U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Real Estate
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
View Poll Results: Crawl space or slab
Crawl space 41 58.57%
Slab 29 41.43%
Voters: 70. You may not vote on this poll

Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 09-17-2017, 04:18 PM
 
7 posts, read 3,533 times
Reputation: 22

Advertisements

I have a two story wood framed home with slab floor in a hot place and its amazing how it can be 68 degrees downstairs when its 100 outside.
no A/c here and upstairs gets 86 while its 68 one flight down.
Less chance of house "walking" off its cripple walls in a big quake. Cripple wall is a short wall foundation some homes have to raise floor level about 2-3ft. Needs LOTS more earthquake prevention such as bolts and metal braces. Also, crawl spaces are a place for water to hang out/critters/spiders but is great for adding plumbing later or heating ducts, elec.etc
I say go SLAB if you can. make sure they really prep ground correctly and drill down to bedrock if a drilled foundation (slab) is called for.The new moisture barriers are way better than in past.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 09-17-2017, 06:17 PM
 
888 posts, read 757,791 times
Reputation: 1999
Keep in mind that a slab will eliminate about half your ability to do any future piping, sewer, electric.........

50 yrs building trades
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-17-2017, 07:50 PM
 
Location: Warren, OH
2,733 posts, read 3,228,216 times
Reputation: 6379
Didn't vote. I like a basement.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-17-2017, 07:59 PM
 
Location: Pahoa Hawaii
2,082 posts, read 4,628,846 times
Reputation: 2758
As you get older you would notice your legs, feet, back, etc. will not bother you so much on a wood floor opposed to a slab, and wood is much more forgiving than concrete if you fall.

Last edited by leilaniguy; 09-17-2017 at 08:50 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-17-2017, 11:18 PM
 
Location: No Coordinates Found
1,236 posts, read 443,072 times
Reputation: 783
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yippeekayay View Post
I haven't. All houses with basements where I live are on uneven lots and I prefer level lots.
I don't think a "level lot" exists. I think I know what you're saying, but the odds that they are totally "level" are unlikely. This is just as true as the four walls in your home never ever exactly equal a square.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-18-2017, 03:30 AM
 
Location: Southern California
4,371 posts, read 5,093,818 times
Reputation: 2145
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yippeekayay View Post
The thing with crawl space is on houses I looked, portions of floor creaked.
A friend went under his house and screwed in wood between the joist under the squeaking area to give the flooring more support. The problems went area.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-18-2017, 03:37 AM
 
Location: Eugene, Oregon
8,042 posts, read 2,554,606 times
Reputation: 11290
Quote:
Originally Posted by kokonutty View Post
Please advise the name of the plumber who installed the system that never needed attention in half a century.

Our plumbing was copper and was installed by a plumber who was a friend, with my dad working with him. There was never the slightest trouble under the house with the plumbing or heating ducts. All the metalwork in the house was installed by my dad's brother, who had just retired as a metalwork contractor. He brought a truck with metal stock and equipment and made it all on-site. He even dug five, 60-foot long drain-field ditches for the downspout drainage.

The only plumbing leak came outside the house, where the water intake pipe was positioned right below a gap between two drain-field tiles. Over a 45 year period, they dripped the slightly acid water from a maple tree onto it and two small pinholes opened up. But the leaking, pressurized water went right back up into the gap in the tiles and dispersed down the line, never showing any signs of a leak above ground. I dug up 30 feet of a concrete patio, trying to find the leak, without success. But I finally found it, by putting my ear to the ground all along above the buried pipe and was able to hear it blasting out of those holes. The only way I knew there was a leak in the first place, was that our pump ran three times as often as it had before and ran even when no water had been used.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-18-2017, 05:29 AM
 
Location: Port Charlotte FL
973 posts, read 564,208 times
Reputation: 2740
crawl space is wasted space to me..not to mention it's almost unusable for storage..and forget trying to get around in there once you get older..my last house had a crawl space..never again..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-18-2017, 07:43 AM
 
Location: NW PA
387 posts, read 908,052 times
Reputation: 367
I like the solid feeling of a slab (hate any floor bounce), but as said you most definitely don't want to have any issues that require busting it up.

I flat out hate crawl spaces, especially low, damp, nasty ones. I have installed well pumps, pressure tanks, added insulation, and repaired structural components in crawl spaces, and don't want to ever buy another home with one... I actually set that as a deal-breaker term, when searching for a new home. I'm a 100% basement fella, and although they sure can and do have potentially serious and costly issues, I'd rather deal with them over a traditional crawl any day.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-18-2017, 08:25 AM
 
7,880 posts, read 11,369,586 times
Reputation: 10177
Quote:
Originally Posted by leilaniguy View Post
As you get older you would notice your legs, feet, back, etc. will not bother you so much on a wood floor opposed to a slab, and wood is much more forgiving than concrete if you fall.
OMG this is so true. Figured this out the hard way. I'm in a serious search for a house in a low inventory market gone wild area and its taking months longer than I planned. That said I still won't consider a slab. (Or any multi level, you get both constant stairs and bugs in the half basement living space worst design ever!)

Any foundation can have issues. Crawl spaces, yes, can have critters and bugs. But I knew a woman who's ranch that had been built in a development that must have once been a swamp. She was on a slab but no matter how dedicated she was about addressing any kind of crack (yes slabs crack) she would get HUGE water spiders in the house. She has done every kind of mitigation for wetness that can be thought of all around her foundatiion, yard. Still happens.
I live on a slab now and I can feel some sort of big dirt lump under the carpet. Ants? IDK I haven't seen any. Also (totally different state) since the slab is no kidding ground level I get wolf spiders moving in the fall.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Real Estate
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top