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Old 04-12-2016, 08:23 PM
 
18 posts, read 25,635 times
Reputation: 27

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Quote:
Originally Posted by hljc View Post
Should get a lawyer and make a suite against the former owners , and if this is the government ,....................... as the plan was to build on the property was changed by this wet land rule for some corrupt reason ........ In some areas people just get clean fill and build up the land for housing , and the wet land animals can take a hike
A good lawyer prob. would be the best.
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Old 04-13-2016, 07:56 AM
 
Location: Youngstown, Oh.
4,844 posts, read 7,504,046 times
Reputation: 4415
Quote:
Originally Posted by floridacoast View Post
A good lawyer prob. would be the best.
It seems to me that starting the process to have the extent of the wetlands delineated would be the logical first step.


Having a plan that shows how much--if any--of the land is buildable would make it much more saleable. And, if it turns out that none of the land is buildable, you'll have that information to see a lawyer with.
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Old 04-13-2016, 08:15 AM
 
14,932 posts, read 16,975,810 times
Reputation: 13246
Don't blame the environmentalists. The wetland situation is more likely related to preventing future flooding of existing homes/businesses. It's a known issue that wetlands take/hold water and when those wetlands are removed/built upon, then that water needs to go elsewhere. Often it travels to other properties that are already built upon and causes flooding.

In your case, the person at the county that you spoke to might not have known the actual cost for evaluation. After all, they would likely never see the bills because those go to the property owners. The county person might have guessed that it's costly - or possibly they remember hearing about a large subdivision parcel that was in the news and it had a high price for lawyers and then the county person might have incorrectly assumed that all properties have that same price for evaluation of wetlands. So don't make this important decision based on heresay from 1 county employee.

What you need to do is find out who is the proper engineering firm or land planner in that area. Preferrably a firm that most people use because that firm knows all the steps required. Get a quote from that firm for evaluating your property and also for doing all the documentation/submittals that are required. And also ask how long this typically takes.

If you have oaks and pines and gray soil, it's likely that that portion is not a wetland.
Right now is dry season in Florida and there are some wetlands that are dry right now but begin filling with water in June, July, Aug,Sept.

Here are firms that do this. You want to take notes when you speak with them so you learn all the necessary steps that need to take place.
Ask them first for quote for cheapest option for them to give opinion on whether the property really has wetlands and if it's worth it to go forward with the official steps needed in order to get approval from the county to build

http://universalengineering.com/locations/

http://www.flatwoodsconsulting.com/services.aspx

Here is a listing of many diff firms

http://www.b2byellowpages.com/las/en...da-34470.shtml

Last edited by sware2cod; 04-13-2016 at 08:25 AM..
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Old 02-21-2019, 03:32 PM
 
1 posts, read 261 times
Reputation: 14
We bought land in 1986 and the same was declared it wet lands in 2012 completely devaluating the property to zero. NEVER will I own property in this god forsaken state again, florida that is. I am hoping to get enough people together to file a class action suit ad the SUPREME COURT has slapped these people before for what is CALLED taking of land with out compensation.
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Old 02-21-2019, 05:46 PM
 
Location: Rochester, WA
4,542 posts, read 2,507,884 times
Reputation: 12683
Unless drainage has changed in the area... it isn't the actual land that has likely changed, only the wetland mapping has changed to recognize what is there.

Counties and jurisdictions differ on what is and isn't allowed on wetlands and within wetland buffers.

Impossible to know from here whether the entire property is wetland, buffer or only parts of it are. Sometimes part of the property will be declared wetland or wetland buffer, but a part of the land can still be used and developed. Sometimes the unusable area can be valued at a reduced tax rate. Further communications with the county and perhaps a professional wetland delineation would tell you for sure.
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Old 02-26-2019, 09:00 AM
 
Location: Floribama
14,153 posts, read 30,369,424 times
Reputation: 12778
Quote:
Originally Posted by floridacoast View Post
Over 45 million acres of the U.S. have NEW wetlands data posted on the Wetlands Mapper. These updates include portions of the lower 48 states as well as Alaska and Hawaii. Link to the updates Wetlands Map. In case anyone else wants to check it out.

National Wetlands Inventory Home Page
I was looking at the wetland areas on that map. I know of one area where a new assisted living facility was built a few years ago that is shown as wetland. I knew that land was low and wet when they built it, but somehow they got away with it.
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Old 02-26-2019, 09:21 AM
 
Location: Paradise
2,431 posts, read 1,908,560 times
Reputation: 3964
Quote:
Originally Posted by southernnaturelover View Post
I was looking at the wetland areas on that map. I know of one area where a new assisted living facility was built a few years ago that is shown as wetland. I knew that land was low and wet when they built it, but somehow they got away with it.


It is not illegal to build on wetlands. The issue is mitigation. Permitting is time consuming, but mitigation is costly. If one wants to build on an area of wetland, they must create (mitigate) another wetland in the same drainage basin to essentially do the same job the destroyed wetland did. The replacement area can vary based on the type of wetland exists. Some wetland types need to be replaced at a factor of 2:1. Some are 1:1 (never less than that).


Developers often have the funds necessary to pay those mitigation costs (up to, and including, purchasing other property for mitigation). Most regular folks don't - which is why most people think building on wetlands is impossible. It's not. There are just very specific rules to follow.
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Old 02-26-2019, 05:58 PM
 
Location: on the wind
5,701 posts, read 2,204,361 times
Reputation: 19602
Quote:
Originally Posted by lunetunelover View Post
It is not illegal to build on wetlands. The issue is mitigation. Permitting is time consuming, but mitigation is costly. If one wants to build on an area of wetland, they must create (mitigate) another wetland in the same drainage basin to essentially do the same job the destroyed wetland did. The replacement area can vary based on the type of wetland exists. Some wetland types need to be replaced at a factor of 2:1. Some are 1:1 (never less than that).


Developers often have the funds necessary to pay those mitigation costs (up to, and including, purchasing other property for mitigation). Most regular folks don't - which is why most people think building on wetlands is impossible. It's not. There are just very specific rules to follow.
Correct. There are many different wetland classifications, some more ephemeral than others. Some might only hold water in extremely wet years. There is no way to predict which years will end up being wetter or drier. The classifications adjacent to the one being looked at also affect whether it would be feasible to develop or not. Mitigations may not be possible or advisable because of the adjacent areas. Development that was permitted (via mitigation somewhere else) can alter flow and soils to the point another adjacent wetland can't be.
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Old Today, 04:42 AM
 
8,769 posts, read 7,747,949 times
Reputation: 19048
A lot of posters are confusing wet lands, and property zoned as flood plane or other flood zoning. Wet land zoned property is federally protected and not local protected.

What Is A Wetland? — The Wetlands Initiative

Some say sue the seller. If the property was given wet land protection after the sale, you will not get a court decision against the seller, as it happened after the sale and the seller is not responsible for such changes after the sale.

If the wetland protection was in existence before the purchase the bank would not have made the loan due to land being basically worthless as a building site, etc..
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