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Old 06-02-2017, 11:23 PM
 
3,460 posts, read 1,954,222 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiethegreat View Post
I'm happy for the tiny house craze I've wanted one for a very long time,mortgages enslave people for life and noone wants that.
Enslave? You have a strange relationship with money. You purchase a regular size home, live in it for many years, perhaps until you retire, sell it for much more than what you paid for it. That is not enslavement that is return on investment and you have a nice place to live. Better than voluntarily imprisoning yourself in a tiny cell.
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Old 06-02-2017, 11:28 PM
 
3,460 posts, read 1,954,222 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bookspage View Post
Oh ok. That's what I thought. I have a backyard but I can't let someone live on it in a tiny house

On HGTV, most of people seem to mooch off their friends and relatives and put them on their land
Exactly, which is no different than living in one of their spare bedrooms and using the house.

It is fine to talk against regular size home ownership, property taxes, costs and then live on someone else's land for free and come into their home to take a shower.
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Old 06-03-2017, 06:53 AM
 
16,484 posts, read 17,501,756 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CGab View Post
I personally think the "Tiny" homes are good only for singles or younger couples without kids. Most retirees are not going to wasn't to climb a ladder to get up to a loft bed. I also can't see a family living in one. I know there has been a few shows showing families moving into one, but I think they will regret that in a few years. Kids need space!


I do agree that the whole "big" house movement is starting to die and most people are being more realistic in what they need in a home versus buying more. WE moved from a 3400 sq ft home to a 2300 sq ft home and it's perfect for my family of 4. I know many who are moving into half the space that they used to have. I think there will always be people who want a big home, but the era of "McMansions" is over.
Nope. The McMansion movement is alive and well. Doubt it will ever go away. We moved from 1700 sq ft to 2300 sq ft. This is about as big a house as I would ever really want.



Quote:
Originally Posted by jayguy01 View Post
Not a tiny house exactly, but when it comes time for me to settle down and any kids are out on their own I want a relatively small house. I'd likely need to have it custom built. I stayed at the Vdara about 18 months back and got a 1-bedroom panoramic suite. 8-850 SQFT. If I could add a garage, a covered patio out back and a walk-in closet, I'd be more than happy to call that home.
Truthfully you may be ok with 859 sq ft. You may find a buyer when you eventually sell but you're going to sell a lot faster if it's normal size. And just remember it's a lot ore expensive to add sq ft later than it is to build at the same time. You don't have to use the whole house.
If you eventually have kids, get married etc 850 sq ft is not going to be enough.




Quote:
Originally Posted by eastcoastguyz View Post
Exactly, which is no different than living in one of their spare bedrooms and using the house.

It is fine to talk against regular size home ownership, property taxes, costs and then live on someone else's land for free and come into their home to take a shower.
Yup. This just about says it all. this while tiny house movement is nothing more than a passing fad. Like corduroy and bell bottoms it will fade away.

If you were really looking at reducing your carbon footprint you would go refurbish a already built trailer rather than building one from scratch.

I have a 34 foot Airstream that's in perfect condition and cost a fraction of what a tiny house costs. And when I sell it I'll get more than I paid for it. Meanwhile it will outlast any tiny home built today and it's actually comfortable for extended camping.
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Old 06-03-2017, 06:56 AM
 
2,039 posts, read 946,996 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oregonwoodsmoke View Post
Which, of course, means that they can cook in their friend's kitchen, take showers in the friend's full size shower, use the friend's washer and dryer, and go and sit in the friend's den to watch the big screen TV.

So, they aren't really living full time in their cute little bedroom.
Exactly. It's a farce

I like the ones where it's a couple with kids and they go live on Grandma's land. Gee I wonder where the kids will be
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Old 06-03-2017, 08:58 AM
 
1,765 posts, read 866,602 times
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Sometimes I think this trend was started by parents to get their adult kids out of their basement.

"Here honey! We will build you your OWN little house allllll the way over on the other side of the property! Isn't that great? And look! It is mobile! So you can tow it anywhere you want!!"
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Old 06-03-2017, 09:31 AM
 
Location: San Diego
32,798 posts, read 30,025,534 times
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We have one, right next to our 2400 sq house. It's in the driveway and it's called a travel trailer. Makes a great guest house, not so much something I'd live in permanently.


