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Old 02-03-2018, 09:05 AM
 
6,359 posts, read 7,299,120 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hal Roach View Post
The free software would be a lot better than them not correcting their own mistake which represents one third of the lot size. But, most know there is a disclaimer on every listing, so it is not like they will be held accountable, and it is quite obvious one can obtain a Realtors license without knowing anything about land measurements or eight grade mathematics. Flood zone? What's that? And isn't Michigan the state that originated the concept of "negative property values"? it hey, I actually once had a good car that was made in Detroit. No, not really.
Have a nice day.
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Old 02-03-2018, 09:12 AM
 
1,505 posts, read 833,986 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hbdwihdh378y9 View Post
But every realtor should be able to tell the difference between a 13,000-foot lot and a 9,000-foot one.
Especially, when it is a fenced, flat rectangle, with neighbors on both sides, on a block of 18 identical lots.
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Old 02-03-2018, 08:30 PM
 
Location: Ocala, FL
3,117 posts, read 5,731,498 times
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Realtors are not surveyors, that's why buyers typically pay a different professional for a survey to make certain.

Kind of like asking your doctor to do your taxes during your checkup.
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Old 02-04-2018, 12:57 AM
 
359 posts, read 202,043 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oldtrader View Post
What the OP is doing, is going somewhere and finding that it says that the lot size differs from official county/city records or the latest survey. What he is not considering if the official legal description, includes area for sidewalk, which in some cities, belongs to the owner of he lot, right to the edge of the street, or if it starts at the in side of the sidewalk. There are so many variables you don't know.

Example, our lot is 5 acres. But we also own the county roadway according to the official plat map and legal survey by plat description, and there is a lane for a total of 4 houses and a 30 acre field. We also own that lane, and the county says they have the right to put a street 28 foot wide, to replace the lane and access properties in back of the 30 acre field. So actually we have 5 acres by the legal original description, but the county has the use of 30 feet along our border for a county road, and the rights to our lane, and a utility easement through our property. What the OP is talking about, may be if the home owners along that street, can include half the street width, and sidewalk being in the legal description, as total legal size of the lot. These will all be shown in the plat plan for the subdivision those lots are part of. The legal description can include more than the actual usable lot size. The Realtor is using the lot size from official records and survey, but when the parts that the city has easements over such as sidewalk etc, will be smaller.

The Realtor has no right to show the size of the lot from some site like the OP has brought up, as it is not the official legal size which includes those other parts. All the Realtor can use is the size from the legal description, and survey which should be the same.

The home owner may actually own the sidewalk etc., right up to the street, has to maintain the sidewalk, keep it clear of ice and snow, and repaired, but his usable lot is smaller as the OP is finding. Depends on how the city/county legally describes the lot size, and what is included in the legal description, and what is usable, which may be different. One reason the sidewalk is on the lot owners legal description and not usable by the lot owner, is it determines who owns the sidewalk as an example, and makes the lot owner responsible for maintaining the sidewalk replacing it if needed, and keeps snow and ice off he sidewalk. He is the legal owner of the sidewalk, and if does not maintain it and keep it safe, and does not keep the ice and snow off it, then the lot owner is the one that gets sued if someone walks down on it and it is not safe to use due to needing repair or ice and snow makes it unsafe, it is the lot owner that gets sued not the city.

So OP, the legal description and measurements are most often different from the lot measurements you are relying on, and would show on a survey using the legal description the larger size.

The Realtor can only use the legal description to determine and list as the size of the lot. Our first house in the Silicon Valley had a front yard that from the front of the house to sidewalk, was 35 feet deeper than the legal description showed. This was demanded by the City/County, as that 35 feet was to allow the street to be widened by 2 lanes in the future. Yes the City/County actually owned that 35 feet we had in a nice lawn. Our lots were 35 feet deeper than the one across the street. Years after we sold the home, the road was widened, and the size of he usable lot was reduced by 35 feet.

This one factor in the size computation, made our usable lots 1750 feet larger than the legal description shown by the county records. If there is an alley in back between 2 rows of houses which in not common today, the legal description will include half the alley.

These are the reasons, that the usable lot size you are talking about, and the legal lot size shown on county records or surveys and shown by the Realtor differ. By laws the Realtor has to give the legal description lot size that is official. They are doing what is correct.

The surveyor, when they do a legal survey, will be the legal description of the lot not the actual usable lot size, and will show that property actually owned by the Buyer, Seller, and used by the Realtor. What the surveyor is doing, is showing the actual land owned by the owners owning the property, and is marking the true property lines, not showing the usable lot after taking off things like sidewalk, etc. as you are referring to. That is why the two measurements differ. I learned about this in a University class on land measurements and surveys.

As I was taught, there is a legal size of the total lot, and the usable lot where the house sits, and always expect them to differ.
Good point. I'd add that there is also the possibility part or all of the street is also included. 100+ years ago platting practice in some places was that the street was on right of way and not deeded over to the city. My new neighborhood has a private street with everyone in the neighborhood granted a perpetual easement to drive in the right of way. Lot size includes this and since it's a street with houses on only one side and fairly wide street 20% of the lot is unbuildable.
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Old 02-04-2018, 02:14 AM
 
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It is the curb to the middle of the back alley in the five hundred lots I have looked at in Arizona, many dedicated 60-100 years ago.
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Old 02-07-2018, 12:56 AM
 
1,505 posts, read 833,986 times
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Update: her data source was "CRS," which is Courthouse Retrieval Service. I would be this is widely used by Realtors in areas without the county's records being online. At least in this case, they refer to it as the "county data," when it is just a retrieval system. My agent contacted me, I told her 1) lot dimension was blank 2) no where does it say .31 acres or sf equivalent 3) the lot is obviously 50-51 feet wide...and the naked eye can see it is not five times deeper than width.
She replied, stating that she would call the county, herself.
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Old 02-07-2018, 09:02 AM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
4,010 posts, read 5,157,418 times
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I just wanted to point out that in certain situations anomalies in legal vs actual lot size may be due to easements or similar.

For instance, our yard (per that tool and a survey we had done) is 0.51 acres. However, county records list us as 0.4 acres.

We have a creek running behind our home, and while our yard is fenced all the way to the creek, and it is ground that we use and maintain, the very back portion apparently is property of the sewer district who 'own' (or rather, have jurisdiction of) the creek. The situation is the same with all of the neighbors with properties along the creek.

So in some circumstances, property records may be different to tools in the OPs post due to different situations such as ours.
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Old 02-07-2018, 09:33 AM
 
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In your case, I would want to see the permit for the fence. The ones I have seen are easements, which would not affect lot size. But, yes, for starters, you need to know the property boundaries before you can measure.
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Old 02-07-2018, 09:47 AM
 
Location: Philaburbia
31,153 posts, read 57,196,397 times
Reputation: 51999
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hal Roach View Post
The free software would be a lot better than them not correcting their own mistake which represents one third of the lot size. But, most know there is a disclaimer on every listing, so it is not like they will be held accountable, and it is quite obvious one can obtain a Realtors license without knowing anything about land measurements or eight grade mathematics. Flood zone? What's that? And isn't Michigan the state that originated the concept of "negative property values"? But hey, I actually once had a good car that was made in Detroit. No, not really.
Wow.

No need to be insulting, especially toward people who are trying to help you.

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Old 02-07-2018, 09:55 AM
 
1,505 posts, read 833,986 times
Reputation: 1137
Don't tell me a highly sophisticated tool is worthless compared to a realtor, who can't back up her numbers.
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