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Old 02-07-2018, 09:23 AM
 
Location: 5,400 feet
1,599 posts, read 1,964,110 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blazin65 View Post
They showed the easement on a survey they had. It was very difficult to see this on the drawing. They even admitted it could hardly be seen.
For the easement to be valid, the easement document should be recorded in your chain of title. You should be able to find it, and some counties even have online searches. If you received an owner's title policy when you bought your house, the easement should be listed as an exception (or an impediment to your clear title). I was once able to stop an electric utility from running a line on my property because they could not produce a recorded easement and were unwilling to pay me for one.

Also, your state will have regulations about setbacks from underground gas lines and line depth. Those are generally set by line size and line pressure, and are usually regulated by the public utility commission (or some similarly named group). They should also be readily available.
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Old 02-07-2018, 12:30 PM
 
Location: Minnesota
1,098 posts, read 322,391 times
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I thought utility easements generally were along the front of lots and along back lot lines. From what I have seen the "main" gas lines run along the front easements and individual homes have lines that feed off of that. Are they running a "main" gas line to neighborhoods behind your home. If so why do they not install main lines along front easements in that neighborhood? Maybe there is some obstacles that prevent that? How big is this line(diameter)? Do you have gas hook up in your home? Is the utility company doing this running lines along easement doing it that way because it's cheaper than running it to neighborhood along streets /front easements?

There were some problems in Minneapolis-Saint Paul when gas companies were replacing underground pipes and nicked gas lines causing gas explosions. They had to go back and inspect to make no others were damaged.

https://www.mprnews.org/story/2010/02/24/explosion-folo
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Old 02-07-2018, 02:23 PM
 
6,142 posts, read 6,570,707 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Izzie1213 View Post
I thought utility easements generally were along the front of lots and along back lot lines. From what I have seen the "main" gas lines run along the front easements and individual homes have lines that feed off of that. Are they running a "main" gas line to neighborhoods behind your home. If so why do they not install main lines along front easements in that neighborhood? Maybe there is some obstacles that prevent that? How big is this line(diameter)? Do you have gas hook up in your home? Is the utility company doing this running lines along easement doing it that way because it's cheaper than running it to neighborhood along streets /front easements?

There were some problems in Minneapolis-Saint Paul when gas companies were replacing underground pipes and nicked gas lines causing gas explosions. They had to go back and inspect to make no others were damaged.

https://www.mprnews.org/story/2010/02/24/explosion-folo
They oftentimes do, but this isn't a line which will service his neighborhood. As mentioned earlier, it's a 4" line meant to serve the neighborhood behind his house (in another community, if I recall correctly).

Larger gas lines, in particular, will traverse a property every which way. I've bought a couple of large parcels where the gas lines cut diagonally across both of them. (And I still can't get any free gas!)
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Old 02-07-2018, 02:34 PM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ
779 posts, read 255,602 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blazin65 View Post
They showed the easement on a survey they had. It was very difficult to see this on the drawing. They even admitted it could hardly be seen.

Doesn't matter. It's much more visible on the county plat maps which are available for you to review at the county office that keeps those records.


Bottom line: You don't have any say in the matter.
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Old 02-07-2018, 06:01 PM
 
5,548 posts, read 2,623,843 times
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This wouldn't concern me much, except I'd want to watch them (from inside, if possible) to make sure they don't do something improper in the digging. Just in case they damage something.

Easements and gas lines are part of the modern world, so I wouldn't be too concerned. In fact, it's a plus, isn't it, that your neighborhood will be connected to another one for gas? We don't have gas in our neighborhood. Wish we did. We're all electric.
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Old 02-07-2018, 06:02 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in America
11,875 posts, read 9,049,756 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blazin65 View Post
I found out that the gas company is going to run a gas line (they say 4 inch pipe) in between my house and my neighborís house. There's only about 10 feet in between our houses, so we're not talking about much property here. Gas lines already exist in my neighborhood, as utilities are all underground. This is about connecting my neighborhood area to the area behind me, which is actually another municipality.

