U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Real Estate
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 01-28-2018, 10:31 AM
 
446 posts, read 568,590 times
Reputation: 936

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Laowai View Post
However, the bedroom locations/sizes and current 1-car garage would be a deal breaker for this native New Englander.

No one's raised the home heating. Perhaps I'm way off the mark, but the antique iron & seemingly dated baseboard radiators caught my attention. For example, I wondered how well the house is insulated, potential for it to cost a gold mine to heat, wondered how much "Continuously renovated" applied to the heating, and pondered what would need to be invested to bring the HVAC to reasonable 2018 standards.

If not absolutely satisfied with the realtor him/herself, perhaps he/she is also part of the challenge. Regardless, good luck to the OP!
--Plus, oil heat, with the tank in the basement (or wherever)--not a positive. Is nat. gas often used in Hingham?

--How's the roof? Imagine putting a new roof on that place!

--Septic. That's normal in some areas; but a lot of high (or low) income people in Mass. won't want to deal with that.

--What's the basement like? Is it going to seem "creepy" to modern buyers?

--The dated kitchen. And a lot of the downstairs looks impressive, but a bit worn, needs new paint & flooring perhaps. The 1 car garage, & the kind of "discombobulated" nature of the property.

--I know from living in Lexington for years, buyers in that price range just want "move in" condition, at least, trophy kitchen, new everything, etc. (Altho that might cost you $1.7 now for a brand new McMansion)--& you'd be way, way closer to Boston. I don't want to use the term "White Elephant" for this place--I think that's too strong--but most buyers may figure at least $200-$300K plus in costs to renovate.....& why not just buy a place that's already the way they want it?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-29-2018, 05:57 AM
 
10,608 posts, read 13,397,132 times
Reputation: 17163
Quote:
Originally Posted by KJMoves View Post
MLS states "Heat Zones: 3 Hot Water Baseboard, Hot Water Radiators, Steam, Oil". Also states hot water is heated via electric.
No, not in the link the OP provided.

At least I don't see it, in the 20 or so times I've read it.


But there is a lot of yakkety- y a k about "custom appointments throughout. Beautiful two story foyer" albeit she chopped off the photo so you can't even see that "beautiful two story foyer".

But thanks for proving my point about buyers and quality of some realtors.

Hopefully potential buyers are all local and just make the right guess since the realtor didn't even bother to list HEATING AT ALL - if the boiler is heated by gas, oil, or electricity - in the link the OP provided.

Or maybe they'll run across this article educating them like I found after many searches now the the lingo has been clarified (lingo missing from the listing LOL):

9 Pros and Cons of Using Hot Water Baseboard Heaters

Also, BTW the listing has it priced at 1.530K, not 1.3 which was stated upthread. And it's a current listing since it starts out telling people that the house will be re-listed in the spring. Another confusing "strategy".

Maybe I'm just too picky about what I expect from my realtor handling my $1.6 Million dollars.

Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-29-2018, 06:35 AM
 
10,608 posts, read 13,397,132 times
Reputation: 17163
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2houses.oh.no View Post
Would you list and market it as 5 bedroom antique home with newer 1 bedroom in-law apartment as opposed to 6 bedroom home?

Carriage house or barn?
As a buyer, I'd totally prefer the in-law apartment marketing versus 6 bedroom.

Also it depends on the official language of how your county records it to avoid a buyer thinking you were trying to be clever. That can be tricky with historic properties.

The Public Records on your listing in the link you provided state 4 bedrooms.

I had an agent try and list my mother's home as a 4 bedroom by including her THREE SEASON PORCH! LOL. (ironically with baseboard heat).

The county clearly had it at 3 bedrooms and nobody in their right mind would consider her formerly screened in- all glass porch stuck onto the back of her house - to be a bedroom.

I would suggest you research the language used in your region for the Carriage House versus Barn. I said Carriage House because that's what it is in historic Bucks County, PA. When it has living quarters. We say Carriage House if it was historic and formerly a "barn" and now has living quarters....unless there are stalls, for example, or large unfinished spaces downstairs ready to accommodate "barn" needs.

But reading the language of your listing : "Work from home or enjoy additional space in the 2 level barn with full bath that offers over 2,000 sq ft." maybe it's not LIVING quarters but just a bathroom?

I assumed the in-law apartment was in there.

The listing is confusing to me.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-29-2018, 06:35 AM
 
Location: Medford, MA
101 posts, read 66,678 times
Reputation: 236
Quote:
Originally Posted by runswithscissors View Post
No, not in the link the OP provided.
Sorry, but it's not a "current listing", as it's not showing the listing data as it was last represented in MLS when it was cancelled on 1/22. That price of $1,531,100 is an estimate by Realtor.com (their version of a Zess-timate). Also the info below "Property Details" states clearly that it's coming from Public Records, not any previous listing.

