U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Real Estate
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 05-06-2018, 11:53 AM
 
Location: Columbia SC
7,983 posts, read 6,739,855 times
Reputation: 10720

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by just_because View Post
Times change. Particularly in the Boston area, preferences have seemed to change to newer builds or complete modernization of older homes. Plenty of tech money from outside of New England. "Mixed marriages" (New Englander and non-New Englander) dilute old New England ways. Old frugal ways and acceptance of inconvenience has dwindled. Unlike many places in the country, New Englanders accepted quirky old things and held onto that for longer than the rest of the country. That defining characteristic is slipping away.

Old, wealthy families used to own beautiful summer homes on the Cape, Vineyard, Nantucket, etc with no air conditioning, perhaps no central heat, functional but simple old kitchens, old furniture and few conveniences - just a few old bikes and the beach. Yes these still exist but they are a dying breed. Either demolished or completely rebuilt and extended to create second homes that are as large and well appointed as their primary Wellesley or Weston homes. You see this in all expensive areas of the Cape and islands. And New Hampshire and Maine. Younger people don't even want their second homes to be old and quirky, never mind their primary homes. Not making value judgments about anyone, that's just the way it is.

I agree that few people today will want to live in a home like that without central air and since it's just expected, many people will have problems embarking on such a big and invasive project, just to get the place to meet what's now considered a basic need.
You hit the nail on the head.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-06-2018, 04:12 PM
 
Location: Chesapeake Bay
6,044 posts, read 3,642,096 times
Reputation: 3485
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2houses.oh.no View Post
Thanks for your comments and suggestions. At this point I think we're limited to dropping the price until it sells.

The positive comments of encouragement are much appreciated, especially from those who have been following along from the very beginning. We may go forward with professional staging if we don't have an offer soon.

There are contractors who have been back so many times on behalf of their buyers that I feel like they are personal friends of mine. At least 4-5 parties are circling but no one has made an offer, so it's down to price at this point.

Here we are opening the pool again! Oh well...
Just looking at this thread. It reminds me of the house I sold in NJ quite a few years ago. My house was older than yours and had some of the same issues that others have pointed out. Of course, these older homes do have lots of features that buyers want as well. Our house had a large lot, swimming pool, garage, etc just as yours does.

So we did all the work we thought was needed, talked to several agents, put it on the market. And it sat. And sat. And sat. Not one offer. So at Thanksgiving, we took it off the market, did a few more things to put it on the market after Christmas. But then I had an idea. The agent that we originally chose had experience selling houses but was it possible to find an agent who specialized only in selling older houses like ours? We asked around, checked sales of older homes in our area and finally found that person.

I have to admit, she was something else. The most abrasive sales person I have ever met. But she had been selling these older houses for more than 30 years, knew the market inside out. And knew what it took to sell a house like ours. She insisted we make some changes, do a few improvements, stage better (and you do need that very much. And better pictures), had a handyman come in for touch-ups. It took about a month of work before she was satisfied.

And then ... she sold the place in a couple of months. Her network of buyers who wanted older antique homes was phenomenal. Two prospective buyers even got in a bidding war, it was amazing.

in my opinion thats what you need to sell your place. A good agent who knows your specialized market-place.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-06-2018, 11:06 PM
 
Location: Columbia SC
7,983 posts, read 6,739,855 times
Reputation: 10720
My ex-wife would be all over that "cute" place. That is one reason she is my ex-wife. Friend in the car business said there is a$$ for every seat. Just got to find the right a$$.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-07-2018, 12:15 PM
 
1,343 posts, read 532,920 times
Reputation: 2318
Quote:
Originally Posted by just_because View Post
Times change. Particularly in the Boston area, preferences have seemed to change to newer builds or complete modernization of older homes. Plenty of tech money from outside of New England. "Mixed marriages" (New Englander and non-New Englander) dilute old New England ways. Old frugal ways and acceptance of inconvenience has dwindled. Unlike many places in the country, New Englanders accepted quirky old things and held onto that for longer than the rest of the country. That defining characteristic is slipping away.

