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Old 11-11-2015, 03:39 PM
 
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Quote:
People tear down small ranches and put up big McMansions. It's a scourge in many established neighborhoods.
They do this in some cities for one reason. They want a large home, and there are no lots available to build on, due to scarcity of land to build on, or land control where the city fathers do not want more homes built, etc. The city government has made it impossible to get another place to build, so they do what they have to do, and buy a property as a tear down is the name for it.

They would not do this, if there was available lots, in areas they would accept living in.
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Old 11-11-2015, 04:34 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oldtrader View Post
They do this in some cities for one reason. They want a large home, and there are no lots available to build on, due to scarcity of land to build on, or land control where the city fathers do not want more homes built, etc. The city government has made it impossible to get another place to build, so they do what they have to do, and buy a property as a tear down is the name for it.

They would not do this, if there was available lots, in areas they would accept living in.
The problem lies with the people looking for "areas they would accept living in", then, doesn't it?

So many beautiful, established neighborhoods are being destroyed by people buying properties as teardowns. The only way to prevent it is through zoning, and municipalities see dollar signs instead of the integrity of their neighborhoods. Ugh.
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Old 11-11-2015, 07:04 PM
 
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Originally Posted by TN2HSV View Post
It's funny that people who complain about "all the houses look the same" probably love neighborhoods closer in to the city center that were built in the 1940s-50s. Well guess what? When THOSE houses were brand new, they probably looked very cookie cutter, too! And what about row homes? (like in Philly, Chicago, etc.) Those are all alike, have no yards, but have "character" just because they are old? Please.

Most ALL new neighborhoods lack character until the landscaping and trees take off & mature, and the homes go through a couple of remodels/refreshes that changes them enough on the outside to differentiate the neighborhood a little.

And repetitive floorplans are NOTHING new. Think about how many 50s-60s era ranch style houses you've been in. You know the one....the front door opens directly into the long living room that runs across the front of the house with the dining room at the other end. Kitchen is right behind dining room with a small den right behind living room. All bedrooms (usually 3) were off 1 hallway. Master had a small half or full bath attached and the "main" bathroom was off the bedroom hall. How many millions of homes were built with that SAME exact plan??? And most of them looked very similar on the outside, as well. But now those neighborhoods have tall, leafy trees and mature shrubs and slightly larger lots than you see today, and McMansion snobs eat those neighborhoods up. Give today's new neighborhoods 15-20 years, and they will have a lot more character than they do now, too.
I can remember my parents talking about split entry homes with the same disdain as some people talk about McMansions....

As to the neighborhoods with character? Anyone who lives in a neighborhood with character can go to the local library and check newspapers from when their home was built and find ads about their "new development".

I've done it. My house is 91 years old....
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Old 11-11-2015, 07:11 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallysmom View Post
I can remember my parents talking about split entry homes with the same disdain as some people talk about McMansions....

As to the neighborhoods with character? Anyone who lives in a neighborhood with character can go to the local library and check newspapers from when their home was built and find ads about their "new development".

I've done it. My house is 91 years old....
That's hilarious .. And in my opinion spot on! Hey someone must like these McMansions as they do sell and are cropping up everywhere . So, they must suit some people and so there are some out there who like them like I do .
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Old 12-13-2015, 09:27 PM
 
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We look at ton of real estate weekly !

We have looked at our share of them, most of them are ugly. Seriously, the design and the flow is off. At certain point, it is odd to open a door see another bedroom, with a big bathroom...open another door, another big bedroom and big bathroom and so it goes. One house had big ballroom with a disco ball, like most people are not going to needs that ?


One we looked at had really beautiful real wool floral rug very European feeling, and beautiful painting in the dining room wall of an Italian vineyards it was beautiful at one time, and most of it is dated.it has is been on the market for years!


We watched mega mansion sit on the market so long owners let it go into foreclosure. they end up neglected dated, with squatters. I saw one that had been sitting for so long it had black mold it sold for , 75% less because no one wanted it, because people are now very aware that black mold could mean life and death for you or for someone in your family, who cares to risk life and limb for piece of wood!



My good friend is a realtor and repeatedly tell me a 2500 to 3500 square foot house with good design,at a good location gets bought up in record speed. In fact, the buyers become increasing less on the mega-mansion levels, so if you buy one hope you can wait years to sell it, Some mega-mansions are beautiful I've seen two that were perfect, great design, great view , level property, great neighborhood, well maintained, no mold smells, no pet smells, no urine smells or cigarette smoke smell. The design was good had a incredible flow and had a lovely art gallery that opened off unto a terrace for looking an English garden it was stunning.
Some of them do get snapped up but it had to be the right buyer.

I'm a realist why invest in a house that might take years to sell and doesn't even feel homey warm, or comfortable.


I love the old 1950;s houses redone big, lots, and tons of trees and weeping willows surrounding a lake will do me fine.

Last edited by Kung pao; 12-13-2015 at 09:50 PM.. Reason: 1
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Old 12-14-2015, 11:23 PM
 
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While they are gorgeous, I've noticed that a ton of them sort of look naked in terms of privacy.

