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Old 01-27-2018, 09:44 PM
 
Location: Needham, MA
6,324 posts, read 9,039,168 times
Reputation: 5324

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Quote:
Originally Posted by SailCT View Post
It's always about the price no matter what in RE.
A lot of people say that to the point where it's become a real estate cliche. Personally, I don't subscribe to that theory. In my mind, it's about the value proposition you present to the buyer. Half of that equation is the price and the other half is the product offered. Make the product more attractive or give it more features and you can justify a higher price. Staging or doing some pre-market repairs/improvements improves the product and therefore improves the value.

This being said, if you've maximized the product and you have an effective marketing plan then all that's left is the price. A good real estate agent can easily accomplish the first two things. The third can sometimes be harder because it's not always easy to get a seller to agree to a price until they've seen the market react to the price they think the house should be at.

Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
I think one thing to remember is that things are changing and MA is seeing a huge influx of out of staters who want brand new, modern homes. They don't value our antique homes. Even the younger New Englanders don't value antiques that much anymore. I don't agree with those values but that's what I'm seeing.
Couldn't agree more. Antique homes are not very popular with today's buyers.

Quote:
Originally Posted by runswithscissors View Post
Maybe you guys in New England have your own terminology and call everything radiators. Or maybe you all use some type of baseboard gas or hot water or steam systems heating which looks like electric in bad photos.
I think the subject of radiators has been beaten to death a bit in this thread. However, I just want to say baseboard radiators whether they're hot water or electric look virtually the same from a distance. The only way you can tell is if you can see the hot water pipe running down the middle of the heating fins and that's unlikely to show in a photo.
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Old 01-27-2018, 10:36 PM
 
4,483 posts, read 7,947,544 times
Reputation: 6415
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldtrader View Post
Bad strategy. When there is a constant cutting of price like this, is it send a message to potential buyers. It is: This house is overpriced. The seller knows it is overpriced, and cutting the price every week, so don't buy now, as the home will be $40,000 cheaper in a month. Even interested buyers, will wait to see how cheap they can buy the home.
Yeah, its over priced. Seller knows it, buyers know it. Sure it will be $40k cheaper in a month, and that will be the actual value of the house if buyers jump on it at that price. Waiting 9 months for a magical buyer is not working.

Seller needs to sell it fast and not sit on it another 9 months. With this strategy, an interested buyer needs to jump on it before it sells to someone else.

It works, its simple, no games.
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Old 01-28-2018, 12:57 AM
 
Location: Texas
202 posts, read 118,569 times
Reputation: 407
Quote:
Originally Posted by runswithscissors View Post
It wasn't the STAGING or that the realtor told you to put little candles and pictures around that sold that house.

It was OBVIOUSLY the price.

Not to mention, you're comparing two different houses and stagers at two different times in the market.
She asked about staging and cost and I was giving her a couple of examples. I am not saying that the first house sold solely because of the staging and the work we did to make it ready. The reality, however, was that we originally had it on the market for months before doing the staging and the other work inside (new paint and carpet principally) and we got no offers. A couple of years later, we did those things and put it on the market (higher price) and it sold quickly. I do not attribute that all to the staging or the new paint or carpet. On the other hand, the lack of staging and the lack of painting/carpet when it was first listed was I think detrimental.

The second house, the staging was not in my opinion the primary reason did not originally sell. However, I had an observation to make about the staging that I felt was pertinent to someone considering staging. That is, find out the philosophy of the stager and see if what they plan to do meshes with what is needed for that house.

Anyway - these were simply meant to be examples given in response to the OP's question.
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Old 01-28-2018, 07:00 AM
 
1,528 posts, read 728,033 times
Reputation: 2062
Quote:
Originally Posted by MikePRU View Post

Couldn't agree more. Antique homes are not very popular with today's buyers.


I think the subject of radiators has been beaten to death a bit in this thread. However, I just want to say baseboard radiators whether they're hot water or electric look virtually the same from a distance. The only way you can tell is if you can see the hot water pipe running down the middle of the heating fins and that's unlikely to show in a photo.

