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Old 11-25-2017, 02:29 PM
 
3,285 posts, read 6,493,985 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Moonlady View Post
We left a minimal amount of things that I would have wanted if I were a buyer - a small shelf in the garage, a wooden silverware tray in the kitchen drawer, the curtain rods we took down for the showing (they were fairly new and good quality), a concrete bird bath and a large potting table on the side of the house. We were supposed to close on Tuesday and got a call on Monday morning to come remove everything. But that wasn't the worst of it. There had been a hail storm over the weekend and the very large driveway was full of leaf debris from the storm and they wanted it all removed before closing! My poor realtor was out there trying to sweep the leaves - an impossible task. We borrowed my neighbor's extension cords, blew the leaves off the driveway and packed up everything that wasn't attached. It was a rather unpleasant finish to a stressful sale.
So you wanted to leave the impossible task to the people who didn't even own the home when the hail storm occurred?
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Old 11-25-2017, 03:09 PM
 
Location: S.W. Florida
878 posts, read 305,914 times
Reputation: 2334
When we bought our house last fall the previous owner left behind a lot of stuff. I had to get rid of 12 partial cans of paint, a ton of partially filled bottles of various chemicals and cleaners(some which were unlabeled)and I donít remember what else. Oh, and they left me a non working ceiling fan that stopped working after the home inspection. And the hot water heater went kaput one month after closing. But I digress.....

I would have loved to have been left a riding mower. Thatís something I could use!
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Old 11-25-2017, 03:21 PM
Status: "Just another day" (set 7 days ago)
 
Location: Jollyville, TX
3,466 posts, read 8,581,181 times
Reputation: 3273
Quote:
Originally Posted by MurphyPl1 View Post
So you wanted to leave the impossible task to the people who didn't even own the home when the hail storm occurred?
To be fair, it was only leaves. We hadn't lived there in close to 3 years and the house was vacant. It's not like there were tree limbs down or damage- just a bunch of leaves. Sorry, but I thought that was unreasonable.

Edited to add, the only reason it was impossible was because the driveway was very big - we were on a cut-de-sac and sweeping was not an option (which is what my realtor was trying to do). The leaf blower took care of the problem but since we weren't living there, we had to borrow extension cords to get the entire driveway. It took less than an hour using the blower.
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Old 11-25-2017, 05:34 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in America
11,309 posts, read 8,615,859 times
Reputation: 18095
Quote:
Originally Posted by fluffythewondercat View Post
Do you ever wonder what some buyers are thinking?

Ours want to close soon but before that they want us to remove the "junk" we left behind.

The "junk" is a couple of small rolls of leftover carpet. The carpet in the house is new. Another piece of "junk" is the late-model lawn mower we thoughtfully (or so it seemed) left for them.

When I heard about this from our agent, I said, "OK. They're either new homeowners or they're crazy."

Every dwelling I have ever purchased has come with extra carpet for patching damaged areas. But hey, whatever. We put new sod in the front and back yards. It is thick and lush. Sure hope they're going to hire a lawn service. Or maybe they'll save money by not watering it.

I know, not my problem.
I wouldn't want your left over carpet or old lawn mower. How do you know the buyers needed or wanted your old lawn mower? You don't. When you move, you take your stuff with you or you dispose of it. Don't make it someone else's problem.

I've never bought a house where the left over carpeting was left behind. I would have told the sellers to take it with them. Not everyone loves carpet. I yank out carpeting as fast as I can!
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Old 11-25-2017, 06:27 PM
 
14,171 posts, read 14,254,463 times
Reputation: 19237
Quote:
Originally Posted by luv4horses View Post
Problem is, what happens when the sale falls through at the last moment? Here you removed the swing set, recycled the paint, threw out the hot tub, whatever. Now you need to re-advertise and do some touch up, but alas, all your stuff is gone.

And have you ever tried to take a paint chip from the bedroom wall so you could color match? Not likely.

But generally, I agree. Nobody wants your leftovers, probably not your paint, pots, or fertilizers.
You usually have a few days after closing to move out. You can also give a concession or set up a appointment for a cleaning company to come in after and do the removal.
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Old 11-25-2017, 09:00 PM
 
Location: West Madison^WMHT
2,784 posts, read 2,215,689 times
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Post Want stuff gone before closing is pretty standard, if sometimes petty

I've seen a couple of instances where the buyers wanted the seller to have (clean, nicely racked) hardwood gone by closing. Most recently, five full cords of seasoned oak.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Electrician4you View Post
You usually have a few days after closing to move out.
Only if specifically agreed to.