You go into these neighborhoods with these huge homes, all of this INCREDIBLE work put into the house, the circular stone driveways, and then it seems like people just picked up and left. A big barren back yard with no privacy and open field.

I don't know. I've seen some homes with incredible backyards and standard sized homes and they can seem more beautiful than the mansions with nothing else.
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Old 12-14-2015, 11:28 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Briolat21 View Post
Because people find it easier to look down on something that is "mass produced".

Its just a trend at the moment.

The same way that artisnal cheese at your local market is better than a mass-produced aged gouda (well, not necessarily) and the same way that a micro brew is better than a guiness (oh wait..)

basically its a snob-way to differentiate - because god knows we can't just say "Differences make the world go round, live and let live.."

Of course, all those charming mid-century homes, as well as Queen Anns and Victorians and Row Houses...

they were pretty much identical when they were built (not unusual for one or two builders in a town to build the majority of new houses over their lifetimes...).. and its only been in the succeeding decades that they differentiated from one another -- as various owners changed roof lines, put on additions, radically changed landscaping and major fixtures (windows/doors/etc..)..

If you look in most "old" neighborhoods, you can tell that the bones of the houses are nearly identical to their brethren on either side (and across the street) - up and down the whole neighborhood.

But because those are "OLD" now, they are better.


I would suggest not worrying what others think, and just going with what you actually like. Because trying to please the trend makers is a no-win game.
I thought it was because if you're dropping 2 million on a home, you don't want it to look like the one next door?
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Old 12-15-2015, 02:45 AM
 
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To me (the area I grew up in)
Cheap, poorly constructed (the legal minimum) large homes crammed on tiny lots so one can wave at their neighbor through the side windows while each is in their own house. Vast expanses of drywall and popcorn finish. Flimsy framing, poor insulation, Hemorrhages money to heat and cool (since it was built cheap). Tacky cheap finishes, poorly thought out layouts. The smart buyers I knew got em cheap and used, and use them to house multiple generations/branches of their family while the working adults can live nicely, fix up the place and they all bank cash- those money pits are way cheaper then renting in that area, or each couple having their own single family unit. So they are great for the right buyers one can get a lot of bang for their buck sqft wise, and it's a nobrainer if you have multiple adults around to share in the bills and upkeep.

Better quality homes that happened to be huge new or old, that had style and better finishes, actual yards were simply big houses. The Mc here is a bit of a McDonalds reference. big and cheap/crappy.
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Old 12-15-2015, 04:48 PM
 
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Originally Posted by FalconheadWest View Post
The McMansion term came about in my area only referring to the houses that have been torn down and rebuilt much larger, to their building lines, so they almost topple on top of the smaller, older homes. These homes are sometimes 2-3 times the size of the existing homes in the neighborhood.

Large homes in suburban neighborhoods that might look the exact same are not referred to as McMansions.

I would agree about the original use of the term, but it's become of broader meaning (or so broad as to no meaning!)

On the first point, heh, reminded me of a situation near my parents house. They are in a mid-century ranch development, not huge homes (2500sq) but mostly custom designs, nicer than your average 1960s tract ranches.

A kid from my high school did well in real estate, but wanted to stay living very close to his family. So around 2000 he found a homeowner on my parents block with a slightly oversize lot (12000 sq feet where most are 9000), got they guy to split and sell half, then put up a 4,500+ home on the small lot that is just a mess of gables and arches and geegaws and faux this-and-that exterior treatements, topped off with a pretentious stonework driveway that was occupied by, of course, his-and-hers Hummers. Looks utterly ridiculous just towering over the horizontal, subdued ranches that it is squeezed between.

I think that counts as a McMansion.
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Old 12-16-2015, 09:41 PM
 
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Quote:
A kid from my high school did well in real estate, but wanted to stay living very close to his family. So around 2000 he found a homeowner on my parents block with a slightly oversize lot (12000 sq feet where most are 9000), got they guy to split and sell half, then put up a 4,500+ home on the small lot that is just a mess of gables and arches and geegaws and faux this-and-that exterior treatements, topped off with a pretentious stonework driveway that was occupied by, of course, his-and-hers Hummers. Looks utterly ridiculous just towering over the horizontal, subdued ranches that it is squeezed between.
HAHAHA! I love how you wrote this. Yeah, I think that deserves the Mc title. I've seen stuff like this, beautiful mature well maintained neighborhood, houses that are set back on nice lots, mature trees, no matter the period of build just a lovely treat to stroll, and then BOOM one huge eyesore house complete with (in your words) "a mess of gables and arches and geegaws and faux this-and-that exterior treatements" that is owned by a wannabe donald trump.

Bystanders laugh, but the long term residents of that street I assume are not laughing. It's like seeing a truck with the plastic balls hanging off the back, coated with stickers, extra lights, smoke stack and a lift kit so big it's illegal you simply can't have towed away.
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