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Old 10-30-2015, 03:41 PM
 
6,155 posts, read 3,230,384 times
Reputation: 12473

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Quote:
Originally Posted by .sparrow. View Post
Whatever makes people happy. I have a friend who just bought one and she's thrilled about it. I'm happy for her.

Personally, I love old established neighborhoods where all of the houses are different from each other and have big private back yards. (This is why I like ramblers, if you have a privacy fence, no-one is looking at you from the 2nd floor of the next door house.)

I also love older houses because they have a history. In one of my bedroom closets, there is some crazy far-out, 3-D wallpaper on the ceiling that I KNOW someone must have put there in the 60's. I never took it down. It's still there. I like all of the old fixtures. I just like old stuff, in general. I'm not a fan of shiny new things.

My house was built before I was born. That's kind of cool. This house has been here longer than I have. It's kind of comforting in an odd way. Maybe I'm weird.
I like the older homes, too. It's a tradeoff, though. They also have older electrical and plumbing, which is a pain. But I admit that the old homes and neighbors, if properly maintained, make my heart flutter. I NEVER get that feeling in the new areas, no matter how nice the homes.
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Old 10-30-2015, 03:46 PM
 
6,155 posts, read 3,230,384 times
Reputation: 12473
Quote:
Originally Posted by nidss77 View Post
IMHO youre right on!! Thats how I feel about newer subdivisions. what is it about wooded lots, front and back that people love. I saw a 30 yr old neighborhood with wooded front lots and large front yards but they looked so unkempt as the trees were not too huge and it doesnt help that the leaves were all over the place and the houses themslelves, looked like they were over their prime ( theyre all brick facade but were starting to fade). it IS a prestigious neighborhood though. and the realtor was telling me to build a NEW custom build on a corner lot that old street. But all the other house were too damn old for my tastes. they might be awesome inside, but anyone pulling up to my new neighborhood would wonder why i would put up a brand new house on that past it prime but prestigiuous neighborood?
I like leaves all over the place.

There is a thing that started with homes being built in burbs after WWII...no more leaves, no more this or that. Manicured lawns to the extreme. Nothing to indicate that there was ever any nature around.

I love the trees and the leaves. And squirrels and critters. We ARE part of the earth. It's fruitless to try to keep one little square devoid of nature, and not very appealing.

The old homes show their age, no doubt about it. But it's interesting they're still around to show their age. You have new construction that isn't aging well...sheetrock from China that causes black mold, foundation problems, broken things.
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Old 10-30-2015, 05:02 PM
 
155 posts, read 163,634 times
Reputation: 126
i guess one way to buy the mcmansions is to wait out 5-6 years so all the major issues have been sorted out?
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Old 10-30-2015, 06:21 PM
 
5,716 posts, read 4,569,579 times
Reputation: 4101
Quote:
Originally Posted by bpollen View Post
I like the older homes, too. It's a tradeoff, though. They also have older electrical and plumbing, which is a pain. But I admit that the old homes and neighbors, if properly maintained, make my heart flutter. I NEVER get that feeling in the new areas, no matter how nice the homes.
true. My one bathroom...wow. yeah. I do kind of wish I could squish one of those mcmansion bathrooms in here, somehow. heehee.
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Old 10-30-2015, 07:15 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
31,153 posts, read 57,173,594 times
Reputation: 51994
My 90-year-old, cookie-cutter house would have been considered a McMansion back in 1925. LOL

Many of them are very nice houses, but they're just too big for me. Some of the features - dining room when you walk in the front door (if there's one at all), kitchen open to the living room, vaulted everything, master bathroom bigger than most of the bedrooms - are not my speed. Other features - more than one bathroom, first floor laundry room, big garages - I'd love to have!
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Old 10-30-2015, 07:50 PM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
363 posts, read 390,279 times
Reputation: 400
Quote:
Originally Posted by ohio_peasant View Post
A McMansion is a garish, tawdry and ultimately low-quality facsimile of genuine luxury. It is mass-produced. It is based on borrowed and derivative style, and tends towards the vulgar. It's positively dripping with the phony and the aspirational. It's rampant example of upper-middle-class consumers trying to reach beyond their station in life.

A real mansion is lovingly designed by an eminent architect, is built by the finest craftsmen, and goes on to be maintained by a full-time crew. A real mansion carries historical significance, being passed on from generation to generation. It is rarely sold, and is never "flipped".

^^^This. if you're worried about re-sale, you need to get to know your buyer. Here in Southern California, McMansions are popular in the 909.

Urban Dictionary: 909

Most of the residents of the 909 moved there because they can't afford to live in L.A. or Orange County. Many of them are lower middle class, not college educated, and not well-traveled; so for them, a McMansion would most likely feel luxe.

HOWEVER, where I live (Pasadena, CA) a McMansion would NEVER fly. We value good bones, design integrity and architectural pedigree. It's not uncommon to see even modest houses in my neighborhood on the historical registry.
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Old 10-30-2015, 09:05 PM
 
Location: In a little house on the prairie - literally
10,202 posts, read 5,709,986 times
Reputation: 4508
Quote:
Originally Posted by johngolf View Post
Most that belittle them cannot afford them. Same with ZIP Code envy.
I think cookie cutter developments are the worst invention ever, and then along came the McMansions. Horrible... all flash, no quality, one like the other.

Never would I own one ever.

Oh, and affordability? I have a house, and two different vacation condos. But no McMansion. They constrain you.
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Old 10-30-2015, 09:15 PM
 
Location: Kalamalka Lake, B.C.
2,943 posts, read 3,747,543 times
Reputation: 3744
Design is everything. The nicest house I've ever been in a friend built at 2350 sq. ft.: four bathrooms, two bedrooms. Best layout I've ever seen, and people/lifestyle comfortable. \

BUT McMansions are for extended family cultures around here: Chinese, East Indian. Usually the design is pretty bad on the inside (I've seen many) to where an 8,000 sq. ft.'er looks and acts like a 2350 sq. ft. Layout is wrong; and NO ELEVATOR and you have FIVE elderly relatives living with you?, with your dining area on one floor and your kitchen on another? What were you thinking????

Back when I was living with five Japanese ladies a McMansion would have been appreciated, but they would have left me if the design wasn't smart. !!!
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Old 10-30-2015, 09:37 PM
 
Location: San Francisco Bay Area
4,121 posts, read 2,142,321 times
Reputation: 8015
Quote:
Originally Posted by luv4horses View Post
Often the McMansions are lovely, but they seem out of place on the tiny lots.
They don't just seem out of place on tiny lots, they are out of place on tiny lots.

These double-decker monsters infringe on the privacy of neighbors. Yes, I think they are supremely tacky.

That said, a lovely mansion, especially made years ago, with mature landscaping on a large lot, that would be more my cup of tea.
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Old 10-31-2015, 05:21 AM
 
Location: 57
1,428 posts, read 767,167 times
Reputation: 1262
Giraffe doors.
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