U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Real Estate
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 11-09-2015, 05:53 AM
 
914 posts, read 697,641 times
Reputation: 926

Advertisements

I would also find out how long the sellers lived there, and prior history, because if the house keeps switching hands, there's probably an issue.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 11-09-2015, 07:32 AM
 
Location: Northern Virginia
4,665 posts, read 4,811,825 times
Reputation: 10963
I currently live in a town home so personally, my next home will not have shared walls. As for location, I do not want to live on a busy street nor a cul-de-sac.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-09-2015, 12:53 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
31,153 posts, read 57,185,461 times
Reputation: 51999
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tac-Sea View Post
But surely there is a list similar for to the apartments to be avoided for houses? Like no houses on corner lots, no houses in high renter ratio areas, no houses on a busy street, no houses with an HOA, etc.
There are no "rules" and everyone's preferences vary. Some corner lots are perfectly beautiful and private. The neighbors on both sides of me are renters, and they take better care of the property than their owners did when they lived there. I wouldn't be crazy about a busy street, but if I found the perfect house at the perfect price, I could compromise on the busy street, or any number of other things.

Every home purchase requires compromise. The instant you say "I'll never ... ", you just might.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sandy Nelson View Post
I always make sure my buyers have a 3-business-day "neighborhood review" clause in their contracts, and urge them to drive by and walk around the neighborhood on evenings to check out noise, parking, traffic etc.
Well, anyone with half a brain would check out the neighborhood before making an offer.

Best times to check out the neighborhood: weekday afternoon, weekday evening, Saturday night, Sunday afternoon. Trash day is also a good time to look around. Don't just drive through - get out of the car and walk around.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-10-2015, 07:41 AM
 
1,279 posts, read 1,164,506 times
Reputation: 1710
Quote:
Originally Posted by mkarch View Post
You won't always know. Now that I've lived in my neighborhood for a few years I've noticed that when houses come on the market the "trouble" neighbors remain quiet during and after the sale then have a big thundershow to "welcome the new neighbors to the block". The new neighbors typically paid in the $700K+ range, so it's a bit of a surprise to them when the mad max on meth show starts.

Most of the other neighbors don't talk about the problem for fear that the people doing this will harass them or prevent them from selling their own house.

Really you need to find an honest person already in the neighborhood that will tell you if there are trouble houses. I'm better at spotting them now that I've been here a while.

Here are a few tips:

- The house hasn't been sold recently, especially original owner houses tend to have issues. A lot of time's it's that their loser kids inherited the place and never had to pay a dime to live there, so they don't give a rats ass about anyone else. Typical entitlement issues.

- It's a run down rental. Usually easy to spot due to lack of upkeep or bad landscaping despite obviously being "well lived in".

- The neighbors have all put up fences and grown tall hedges to block their view of the property, even if it "looks nice enough".

- Anyone collecting junk or scrap. Sometimes these are just hoarders, but more often than not it's drugs.

My wife and I totally got taken for a ride. Every time we came to see our house the neighborhood was quiet and nothing seemed out of the ordinary. Within a month after moving in it was screaming meth fights, tv/radio blasting, cars revving and constant pounding or other mechanical sounds all day long.
I've had largely the same experience after vetting each place I lived. I went and visited the house and parked in front days, nights, weekends, for hours on end. Nothing.

Two weeks within moving in. Bam, immediately realize who the problem neighbors are. Usually just one or two.

Thing is, even if you get the right neighborhood NOW, neighbors change. Some rentals in my neighborhood were sold, other owner occupant houses were foreclosed and converted to rentals etc. At one house I lived in I had almost all of my neighbors change within 3 or 4 years.

Point is, if it it's bad now, it might get better when neighbors change. If it's good now, it might get bad when neighbors change.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-10-2015, 07:50 AM
 
1,279 posts, read 1,164,506 times
Reputation: 1710
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hemlock140 View Post
Read the demographics, you will see things like the percentage of owners vs renters, poverty levels, median family incomes, and other facts that help you
determine the kind of place you want to live. I don't see the problem with a corner lot, we chose our place partly because it was a corner lot. Much more privacy with only one neighbor on one side and then a house behind us, on the other side no one. Also, we looked for a quiet street away from major arterials, 2 miles from the nearest store/strip mall, and 6-8 miles from the nearest freeway. For most cities there are plenty of school reviews and crime maps available online. Then drive around many times of the day and night and observe what's going on, if anything, in the neighborhood.

Did that too. Even in a neighborhood with half a million dollar homes, I was surprised a month after moving in that my neighbor is a football fanatic. To the point they light LOUD fireworks every play, while they and their 15 drunk guests celebrate outside by taking their shirts off and trying to climb the light poles, etc.

It seems like everywhere you go, there is at least one inconsiderate douchebag. Last neighborhood, 300K houses, neighbor held loud parties every summer.