Old, wealthy families used to own beautiful summer homes on the Cape, Vineyard, Nantucket, etc with no air conditioning, perhaps no central heat, functional but simple old kitchens, old furniture and few conveniences - just a few old bikes and the beach. Yes these still exist but they are a dying breed. Either demolished or completely rebuilt and extended to create second homes that are as large and well appointed as their primary Wellesley or Weston homes. You see this in all expensive areas of the Cape and islands. And New Hampshire and Maine. Younger people don't even want their second homes to be old and quirky, never mind their primary homes. Not making value judgments about anyone, that's just the way it is.

I agree that few people today will want to live in a home like that without central air and since it's just expected, many people will have problems embarking on such a big and invasive project, just to get the place to meet what's now considered a basic need.

True, but it differs from town to town. While in the town I grew up in, people are purchasing old capes and renovating them, they aren't doing them excessively into mega mansions; however, in towns like Needham these same capes are being purchased two lots at a time and being torn down and building one new mega mansion on both lots. It takes money to do that because even these old capes are going for $400K in my town and much higher in Needham. Buy two in Needham and that means you are putting close to a 2 million dollar house up.

I guess I have the quirky nieces and nephews because they like old. My niece bought a home in Quincy, 1940's style with pink bathrooms. You would think, and I thought, she would want them gone. Nope she loves the pink and when I saw them so did I. They are beautiful and original. Me, on the other hand, over the years my tastes have changed from New England country to new, modern clean uncluttered.

At the right price, this house will sell regardless of central air. I looked in the area at similar priced homes and half the homes had central air while the other half which were older homes like this didn't.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-03-2018, 11:03 AM
 
3,758 posts, read 2,914,842 times
Reputation: 11999
There was another price drop on 6/1, to $1,295,000 (cut 54k). It has been for sale now for over a year. I wonder if theres been any offers at all? What has the feedback been?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-03-2018, 05:33 PM
 
Location: East Coast
2,775 posts, read 1,580,906 times
Reputation: 4008
Quote:
Originally Posted by NorthofHere View Post
Your not from New England are you? This is common in Massachusetts/New England in homes that haven't been built in the last 20-25 years.

ETA: I see you are in South Carolina? So yeah I see where you are coming from. In Massachusetts you might have 10 days of the year where you really need a/c and not just open windows turn on ceiling fans. I grew up in Massachusetts, moved 27 years ago to South Carolina and now live in Florida. A/C is a necessity in SC and Florida.
At that price point, people are going to want A/C.

I'm in MA, and A/C is a necessity. I use it plenty between May and October, sometimes even in April. Now, there are stretches where one day I'm putting on the A/C and the next day I'm putting on the heat, but that doesn't make the days when I need air conditioning any better. Last September and even into October, we had a stretch where the temperature wasn't so bad, but it was so freaking humid. I'd walk my son to school and come back home drenched in sweat. So, if I'm shelling out a million bucks for a home, it sure DOES need air conditioning.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-04-2018, 10:22 AM
 
Location: Needham, MA
6,326 posts, read 9,046,785 times
Reputation: 5324
Quote:
Originally Posted by SA_Homeowner View Post
But... I don't think that's the issue. I think that asking $1.3 million puts it in a price point where there are likely fewer buyers. I'm certainly not saying it isn't worth every penny of it... but a home in that price range usually takes longer to sell.
I can assure you that in the Boston area and particularly in a wealthy suburb like Hingham that there is a near endless supply of buyers at this price point.

Quote:
Originally Posted by just_because View Post
I may be wrong but aren't multiple visits from contractors a very positive sign? Or do people just do this? It takes a fair amount of time to think of and organize all of this. Explain what you want to contractors, answer a million questions, etc. Depending on the market and type of contractor, you may have to pay for such "assessments".

I assume they are pricing various pieces of work? What kind of work is it if you don't mind saying? obviously this is a big statement as to what people see are the weaknesses.
It is a positive sign except sometimes the contractor will give a huge number in their quote of point out some kind of deficiency with the house that will kill the buyer's interest. So, it's a sign of interest but it could cause the transaction to go either way.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeJaquish View Post
You had plenty of lookers when listed with an agent.