The description I gave was pasted directly from the listing in MLS as it was on the day it was cancelled, at a price of $1,349,000.

Last edited by KJMoves; 01-29-2018 at 06:37 AM.. Reason: Added Quote
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-29-2018, 11:20 AM
 
30 posts, read 27,556 times
Reputation: 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by runswithscissors View Post
I would suggest you research the language used in your region for the Carriage House versus Barn. I said Carriage House because that's what it is in historic Bucks County, PA. When it has living quarters. We say Carriage House if it was historic and formerly a "barn" and now has living quarters....unless there are stalls, for example, or large unfinished spaces downstairs ready to accommodate "barn" needs.

But reading the language of your listing : "Work from home or enjoy additional space in the 2 level barn with full bath that offers over 2,000 sq ft." maybe it's not LIVING quarters but just a bathroom?

I assumed the in-law apartment was in there.

The listing is confusing to me.
The barn is a post and beam structure that does not have any stalls in it. The stalls , which have been removed, were located to the left of the barn, where the current one-car garage is located now. So what's left is a garage attached to a main building that is finished on the first floor and includes an older bathroom, not offensive, but old. it works fine. This structure has NO HEAT and the pipes have to be drained in the winter, water shut off. So in order to be used year round = $$$$.

The previous owner had a business there year round for 5 years until it outgrew the space and she moved it to an industrial space in Hingham. During use the space had a propane heater inside and a tank outside which have since been removed. Insulation is unknown. Windows are old. There is a rigid insulation panel that was used to block off the second floor in the winter and keep the heat inside.

At the back end of the garage is a kitchen area consisting of a built in sink on a work/storage table and an old fridge. The walls on that end of the garage are finished with pickled barnboards. I would not call it a "cabana" or a pool house.

How would you state it in the listing that ACCURATELY represents the barn/carriage house, and kitchen area next to the pool? I think buyers seeing the word cabana would assume a tricked out Pinterest worthy structure that was completely finished and new, which it is not.

The APARTMENT is the addition on the left side of the main house with the pointed roof. It looks small, but it's actually pretty big, 1000 s.f. It consists of a bedroom, full bath, and main living/dining area with a wet bar and small fridge behind closet doors. It has it's own heating zones. It's about 20 years old and has the right windows and finishing.

How would you best describe this set-up so it's not overstated or understated but let's interested buyers know exactly what to expect and not be disappointed? I don't think the listing represented the actual property. My gut feeling is that presenting it as a single family home with 6 bedrooms didn't work since it hasn't sold.

It is off-market now. We may relist in the spring or rent it out for a while. The last listing price was $1,350,000. as previous poster stated.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-29-2018, 11:47 AM
 
5,469 posts, read 6,137,743 times
Reputation: 13992
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2houses.oh.no View Post
The barn is a post and beam structure that does not have any stalls in it. The stalls , which have been removed, were located to the left of the barn, where the current one-car garage is located now. So what's left is a garage attached to a main building that is finished on the first floor and includes an older bathroom, not offensive, but old. it works fine. This structure has NO HEAT and the pipes have to be drained in the winter, water shut off. So in order to be used year round = $$$$.

The previous owner had a business there year round for 5 years until it outgrew the space and she moved it to an industrial space in Hingham. During use the space had a propane heater inside and a tank outside which have since been removed. Insulation is unknown. Windows are old. There is a rigid insulation panel that was used to block off the second floor in the winter and keep the heat inside.

At the back end of the garage is a kitchen area consisting of a built in sink on a work/storage table and an old fridge. The walls on that end of the garage are finished with pickled barnboards. I would not call it a "cabana" or a pool house.

How would you state it in the listing that ACCURATELY represents the barn/carriage house, and kitchen area next to the pool? I think buyers seeing the word cabana would assume a tricked out Pinterest worthy structure that was completely finished and new, which it is not.

The APARTMENT is the addition on the left side of the main house with the pointed roof. It looks small, but it's actually pretty big, 1000 s.f. It consists of a bedroom, full bath, and main living/dining area with a wet bar and small fridge behind closet doors. It has it's own heating zones. It's about 20 years old and has the right windows and finishing.

How would you best describe this set-up so it's not overstated or understated but let's interested buyers know exactly what to expect and not be disappointed? I don't think the listing represented the actual property. My gut feeling is that presenting it as a single family home with 6 bedrooms didn't work since it hasn't sold.