I agree. That's why I could not remain silent when I heard someone stating with certainty that these were electric baseboard heaters. And if we were going to speculate and guess, my money would be on hot water baseboard radiators as these are the usual thing in NE homes like this (confirmed by the OP now anyway).

If it wasn't beaten totally to death before, it most certainly is now!

To the more interesting topic about antique homes in Massachusetts. I've been out of Boston for a while and I would not have thought this would be the case (but I certainly believe you). At that time, I looked at dozens of homes and I don't think any of them were new (or even built within the last 25 years) and few or none were total rehabs either. I dont' think anyone I knew had a new(er) house. More recently, I have had a few conversations with friends and family in the area where it kind of suggested that new was much more vogue than old. However, I thought maybe they just had a 'different' set of preferences. I guess times change...even in relatively traditional greater Boston.
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Old 01-28-2018, 07:12 AM
 
Location: Needham, MA
6,324 posts, read 9,039,168 times
Reputation: 5324
Quote:
Originally Posted by just_because View Post
To the more interesting topic about antique homes in Massachusetts. I've been out of Boston for a while and I would not have thought this would be the case (but I certainly believe you). At that time, I looked at dozens of homes and I don't think any of them were new (or even built within the last 25 years) and few or none were total rehabs either. I dont' think anyone I knew had a new(er) house. More recently, I have had a few conversations with friends and family in the area where it kind of suggested that new was much more vogue than old. However, I thought maybe they just had a 'different' set of preferences. I guess times change...even in relatively traditional greater Boston.
The vast majority of people in the Boston area are living in homes that people in the rest of the country would consider old. Most people I know live in a house built in the 1950s, 1960s, and other vintages. However, a house built in the 1700s or 1800s is a totally different animal is considered an antique. Anything built before about 1920 for example wouldn't even have a cement Foundation. Homes built before 1920 or so typically have Field Stone foundations which are not anywhere near as watertight as a cement Foundation.
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Old 01-28-2018, 08:58 AM
 
Location: Columbia SC
7,973 posts, read 6,728,842 times
Reputation: 10720
The bottom line if that this home in unique and it will only appeal to a buyer looking for such. Better pics, staging, etc. is not going to attract that buyer. The present pics are sufficient for the right kind of buyer to want to look at it.
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Old 01-28-2018, 09:40 AM
 
30 posts, read 27,556 times
Reputation: 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by johngolf View Post
The bottom line if that this home in unique and it will only appeal to a buyer looking for such. Better pics, staging, etc. is not going to attract that buyer. The present pics are sufficient for the right kind of buyer to want to look at it.
Do you have any suggestions on how to market it, what to put in the copy, etc. to help find that unique buyer?
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Old 01-28-2018, 09:43 AM
 
30 posts, read 27,556 times
Reputation: 32
Would you list and market it as 5 bedroom antique home with newer 1 bedroom in-law apartment as opposed to 6 bedroom home?

Carriage house or barn?
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Old 01-28-2018, 09:45 AM
 
433 posts, read 270,383 times
Reputation: 351
Huge house. Those take a while to sell - not a lot of people in this area have the income to buy a home like that, and for those that do Hingham in not the area they are looking.

What are the zoning laws? I could easily see this being split into 3 units.
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Old 01-28-2018, 10:12 AM
 
30 posts, read 27,556 times
Reputation: 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cloudship View Post
Huge house. Those take a while to sell - not a lot of people in this area have the income to buy a home like that, and for those that do Hingham in not the area they are looking.

What are the zoning laws? I could easily see this being split into 3 units.
Zoning is residential and you can have a professional business there, by appointment, no exterior signs. I don't think it can be split into more than one lot. Even though the parcel is big (1.4 acres) there is not a lot of frontage. I should probably add a plot plan.

My agent checked the possibility of legal accessory dwelling unit and the answer was no from the building department. Might be worth checking again.
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