Gotta find out how to convince them to take the next step.
Price is the easy way, but you might press to learn what the true stumbling blocks are for these buyers.
Couldn't agree more. Lots of eyeballs but no offers is an indicator that you're close but something is wrong. Make sure to ask the right questions to get down to the bottom of it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by 2houses.oh.no View Post
A/C is the main thing they want. Connection/conversion from oil to natural gas. Laundry is on 1st floor, some want it on the second floor. One of the bedrooms on the 2nd floor is very small and there is a flat roof that it could easily be extended over. Most want it larger. In some cases they have 3 young kids and want to convert 2nd floor to 3 bedrooms. Those are the main concerns.

Some want to make the barn an accessory dwelling unit mainly for parents. I think the law to do so just passed last week in Hingham. It meets all the criteria.
Having quotes in hand for that work will help a lot. Also, make sure your price accounts for this work.

Quote:
Originally Posted by johngolf View Post
I call BS on that. I lived in MA most of my younger life and then again for 20 years from age 40 to 60. It is only them cheap old Yankees SOB's that will tell you that you do not need AC. Believe me, you need it there.
I agree. I've lived in New England my entire life. I will not even look at a house if it doesn't have C/A.

Quote:
Originally Posted by just_because View Post
Times change. Particularly in the Boston area, preferences have seemed to change to newer builds or complete modernization of older homes. Plenty of tech money from outside of New England. "Mixed marriages" (New Englander and non-New Englander) dilute old New England ways. Old frugal ways and acceptance of inconvenience has dwindled. Unlike many places in the country, New Englanders accepted quirky old things and held onto that for longer than the rest of the country. That defining characteristic is slipping away.

Old, wealthy families used to own beautiful summer homes on the Cape, Vineyard, Nantucket, etc with no air conditioning, perhaps no central heat, functional but simple old kitchens, old furniture and few conveniences - just a few old bikes and the beach. Yes these still exist but they are a dying breed. Either demolished or completely rebuilt and extended to create second homes that are as large and well appointed as their primary Wellesley or Weston homes. You see this in all expensive areas of the Cape and islands. And New Hampshire and Maine. Younger people don't even want their second homes to be old and quirky, never mind their primary homes. Not making value judgments about anyone, that's just the way it is.

I agree that few people today will want to live in a home like that without central air and since it's just expected, many people will have problems embarking on such a big and invasive project, just to get the place to meet what's now considered a basic need.
I agree. The old Yankee mentality is not as common as it once was. A lot of people want C/A in their home and older homes like this one can be harder to add it in. Some houses are definitely bigger projects than others for adding C/A.

Quote:
Originally Posted by NorthofHere View Post
True, but it differs from town to town. While in the town I grew up in, people are purchasing old capes and renovating them, they aren't doing them excessively into mega mansions; however, in towns like Needham these same capes are being purchased two lots at a time and being torn down and building one new mega mansion on both lots. It takes money to do that because even these old capes are going for $400K in my town and much higher in Needham. Buy two in Needham and that means you are putting close to a 2 million dollar house up.
I live in Needham and I can assure you no one is purchasing two homes and tearing them down in order to build one new home. Lots in this town can sell anywhere from $600K to $1M+. I just sold one up in Birds Hill for $755K. You can drive down any street in town and run across a teardown in process. I can assure you though that 99.9% of the time it's one house going down and one house coming up. Occasionally, you see one house come down and two come up. However, two houses coming down and one coming up is incredibly rare because of the lot prices.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-09-2018, 11:37 PM
Status: "US Dream Tracker : 67%" (set 5 days ago)
 
3,270 posts, read 1,726,573 times
Reputation: 2773
No/lacks privacy.

Neighbor is closer to the pool.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-10-2018, 10:39 AM
 
Location: Finally the house is done and we are in Port St. Lucie!
3,488 posts, read 1,798,894 times
Reputation: 9683
Whoa! I just noticed Just_because is no longer a member!

Thought things were calmer around this section lately.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-26-2018, 06:51 AM
 
3,758 posts, read 2,914,842 times
Reputation: 11999
And another drop to $1,259,000. Has been for sale now for over a year. At that price point, I dont know how much these small (for this price range) drops are going to help. Would be interesting knowing if there have been any offers at all.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Real Estate
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top