A used TT can be had for 5000. I'm not paying ten times that for a TT with shingles.
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Old 06-03-2017, 09:42 AM
 
Location: Ventura, Ca
89 posts, read 40,302 times
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My partner and I watch these tiny house shows quite a bit and pretty much just ridicule the people on the shows. The show talks about being this tiny house craze going on but I just think it's more tiny house crazy. I think it's great if you want some small cabin on a piece of land you own somewhere out in the forest or on a lake but these TV shows talk about these people that want to downsize out of some large house that they have a gigantic mortgage on so what do they do… They go find someone that has decided to take it upon themselves to build these things. Mind you, they don't have to be a general contractor, actually don't have to be licensed at all. There are no building codes that these tiny houses have to adhere to and you can pretty much build them on anything and in anyway you want. The show portrays these hapless tiny house dreamers as people that want to be able to "pick up and go "whenever they want. It shows young families, big families, all walks of people wanting to escape the trappings of a mortgage and you look at some of these people and half the time you can tell they probably couldn't handle a regular job anyway. They have an unrealistic idea of what being a grown-up is all about. Every time we watch the shows we go back to the same thing, go out and buy yourself A new, or previously owned travel trailer for a fraction of the cost and try and live in it. Those travel trailer manufacturers have been in that business a long time, they know how to make things work in a small space and in a way that can handle the rigors of being towed across the country. You could also go into any RV shop and get parts for it or go to a camping world and buy all kinds of things when you were living in a trailer full time because that's really what these tiny houses are anyway. The next issue is how are you going to pay for it? Are there any lenders out there that loan on these things? It's really just personal property and it's going to depreciate just like a car for an RV or travel trailer. And how long is the thing going to last? Two years before they get tired of it ? Three years before it starts having issues? Five years before it sold for scrap or parts?
And the reality is that you just can't park these things anywhere. You're going to have to find someone with land you can put it on because most cities have ordinances against it. I suppose you could put it in an RV park. That's great, and to your family starts growing or your kids want to go play outside and then what are you going to do? Have them ride their bikes down the strip of concrete. So I am sure that I will get beat up for this post, of course these are my own personal views. I would rather live in a modest house where I can get financing if necessary, has the potential to go up in value, and has all of the creature comfort's that most of us when we think about it really need and want
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Old 06-03-2017, 09:51 AM
 
Location: Idaho
2,476 posts, read 2,013,442 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ralph_Kirk View Post
I question their physical longevity, especially if they're treated as "mobile" as the purchasers dream of. Moving a building of conventional home construction is hard on the structure, and watching theses "tiny home" programs, I'm not seeing anything other than conventional construction. Starts, stops, and turns induce stresses the construction is not designed to withstand. Mobile homes--which are still not expected to be moved more than once or twice in their lifetimes--are even then designed for movement.


The value proposition of these homes is totally different from a conventional house on a lot--the resale value will only decrease like the purchase of a car or a mobile home.
What I have always wondered. How will they hold up to the roads in some US cities such as Detroit, Chicago, LA that have pot (chuck?) holes the size of a Yugo. Hit a few of those at 55 and I can see the closet, cabinet doors found on the floor and as being conventional home construction, there are not STEEL frames underneath.

What they need is a follow up show to the small home after the couple has a few kids and see how long they lasted.
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Old 06-03-2017, 09:52 AM
 
25,801 posts, read 49,685,561 times
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As a student attending CAL Berkeley my brother lived in a very old 20' trailer and then had the chance to move up to luxury of a 5th wheel that was luxury... had a washer/dryer and small bath tub, bedroom, table, tile counters... etc.

He lived in the 5th wheel for 5 years and sold it for almost what he had paid.

The trailer was parked on a ranch high in the Oakland Hills where he worked the weekend shift to support himself going to college... his mode of transportation was a motorcycle which worked very well in the congested Bay Area... while his friends were piling on student debt he lived well and avoided debt by working his way through University.

Still remember the BBQ he would host after finals... tucked in the redwoods.

Tiny Houses have always been with us and just about every corner of the country had trailer parks that predate the double and triple wides and modulars...

It was the perfect setting for student housing and came with a million dollar view...

My first home purchase was a cottage built in 1910... it was 600 square feet on a 25 x 100 lot.

Living room, kitchen, full bath and two tiny bedrooms... one was 7' wide and the other 7.5' wide... in NEVER felt claustrophobic and was really all a single person could need... even a couple with an infant.
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Old 06-03-2017, 10:03 AM
 
17,892 posts, read 9,831,212 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by f5fstop View Post
What I have always wondered. How will they hold up to the roads in some US cities such as Detroit, Chicago, LA that have pot (chuck?) holes the size of a Yugo. Hit a few of those at 55 and I can see the closet, cabinet doors found on the floor and as being conventional home construction, there are not STEEL frames underneath.

What they need is a follow up show to the small home after the couple has a few kids and see how long they lasted.
Even normal movement is "extreme" for a house of normal construction. Even taking a slow start from a light will twist the house rearward, which is going to pull nails and shift joints. Then when you make even a slow stop, it's going to twist the house in the other direction. Same with turns. It's like hitting a house with a wind hard enough to make it lean a bit, first one direction then the opposite direction.

Take opposite corners wooden picture frame in your hands and push and pull them in opposite directions to see what's happening.
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