say McMansion owners are pretending to live in luxury but at the same time criticize that the finishes are builder grade. No one I know with builder grade finishes in their home claims that those finishes are luxury. But that's what they can afford so they're okay with it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TN2HSV View Post
It's funny that people who complain about "all the houses look the same" probably love neighborhoods closer in to the city center that were built in the 1940s-50s. Well guess what? When THOSE houses were brand new, they probably looked very cookie cutter, too! And what about row homes? (like in Philly, Chicago, etc.) Those are all alike, have no yards, but have "character" just because they are old? Please.

Most ALL new neighborhoods lack character until the landscaping and trees take off & mature, and the homes go through a couple of remodels/refreshes that changes them enough on the outside to differentiate the neighborhood a little.

And repetitive floorplans are NOTHING new. Think about how many 50s-60s era ranch style houses you've been in. You know the one....the front door opens directly into the long living room that runs across the front of the house with the dining room at the other end. Kitchen is right behind dining room with a small den right behind living room. All bedrooms (usually 3) were off 1 hallway. Master had a small half or full bath attached and the "main" bathroom was off the bedroom hall. How many millions of homes were built with that SAME exact plan??? And most of them looked very similar on the outside, as well. But now those neighborhoods have tall, leafy trees and mature shrubs and slightly larger lots than you see today, and McMansion snobs eat those neighborhoods up. Give today's new neighborhoods 15-20 years, and they will have a lot more character than they do now, too.
+1. You can make the argument that many recent McMansions likely won't age that well, but a lot of the homes that are now considered "charming" were once cookie-cutter.
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Old 10-31-2015, 12:02 PM
 
Location: Oceania
8,623 posts, read 5,902,276 times
Reputation: 8318
Quote:
Originally Posted by LAappraiser View Post
Here in Los Angeles, at least, homeowners in established neighborhoods of mostly smaller older homes typically object to the "mansionization" trend because they feel that these homes are robbing the neighborhood of it's character. A number of jurisdictions have succeeded in passing laws which prevent such construction. However, I believe that if the architecture is tasteful these "McMansions" can add new vitality to an old neighborhood. As for why people like them, it's simple. They are big, beautiful and brand new! No worries about the plumbing or major systems going bad and causing costly repairs. Plus, people are beginning to appreciate the many energy efficient LEEDS building standards which are incorporated into these homes. They incorporate features that people like such as wide-plank flooring, whole house internet wiring, security systems, wine closets and energy efficient appliances. As for the "poor construction quality", I have news for you. I have appraised hundreds of homes and condos in mid-construction. Everything from condo projects in the Valley to custom homes in Bel Air. When it comes to the construction of the home itself, IT'S ALL THE SAME GUYS. They go from one project to the next. The differences are in the finish work only. I always chuckle when I think of the Beverly Hills matron lounging in her $ 15,000 jacuzzi tub who does not know that within the marble "box" that the the tub sits in are soda cans, McDonalds bags and more, all left behind by the "custom builder".
That same crap is buried anytime a crew backfills anything. It's cheaper than filling a dumpster. It's been a common practice for decades. Buried scrap lumber draws termites to the house. If you were to take down the sheetrock in a home you will most likely find the same trash as in stand of the Jacuzzi. The interior of houses are used as restrooms as workers urinate/defecate in every corner. If you have ever been on a construction site you have seen it.

100K homes being built in a region....it's not all the same guys. It's impossible. It could be the same company but so is Safeway and Albertson's. Do every one of those stores resemble each other other than the name? No, just like every construction crew is different. Some do good work and others build crap.
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Old 10-31-2015, 12:08 PM
 
2,707 posts, read 3,790,790 times
Reputation: 3053
Quote:
Originally Posted by cupper3 View Post
Actually, the term "McMansion" refers to the cookie cutter approach that the developments exhibit.

And every development looks the same.

Sort of like McDonalds, you know.

So really the term fits California and Arizona and Nevada homes. Those states have the iconic red shingle roof tract homes with no trees in the front yard and barely any grass too and each house looks the same. We have different models and elevations in most neighborhoods.

San Joes tract housing. https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikiped...%28crop%29.jpg

Like when I hear the term "development" that calls to mind the cookie cutter box big homes.
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Old 10-31-2015, 12:40 PM
 
Location: Denver CO
19,053 posts, read 10,086,762 times
Reputation: 27892
Quote:
Originally Posted by DejaBlue View Post
This.

It's so PC to be anti-establishment and a large house is. The term McMansion brings out hate but it's really just a large house with many amenities.

I enjoy the idea of seeing the fruits of my labor.

I like everything in it's place and the bigger the better because I tend to be junky and when I have a smaller area I junk unnecessary things all over. If I have a room for it, then everything stays in it's pace rather than trying to fit in where it's just in the way. I like everything in it's own area. Cars belong in their own house so I have to have a detach garage.

Uncle Sam will take my money anyway so I may as well spend it on something useful like a place to live rather than having a small place and stuffing a little closet and room with purses, clothes and shoes.


Idiots buy large homes on small lots. Down here in the South we have plenty of space to build so many homes are on a large lot and not two cans and a string's distance from neighbors.
So anyone who criticizes people who buy McMansions are haters but you are free to call someone who prefers a large home on a small lot an idiot?

Where I live, people strongly prefer small lots, and they don't buy here if that's not what they want. We have lots of public green space, and the benefit is that we get the use of those spaces without having to maintain them, especially not having to water them, which is a crucial consideration in this semi-arid climate with low precipitation. That doesn't make us idiots.
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Old 10-31-2015, 01:22 PM
 
Location: Boise, ID
494 posts, read 334,738 times
Reputation: 975
Quote:
Originally Posted by emm74 View Post
So anyone who criticizes people who buy McMansions are haters but you are free to call someone who prefers a large home on a small lot an idiot?

Where I live, people strongly prefer small lots, and they don't buy here if that's not what they want. We have lots of public green space, and the benefit is that we get the use of those spaces without having to maintain them, especially not having to water them, which is a crucial consideration in this semi-arid climate with low precipitation. That doesn't make us idiots.
I agree with you Emma. Boise doesn't have large lots either. Even older houses sit on 1/4 acre max. So there isn't the same option to buy older and get a big lot that there is in the east. I am also not into yard work or paying to water grass. I hate it! Our yard is for our dog and that is it.
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Old 10-31-2015, 01:24 PM
 
10,276 posts, read 6,523,579 times
Reputation: 10857
Quote:
Originally Posted by twodoor2 View Post
I always wondered why they're called "McMansions." Does it have something to do with the Irish??? Lol.

I assume people like them for the same reasons you do. It just seems that the people on this board prefer more unique, older and charming homes.
I think because of McDonalds because they are cheaply made like bad fast food.
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