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View Poll Results: Crawl space or slab
Crawl space 41 56.94%
Slab 31 43.06%
Voters: 72. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 09-18-2017, 09:15 AM
 
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There was a previous post on this not too long ago.

Slab vs Crawspace is really most dependent on the architecture of the home you want to buy or build as well as the type of soil you have on your lot.

If you want a Victorian style home you are going to be on a crawlspace. If you want a Craftsman style home you are going to be on a crawl space. If you want a Georgian, or a Ranch style home, then you are going to be on a slab foundation. In Texas where I am, the vast majority of the largest homes are on slabs, not crawlspace....you see very few 6,000+ sqft homes on crawlspace stye foundations.

Your soil also dictates the type of foundation. Especially when it comes to slabs. Many of the problems with slabs, and the plumbing that is installed in a slab (which is typically only the drains and kitchen islands) are caused by people building the wrong type of slab for the soil on their lot. When it comes to slabs, you have many options...just to name a few you have post tension, slab on grade, slab on beam, pier/beam....etc, etc, etc....

In the poor soil in Houston the most expensive homes typically use a slab with pier/beam system....that would be piers drilled below the water level to stable ground, a 3-6' bell bottom, rebar reinforced, and poured concrete...those would then be tied to grade beams that are heavily reinforced rebar, and then a typical rebar foundation tied to that. Basically its a heavily reinforced crawlspace style home set on the ground...typically built up to prevent flooding with select fill. The idea is that the soil below could wash out, and the house would remain undamaged. This method of construction is by far the most expensive type of foundation you can build, its also the least problematic.
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Old 09-18-2017, 10:04 AM
 
Location: Columbia, SC
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Location will dictate how houses must be built or have been built in certain climates so it may skew your poll. I voted slab assuming a flat lot. I've owned both.
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Old 09-18-2017, 10:07 AM
 
7,881 posts, read 11,381,426 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marksmu View Post
There was a previous post on this not too long ago.

Slab vs Crawspace is really most dependent on the architecture of the home you want to buy or build as well as the type of soil you have on your lot.

If you want a Victorian style home you are going to be on a crawlspace. If you want a Craftsman style home you are going to be on a crawl space. If you want a Georgian, or a Ranch style home, then you are going to be on a slab foundation. In Texas where I am, the vast majority of the largest homes are on slabs, not crawlspace....you see very few 6,000+ sqft homes on crawlspace stye foundations.

Your soil also dictates the type of foundation. Especially when it comes to slabs. Many of the problems with slabs, and the plumbing that is installed in a slab (which is typically only the drains and kitchen islands) are caused by people building the wrong type of slab for the soil on their lot. When it comes to slabs, you have many options...just to name a few you have post tension, slab on grade, slab on beam, pier/beam....etc, etc, etc....

In the poor soil in Houston the most expensive homes typically use a slab with pier/beam system....that would be piers drilled below the water level to stable ground, a 3-6' bell bottom, rebar reinforced, and poured concrete...those would then be tied to grade beams that are heavily reinforced rebar, and then a typical rebar foundation tied to that. Basically its a heavily reinforced crawlspace style home set on the ground...typically built up to prevent flooding with select fill. The idea is that the soil below could wash out, and the house would remain undamaged. This method of construction is by far the most expensive type of foundation you can build, its also the least problematic.
Not true for many places in the Midwest. I grew up in an old 2 story and then 2 ranches all on basements in Michigan. Everyone I knew had a basement. I've lived in 3 states since then and find it weird and frustrating when houses dont' have basements. Just not what I was used to. Where I am in SW Ohio its about half and half. You can tell by price which have them and which don't. Basement prices are usually 20,000 to 30,000 higher than a similar house without.
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Old 09-18-2017, 10:27 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Giesela View Post
Not true for many places in the Midwest. I grew up in an old 2 story and then 2 ranches all on basements in Michigan. Everyone I knew had a basement. I've lived in 3 states since then and find it weird and frustrating when houses dont' have basements. Just not what I was used to. Where I am in SW Ohio its about half and half. You can tell by price which have them and which don't. Basement prices are usually 20,000 to 30,000 higher than a similar house without.
You are correct. Many places in Texas can't have a basement though...our water table is too high.
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Old 09-18-2017, 10:35 AM
 
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Slab. I've lived in places with various kinds of critters getting into crawl spaces, including skunks, pack rats, mice, chipmunks, and who knows what else. They all stink when they (a) poop or (b) die.
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Old 09-18-2017, 02:13 PM
 
Location: Raleigh
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yippeekayay View Post
Isn't basement just a portion of the house? Otherwise it is called ground level. So the non-basement portion of the house would either be on crawl space or slab.


And that basement portion also has a foundation underneath it right?
Where I grew up (Chicago suburbs) as well as where I lived post college everything had a basement. It has to do with the soils, what kind of foundation you need or can get away with. Even small, inexpensively built houses have basements; I can't think of a home that didn't have one.

So, a lot of it has to do with where you live. I don't think you could build a house in Eastern North Carolina, for example, that had a basement. Around Raleigh, they are scarce but it depends on your lot; they're common on not-so-flat lots.
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Old 09-18-2017, 02:50 PM
 
Location: Wasilla, AK
6,539 posts, read 3,594,741 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marksmu View Post
If you want a Victorian style home you are going to be on a crawlspace. If you want a Craftsman style home you are going to be on a crawl space. If you want a Georgian, or a Ranch style home, then you are going to be on a slab foundation. In Texas where I am, the vast majority of the largest homes are on slabs, not crawlspace....you see very few 6,000+ sqft homes on crawlspace stye foundations.
Virtually every ranch style house in my part of Alaska has a crawl space. That includes mine, which was built in 2015. Same with most other homes. Crawl space is by far the most common.
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Old 09-19-2017, 09:55 AM
 
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Crawl space. I have an old adobe home with an approximate 3 - 4 ft crawl space. When I first bought the house years ago, I just kept throwing those canned bug bombs under the house. Now, I have no bugs, snakes, etc. I have no problem crawling around under the house and I'm a girl!


Crawl spaces are great because you can get to the plumbing, some electrical, gas lines, etc when you need to repair/replace.
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Old 09-19-2017, 12:31 PM
 
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A crawl space has a few benefits, easier plumbing access and it will be higher up in case of flooding.
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Old 09-20-2017, 02:24 PM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rational1 View Post
Crawl spaces give me the willies. Spiderwebs, insects, and worse.
I spent some time in mine recently working on the dryer vent duct. Yes, lots of spiders and webs, but it's nice to have that access to the plumbing, heating and underside of floors. I spend as little time there as possible, but am grateful that it's deep enough that I can sit up in many areas. i wouldn't want to have to do any kind of modifications involving plumbing in a home with slab, requiring a jack hammer.
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