It is off-market now. We may relist in the spring or rent it out for a while. The last listing price was $1,350,000. as previous poster stated.



I think you or someone used the word "awkward".. The whole thing is kind of a mess, or unique, depending on how you look at it.


Personally, I sort of like it.


But, it really is choppy...a little space here, a kitchen there, some office space here, some bedrooms over there, a pool here, behind a barn there, some baseboard radiators here, some cast iron radiators over there. It really doesn't "flow" in any sense of the property.


It will appeal to a limited number of buyers who, as we see from the way spec builders do their work, have simpleton tastes.


Throw in a cookie cutter home, with crown molding, granite, and a wall paper border, and the buyers swarm in.


Your place just doesn't earn points with that crowd,


I wonder what the basement looks like? With all of those various systems, I am guessing it is a bit of a hodge podge.


So, as many have pointed out, much needs to be addressed. Or not.


Get some good pictures done. Maybe stage it for six months and see if that changes people's interest (a LOT of people have NO imagination as to what or how you can use all of that unique space) put it back on the market this spring. Don't monkey much with the price--you haven't actually seen a buyer, so price isn't yet the issue.


Good luck. I bet you find a buyer, get your price, and you'll be happy and the buyer will be happy. It's unique and takes a unique buyer.


P.S. Is your agent Coldwell Banker? "Log in to view"? That is an immediate "move on". If people don't want me to look, what is wrong????? Or are they simply being a PIA>


P.P.S Don't rent it. That is the kiss of death. Screams "it won't sell", and then the property begins a "rental" for sale, which means that is has been beaten/abused/used and has vibes no serious buyer wants to know about.

Last edited by Ted Bear; 01-29-2018 at 11:55 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-29-2018, 12:51 PM
 
Location: Needham, MA
6,325 posts, read 9,041,197 times
Reputation: 5324
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ted Bear View Post
Get some good pictures done. Maybe stage it for six months and see if that changes people's interest (a LOT of people have NO imagination as to what or how you can use all of that unique space) put it back on the market this spring. Don't monkey much with the price--you haven't actually seen a buyer, so price isn't yet the issue.
Usually, if you don't see any buyers and don't get any offers that's a sign that the price is too high. So, yes, price would be the problem in most of these situations. This being said, the general consensus among respondents to this post has been that there is significant room for improvement both in the marketing of the property (better photos, property description, etc.) and also in the in person appearance of the property (staging). If you've maximized the marketing and the appearance of the home then the only variable left is the price. You have to really know the market though in order to know if price is truly a problem. A house like this will take a while to sell if you the most money possible. There just aren't as many people who are looking for something like this compared to the 4 bedroom square box of a colonial in a developed neighborhood.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-29-2018, 01:31 PM
 
1,528 posts, read 728,653 times
Reputation: 2062
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2houses.oh.no View Post
The barn is a post and beam structure that does not have any stalls in it. The stalls , which have been removed, were located to the left of the barn, where the current one-car garage is located now. So what's left is a garage attached to a main building that is finished on the first floor and includes an older bathroom, not offensive, but old. it works fine. This structure has NO HEAT and the pipes have to be drained in the winter, water shut off. So in order to be used year round = $$$$.

The previous owner had a business there year round for 5 years until it outgrew the space and she moved it to an industrial space in Hingham. During use the space had a propane heater inside and a tank outside which have since been removed. Insulation is unknown. Windows are old. There is a rigid insulation panel that was used to block off the second floor in the winter and keep the heat inside.

At the back end of the garage is a kitchen area consisting of a built in sink on a work/storage table and an old fridge. The walls on that end of the garage are finished with pickled barnboards. I would not call it a "cabana" or a pool house.

How would you state it in the listing that ACCURATELY represents the barn/carriage house, and kitchen area next to the pool? I think buyers seeing the word cabana would assume a tricked out Pinterest worthy structure that was completely finished and new, which it is not.

The APARTMENT is the addition on the left side of the main house with the pointed roof. It looks small, but it's actually pretty big, 1000 s.f. It consists of a bedroom, full bath, and main living/dining area with a wet bar and small fridge behind closet doors. It has it's own heating zones. It's about 20 years old and has the right windows and finishing.

How would you best describe this set-up so it's not overstated or understated but let's interested buyers know exactly what to expect and not be disappointed? I don't think the listing represented the actual property. My gut feeling is that presenting it as a single family home with 6 bedrooms didn't work since it hasn't sold.

It is off-market now. We may relist in the spring or rent it out for a while. The last listing price was $1,350,000. as previous poster stated.