I've lived in 4 different states, in every one the standard was for the seller to be completely moved out, the house to be move-in-ready on the morning of closing, if not the day before for a final "walk through".
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Old 11-25-2017, 09:17 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in America
11,309 posts, read 8,615,859 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Electrician4you View Post
You usually have a few days after closing to move out. You can also give a concession or set up a appointment for a cleaning company to come in after and do the removal.
This depends on your state. In NY, the buyer takes possession and owns the house immediately upon closing. We do walk throughs before closing and the house is supposed to be empty. Once closing takes place, it's now the buyer's house. The seller's stuff should be long gone unless you have an addendum stating otherwise.
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Old 11-25-2017, 10:36 PM
 
Location: Tennessee at last!
1,613 posts, read 1,330,603 times
Reputation: 3007
Quote:
Originally Posted by Electrician4you View Post
You usually have a few days after closing to move out. You can also give a concession or set up a appointment for a cleaning company to come in after and do the removal.
I have bought and sold houses in PA, AZ, CA and TN. NONE of those states gave you extra time to move out after closing unless you negotiated in the contract and most buyers wanted in the house and the buyers out at the time of closing.

The house I just sold in CA had in the contract for the house to be empty 5 days prior to closing for the walk through. At that walk through the buyer decided they wanted a new swing set, not in the contract at all except to say it was included in the sell and cemented to the ground.

So in my case I had to be out 5 days before the sell recorded. And the buyer took possession immediately after recording.
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Old 11-25-2017, 11:20 PM
 
349 posts, read 75,898 times
Reputation: 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sherifftruman View Post
That would be a pretty shady inspector if they really changed their findings in the report in the way you are saying. It would be practically unheard of for someone to even communicate that there are certain things they don’t want in the home. Now, obviously the seller and agent have walked through the house and seen it, and if they have noticed a crack or a water stain it isn’t unusual for them to say hey, I’m concerned about X, but your job as a home inspector is to report the facts you find in the home, nothing more. Sometimes that means reassuring the buyer that the crack is simply normal drywall issues and sometimes you end up finding something far worse than anyone inspected.
Hi Sherifftruman,

I wholeheartedly disagree that it would have to be a "shady" inspector, as I never implied that they would have to "change their findings" either.

I simply tried to give a reasonable explanation to Lae60, who had already stated that buyers had comeback on them for gas log debris after inspections.

Perhaps you might offer a better explanation as to why this happened?

The way I've seen it, buyers will often walk around talking over issues with their inspector, and the buyer usually has more time to mull over most visible items than the inspector does.

This means if the buyer had enough time to think the fireplace thing over, they could very well express to their inspector their "concerns" regarding the very trashy and scraggly fireplace embers.

As an expert, relatively speaking, I can surely guarantee you that no decent inspector in their right mind will give any kind of factual information regarding the questionable embers, as those types of materials will often be "trade secret" materials, and it would be impossible for an inspector to give a solid scientific analysis of the materials at hand within the allotted time frame of the inspection.

Therefor, a wise inspector should remain very neutral regarding such potentially foreign and not-well understood materials.

IOW, the buyers concerns that the "fake embers" may be something else, would be very difficult, if not impossible for most licensed inspectors to prove otherwise.

Also, it would be unwise to tell any buyer that a crack in the drywall is "normal" as that may very well not be the case.

It's better to say that the crack "may or may not be normal, and needs further investigation by a structural engineer/ and or HVAC specialist to determine whether or not extensive repairs are necessary"

In my professional opinion, cracks in the drywall are usually a sign of multiple problems that will need need addressed if such cracking is to be remedied.

Major structure problems and/or insufficient air conditioning are usually the main culprits regarding drywall cracks, and neither of which are simple or cheap fixes.

Last edited by riggy_house; 11-25-2017 at 11:30 PM..
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Old 11-25-2017, 11:24 PM
 
4,758 posts, read 3,148,129 times
Reputation: 12331
Quote:
Originally Posted by riggy_house View Post
Hi Sherifftruman,

I disagree that it would have to be a "shady" inspector, as I never implied that they would have to "change their findings" either.

I simply tried to give a reasonable explanation to Lae60, who had already stated that buyers had comeback on them for gas log debris after inspections.

Perhaps you might offer a better explanation as to why this happened?

The way I've seen it, buyers will often walk around talking over issues with their inspector, and the buyer usually has more time to mull on most visible issues than the inspector does.

This means if the buyer had enough time to think the fireplace thing over, they could very well express to their inspector their "concerns" regarding the very trashy and scraggly fireplace embers.

As an expert, relatively speaking, I can surely guarantee you that no decent inspector in their right mind will give any kind of factual information regarding the questionable embers, as those types of materials will often be "trade secret" materials, and it would be impossible for an inspector to give a solid scientific analysis of the materials at hand within the allotted time frame of the inspection.

Therefor, a wise inspector should remain very neutral regarding such potentially foreign and not-well understood materials.

IOW, the buyers concerns that the "fake embers" may be something else, would be very difficult, if not impossible for most licensed inspectors to prove otherwise.

Also, it would be unwise to tell any buyer that a crack in the drywall is "normal" as that may very well not be the case.

It's better to say that the crack "may or may not be normal, and needs further investigation by a structural engineer/ and or HVAC specialist to determine whether or not extensive repairs are necessary"

In my professional opinion, cracks in the drywall are usually a sign of multiple problems that will need need addressed if such cracking is to be remedied.

Major structure problems and/or inefficient air conditioning are usually the main culprits regarding drywall cracks, and neither of which are simple or cheap fixes.
wut?
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