Maybe it's time to move to the country. There is the saying that you can have it done right, cheap or fast, pick two. Maybe the same applies to this. You can live with an easy commute/transit options close to jobs or have peace and quiet (in the country), but not both.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-10-2015, 01:06 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
31,153 posts, read 57,185,461 times
Reputation: 51999
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tac-Sea View Post
Point is, if it it's bad now, it might get better when neighbors change. If it's good now, it might get bad when neighbors change.
Life is like that. Perhaps you should get used to it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tac-Sea View Post
It seems like everywhere you go, there is at least one inconsiderate douchebag.
That's true, and it's true across every income level. Something else you can't prevent or predict. Get used to that, too.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-10-2015, 09:16 PM
 
Location: South Park, San Diego
4,623 posts, read 7,042,368 times
Reputation: 8434
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tac-Sea View Post
Did that too. Even in a neighborhood with half a million dollar homes, I was surprised a month after moving in that my neighbor is a football fanatic. To the point they light LOUD fireworks every play, while they and their 15 drunk guests celebrate outside by taking their shirts off and trying to climb the light poles, etc.

It seems like everywhere you go, there is at least one inconsiderate douchebag. Last neighborhood, 300K houses, neighbor held loud parties every summer.

Maybe it's time to move to the country. There is the saying that you can have it done right, cheap or fast, pick two. Maybe the same applies to this. You can live with an easy commute/transit options close to jobs or have peace and quiet (in the country), but not both.
Unless you've got 40 acres or so I think the country is just as likely to be irritatingly noisy as most city neighborhoods; incessant gunshots; loose, barking dogs attacking livestock- or the country favorite, mad dogs in chains and bare dirt; chainsaws or earth moving equipment; ATVs; loud outdoor parties. Give me close, mostly quiet (or when there is a noisy party at least I have a standing invitation) neighbors I know as friends and can talk to when problems arise as opposed to people hating hermits who don't give a damn about anyone else which is why they moved to the country in the first place.

I live right in the heart of the city and while I can hear the hum of it, rarely the roar (I'll just as likely hear coyotes or owls) and get along famously with all my neighbors; most all the places in the country I've lived or know of well by family and friends there are often more noisy and problematic because of cranky country folks fiercely staking their claim.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-11-2015, 08:29 AM
 
Location: New Orleans, LA
1,655 posts, read 2,971,300 times
Reputation: 2760
My new neighborhood has been pretty nice. It was built around 1955-1965, and most of my neighbors are the original owners and therefore mostly retired (like me). So, they share many of the same values and behaviors that I appreciate. They are quiet, mind their own business, and keep their property looking nice. The street is hard to get to/from, because other streets do not go through to this one for some reason. So, while we have some traffic, it could be much worse.

I knew that I liked the location before buying the house. I have lived just three miles away for a couple of decades. My dear gentleman friend lives on this block and I saw this block daily for many years. I moved in next door to him. Any neighborhood can change, and when selecting a location all one can do is the best one can. However, knowing the neighborhood well over decades does help.

I bought the house because of its location next door to my sweetie and because the neighborhood is very walkable and quiet. However, the prior owner had done much to make the house "elderly friendly" since she is about 10-15 years older than me. So, that's nice. I won't have to do much in that regard to prepare as I grow older.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-11-2015, 08:46 AM
 
277 posts, read 248,659 times
Reputation: 324
It's always hard to know what to look for if you haven't experienced something yet.

If you like up and moving when you're ready to pursue a different type of living
then you actually learn a little something new each time.

Some people luck out on the first move and stay put.

..while others have the Nomad gene in them and move when they feel the mountains calling.
(if they already work from home and puts no pressure on the monetary part.)

The thing I have learned in moving is to have enough space from others so you aren't bothered by them.

............. PRIVACY ..............

is the most beloved & cherishable virtue in the pursuit of home & happiness.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-11-2015, 08:47 AM
 
914 posts, read 697,641 times
Reputation: 926
The house I just bought was owned by the original owners for 50 years. They both just passed away, so that was concerting that they lived there that long. Their adult son was selling it. I already met one of the neighbors and saw some of the nearby neighbors. Most are like me, middle aged, have some kids, etc. . .

It's on a quiet street. I've gone past there at all times of the day, and late at night. It was nice to only hear crickets at 10:00 PM. I hope it's that way for a long time, but you can never guarantee that your neighbors will be perfect. When I recently moved out of my home, I thought I was loud because I would always yell at my kids, but my neighbors were still sad to see me go. They kept saying, "we hope we get good neighbors." Well no need to worry, as I heard the new owners are never seen or heard from, and their lawn is well maintained and they already did some improvements to the outside of the home, in effect, the perfect neighbors. I hope they raise my old neighbors' property values, LOL!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Real Estate
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 04:19 PM.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top