I'm not an agent so I don't have the best words and sorry if this sounds like problems rather than solutions.

I don't like 'apartment' for the 1000 sq foot space. It's very large for an inlaw apartment but it's not an apartment as it doesn't have even a basic kitchenette. I know it has a wet bar but that leaves it well short of an apartment but quite large if it's one person. In other words, it's not 'tidy' in layout and doesn't work presented as an apartment in my view. Really it's hard to say though if you're not seeing the actual house.

Perhaps call it an in-law 'suite' and make the default that it contains the ground floor bedroom and bathroom only. I would show the family room as part of a great space with the kitchen and breakfast room. I know this isn't a continuous space but make it flow / be open as much as possible and hopefully a buyer would see that it could be opened up around the fireplace to great a mostly open space. For me, that's perfect because it's open but not completely so. If the buyer is really keen on having a proper apartment, the agent can present the option of pairing the family room with the bedroom/bathroom to make a true apartment. I think that "inlaw suite" in the ad would get that niche to view it.

I still think that the barn is the biggest problem. I don't know about carriage house vs barn. Carriage house kind of means livable house in my view. It also means space that you need to do something with. Barn to me means just a space that you can put stuff in and use or not use as you wish. It shows as neither. I hate the term 'bonus' in housing but perhaps that gives a good way out. Something like:
"A lovely (converted?) antique barn provides a bonus space awaiting your hobbies, art projects, poolside parties, small business, or conversion to a poolside carriage house or cabana."
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-29-2018, 01:59 PM
 
329 posts, read 448,661 times
Reputation: 399
I really think the location is an issue. It sits on the corner of two busy streets and there are no sidewalks on Charles or Prospect. Plus it's close to the edge of town (near Norwell border). Just feels like if you have $1.4M to spend in Hingham, you'd probably want something on a side street with a sidewalk, something closer to shopping/restaurants or something near the water.

You know the house that is basically across the street from this house? 171 Prospect (again, right at the intersection of Prospect and Charles). You'll probably remember it was a smaller house that was bought by a flipper, gutted, expanded, then put back on the market as a brand-new 4,300 SF house listed for $1.25M in the summer of 2016. It sat on the market for 6 months and eventually sold for under $1M. I drive this route every single day and I think 210 Charles is a beautiful home, but the location is just tough.

I am surprised 206 Charles took so long to sell as well. An updated 2,300SF 4bd/2ba house for $779K in Hingham is not a bad deal, but it sat on the market for what, 4 months? I know it's pending now and am interested to see what the final sale price was.

Homes on Mast Hill, Saw Mill, and Maryknoll (all neighborhoods right off of Charles) rarely come on the market, but when they do they sell like hot cakes and they are in the $1M - $1.5M+ range. I have no doubt that if this house weren't directly on Charles and were instead in one of those neighborhoods literally hundreds of feet away, it would sell just fine.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-29-2018, 02:44 PM
 
30 posts, read 27,556 times
Reputation: 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by just_because View Post
I'm not an agent so I don't have the best words and sorry if this sounds like problems rather than solutions.

I don't like 'apartment' for the 1000 sq foot space. It's very large for an inlaw apartment but it's not an apartment as it doesn't have even a basic kitchenette. I know it has a wet bar but that leaves it well short of an apartment but quite large if it's one person. In other words, it's not 'tidy' in layout and doesn't work presented as an apartment in my view. Really it's hard to say though if you're not seeing the actual house.

Perhaps call it an in-law 'suite' and make the default that it contains the ground floor bedroom and bathroom only. I would show the family room as part of a great space with the kitchen and breakfast room. I know this isn't a continuous space but make it flow / be open as much as possible and hopefully a buyer would see that it could be opened up around the fireplace to great a mostly open space. For me, that's perfect because it's open but not completely so. If the buyer is really keen on having a proper apartment, the agent can present the option of pairing the family room with the bedroom/bathroom to make a true apartment. I think that "inlaw suite" in the ad would get that niche to view it.

I still think that the barn is the biggest problem. I don't know about carriage house vs barn. Carriage house kind of means livable house in my view. It also means space that you need to do something with. Barn to me means just a space that you can put stuff in and use or not use as you wish. It shows as neither. I hate the term 'bonus' in housing but perhaps that gives a good way out. Something like:
"A lovely (converted?) antique barn provides a bonus space awaiting your hobbies, art projects, poolside parties, small business, or conversion to a poolside carriage house or cabana."
Awesome...Great suggestions! Thank you so much for your input.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Real Estate
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top