Supposedly in between our houses is an easement giving them right of way. I didnít know there was an easement there, it wasn't explained to me when I bought the house, nor does it show on the survey. I guess I do now.

They say most of the digging will be in the front, and then they will drill underground to the back of the house and then hook up with another pipe thatís in the neighborhood (city) behind me. Once this is complete, nothing should even be noticeable, expect a manhole cover near the sidewalk.

Is this pretty common? As a homeowner, should I be concerned? Are there any questions to ask and/or do I need to do anything to protect my interests? I'm really not that worried about it. But should I be?

There's a part of me that wants to say sure you can do this, for a $20,000 assessment because this is my property and my property value could be negatively affected.
Check your deed. Easements are typically listed on the deed. When a survey is done, they will be listed and noted as well. You would need a copy of the survey and they will be noted. Easements and Rights of Way for utilities is very common. How else would you get utilities to your property?

It won't impact your property value. No idea why you think they should pay $20K. Do you want to pay $20K to have gas at your house? Probably not. You also can't tell the utility company that they can't install a gas line on their easement. You can fight it, but it will cost you a fortune and you'll lose.
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Old 02-07-2018, 06:52 PM
 
4,342 posts, read 7,386,357 times
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I'm 99% sure its on a deed somewhere. Could have been filed 50 years ago as a utility easement along with every other easement they needed to run the line and those owners signed off or were paid for the easement.

Was the easement language ever added to your deed? Possibly not. But its still legal easement.

If your looking for a loophole.... its possible the language of the original easement said something like "run gas line easement to connect the next subdivision" and now they want to run it to a completely new town. If this is the case you could argue that the easement is being overburdened that was not listed in the original easement and you wish to be compensated. Its a long shot, but possible. You could spend thousands on a lawyer and get nothing or something. Rolling the dice.
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Old 02-07-2018, 07:18 PM
 
6,142 posts, read 6,570,707 times
Reputation: 10315
Quote:
Originally Posted by ss20ts View Post
Check your deed. Easements are typically listed on the deed. When a survey is done, they will be listed and noted as well. You would need a copy of the survey and they will be noted. Easements and Rights of Way for utilities is very common. How else would you get utilities to your property?

It won't impact your property value. No idea why you think they should pay $20K. Do you want to pay $20K to have gas at your house? Probably not. You also can't tell the utility company that they can't install a gas line on their easement. You can fight it, but it will cost you a fortune and you'll lose.
That's usually not the case in my area. Typically, language of a deed will simply state "subject to easements and building and use restrictions of record." Occasionally a specific restriction will be noted on a deed, but not often. That's why a title report is needed to identify all of the easements and other encumbrances.

Note that even if there were no mention of easements on a deed, a recorded easement would still be valid.
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Old 02-07-2018, 09:04 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in America
11,875 posts, read 9,049,756 times
Reputation: 19309
Quote:
Originally Posted by jackmichigan View Post
That's usually not the case in my area. Typically, language of a deed will simply state "subject to easements and building and use restrictions of record." Occasionally a specific restriction will be noted on a deed, but not often. That's why a title report is needed to identify all of the easements and other encumbrances.

Note that even if there were no mention of easements on a deed, a recorded easement would still be valid.
In my state, easements and rights of way are recorded with the deed. I've had them on every house I've owned in 2 states.
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Old 02-07-2018, 09:16 PM
DKM
 
Location: Thousand Oaks, CA
1,007 posts, read 288,628 times
Reputation: 1043
Quote:
Originally Posted by ss20ts View Post
No idea why you think they should pay $20K. Do you want to pay $20K to have gas at your house? Probably not. You also can't tell the utility company that they can't install a gas line on their easement. You can fight it, but it will cost you a fortune and you'll lose.
This concept is born of people's ignorance about how real estate property laws work. There are many people who believe if they hold title to land, its theirs to do as they please and no other entities can have rights to access it. "My property" isn't. You can own a claim on a parcel of land, but the state is the ultimate owner of all real property. That's where the term "real" comes to play.

Nobody owes the OP any money for putting this pipe in.
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